daily life in the military

Forum rules
While the moderators are happy to help point people in the right direction for legal assistance and to attempt to keep these forums civil and tidy, please bear in mind that an Internet forum is not the place for providing or receiving legal advice or for the creation of any attorney-client privileges or obligations. Also keep in mind that Forumosa and the moderators cannot conduct comprehensive reviews of all laws or legal concepts referenced or discussed within these forums – laws and regulations are updated and amended, interpretations do change, and sometimes the legal landscape can change very fast. Forumosa provides these legal forums for general informational purposes only. By using these legal forums, you agree that the information does not constitute legal or other professional advice and no attorney-client or other relationship is created between you and any other posters on these forums. DO NOT CONSIDER THE FORUMS TO BE A SUBSTITUTE FOR OBTAINING LEGAL ADVICE FROM A QUALIFIED LICENSED ATTORNEY.

Re: daily life in the military

Postby twjl » 12 Jun 2011, 22:13

Here's an interesting blog by an ABC who enlisted:
http://baladaily.blogspot.com/2011/02/next-stamp.html
twjl
Càiniǎo
Càiniǎo
 
Posts: 30
Joined: 08 Jan 2011, 00:54
16 Recommends(s)
2 Recognized(s)

6000

Re: daily life in the military

Postby BigJohn » 13 Jun 2011, 01:47

sandman wrote:
i still live in Canada but I would like to improve my english,

Weel, yon's aboot as likely as a tasty seal-flipper pie, eh?


Stunning accuracy! Sounded exactly like the folks at the old Cod and Reefer Pub back in Stunned Harbour, NL.
Forumosan avatar
BigJohn
National Security Advisor (guójiā ānquán gùwèn)
National Security Advisor (guójiā ānquán gùwèn)
 
Posts: 4601
Joined: 25 Jun 2005, 01:45
Location: Lost in time, lost in space...and meaning
104 Recognized(s)

6000

Re: daily life in the military

Postby kuanchengsong » 01 May 2012, 23:23

birdcage wrote:English is not my first language so I apologize in advance for wrong grammar.

I'm currently on military service, 54 days in. I'm serving at the R.O.C. Marines Corps, so I can only speak from my own experiences in that branch. Unlike you, I was not born in Taiwan, but I know basic Mandarin. First 37 days is boot camp. We wake up at 5:30 in the morning, exercise and jog for 15 minutes. Then we eat breakfast. After that they issue us our rifle and we begin class. Classes are held outdoors, under a big tree, on the auditorium, and even on an empty swimming pool. After lunch, they'll give us an hour and a half to rest. Then in the afternoon, we resume class. They taught us everything from cleaning, handling and using a rifle, and some other stuffs too. After dinner, we shower. Then at night, we usually sing military songs, listen to our drill sergeants tell stories, or do "duties". Duties include taking out the trash, cleaning the toilet etc.

I did have a difficult time the first few days because of my poor Mandarin skills, but my comrades helped me out. Whenever I don't understand something, they would explain it to me using simple words. I was never bullied or dissed. They were quite fond of me because I"m a foreigner. I made a lot of friends. Actually, my lack of Mandarin comprehension was my ticket out of getting yelled at and punished by my drill sergeants, because they don't speak English, they just ignored me.

The hardest part for me during boot camp is the weather. Its 35 degrees outside and we are marching under scorching heat wearing full military outfits (helmet, jacket and boots ) while carrying a 7.5 kilogram rifle.. and a small folding chair strapped to our belts. Anyway, I'd say joining the R.O.C. military is a perfect way to learn and improve Mandarin. Basic Mandarin is enough for you to get through each day. If you don't understand the commands, just follow whatever your comrades are doing and you'll do just fine.

If you have any more questions just let me know and I'll try to answer them in full detail. :)


hey birdcage, I'm considering joining the army, but I am concerned if i will be able to train in boxing. It's possible to leave the base to train or do they have boxing facilities on the base? Of course I know that the situation varies, but i just want to have an idea of what I'm getting myself into. Any insight would be greatly appreciated.
kuanchengsong
Ink Still Wet in Passport (shífēn xīnshǒu)
Ink Still Wet in Passport (shífēn xīnshǒu)
 
Posts: 13
Joined: 01 May 2012, 12:15

6000

Re: daily life in the military

Postby birdcage » 19 May 2012, 22:13

hey birdcage, I'm considering joining the army, but I am concerned if i will be able to train in boxing. It's possible to leave the base to train or do they have boxing facilities on the base? Of course I know that the situation varies, but i just want to have an idea of what I'm getting myself into. Any insight would be greatly appreciated.[/quote]


hi kuanchengsong! Not exactly boxing but there is a taekwondo team called the 海陸莒拳隊 in Taiwan Marines Corps. If I'm not mistaken, recruitment starts after boot camp.I don't know if they have the same thing in the army, navy and the air force. Other than that, I'm afraid there are no trainings in the military that is related to boxing. Conscripts are given two days off every week to leave base and go back home.
birdcage
Ink Still Wet in Passport (shífēn xīnshǒu)
Ink Still Wet in Passport (shífēn xīnshǒu)
 
Posts: 2
Joined: 15 May 2010, 04:37

6000

Previous




Return to Military Conscription



Who is online

Forumosans browsing this forum: No Forumosans and 1 visitor

Be who you are and say what you feel because those who mind don't matter and those who matter don't mind -- DR SEUSS