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daily life in the military

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daily life in the military

Postby ironlung13 » 13 Aug 2010, 12:12

I'm interested in what daily life is like in the Taiwanese military, any information or experiences would be greatly appreciated. I'm thinking about doing the one year service but I'm worried that my basic Mandarin will make it a terrible experience.

a little background info about me:

I was born in Taiwan but left at the age of five and grew up in Canada. i still live in Canada but I would like to improve my english, I have no thoughts of staying in Taiwan long term but figure I need to improve my Mandarin since it's a great skill and most of my extended family still lives in Taiwan.

thanks in advance
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Re: daily life in the military

Postby olm » 13 Aug 2010, 12:53

ironlung13 wrote:I'm interested in what daily life is like in the Taiwanese military, any information or experiences would be greatly appreciated.


According to one youngish coworker who served on the beautiful R.O.C. island of Kinmen (Jinmen) (not intended to be sarcastic), the service involved mainly drinking Kaoliang Liquor.

Others told me there was no alcohol at all, but maybe that's because they were in a unit of motorcycle drivers for honor guard, show and parade use.

Anyway, reading through the topics here I get the impression that at least you should be able to speak perfect Mandarin before joining the army, lest you be ridiculed, singled out and dissed... Just read a bit through the threads here before actually thinking about doing this. Either way, good luck and wish you will enjoy your time in Taiwan!
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Re: daily life in the military

Postby sandman » 13 Aug 2010, 13:06

i still live in Canada but I would like to improve my english,

Weel, yon's aboot as likely as a tasty seal-flipper pie, eh?
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Re: daily life in the military

Postby birdcage » 21 Aug 2010, 23:32

English is not my first language so I apologize in advance for wrong grammar.

I'm currently on military service, 54 days in. I'm serving at the R.O.C. Marines Corps, so I can only speak from my own experiences in that branch. Unlike you, I was not born in Taiwan, but I know basic Mandarin. First 37 days is boot camp. We wake up at 5:30 in the morning, exercise and jog for 15 minutes. Then we eat breakfast. After that they issue us our rifle and we begin class. Classes are held outdoors, under a big tree, on the auditorium, and even on an empty swimming pool. After lunch, they'll give us an hour and a half to rest. Then in the afternoon, we resume class. They taught us everything from cleaning, handling and using a rifle, and some other stuffs too. After dinner, we shower. Then at night, we usually sing military songs, listen to our drill sergeants tell stories, or do "duties". Duties include taking out the trash, cleaning the toilet etc.

I did have a difficult time the first few days because of my poor Mandarin skills, but my comrades helped me out. Whenever I don't understand something, they would explain it to me using simple words. I was never bullied or dissed. They were quite fond of me because I"m a foreigner. I made a lot of friends. Actually, my lack of Mandarin comprehension was my ticket out of getting yelled at and punished by my drill sergeants, because they don't speak English, they just ignored me.

The hardest part for me during boot camp is the weather. Its 35 degrees outside and we are marching under scorching heat wearing full military outfits (helmet, jacket and boots ) while carrying a 7.5 kilogram rifle.. and a small folding chair strapped to our belts. Anyway, I'd say joining the R.O.C. military is a perfect way to learn and improve Mandarin. Basic Mandarin is enough for you to get through each day. If you don't understand the commands, just follow whatever your comrades are doing and you'll do just fine.

If you have any more questions just let me know and I'll try to answer them in full detail. :)
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Re: daily life in the military

Postby BigJohn » 22 Aug 2010, 02:18

I totally respect the marines here. In my opinion, they are real soldiers. Not like the surrender happy sneaky conscripts that follow in the fine military tradition of CKS and all that. How do you say "semper fidelis" in guoyu?
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Re: daily life in the military

Postby Poagao » 22 Aug 2010, 09:24

BigJohn wrote:I totally respect the marines here. In my opinion, they are real soldiers. Not like the surrender happy sneaky conscripts that follow in the fine military tradition of CKS and all that. How do you say "semper fidelis" in guoyu?


The situation in Taiwan is somewhat different from that of the U.S.; the marines here are also largely made up of conscripts and share many of the same military traditions and training methods of the other parts of the military. The special forces, especially the volunteers, are the ones that get more respect from me.
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Re: daily life in the military

Postby urodacus » 22 Aug 2010, 09:56

carrying a 7.5 kilogram rifle.. and a small folding chair strapped to our belts.


the chair will prove extremely useful in combat.


a 7.5 kg rifle? bit heavier than the AR15 i thought the ROC used.

unless you were a gunner.
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Re: daily life in the military

Postby BigJohn » 22 Aug 2010, 10:50

Poagao wrote:
BigJohn wrote:I totally respect the marines here. In my opinion, they are real soldiers. Not like the surrender happy sneaky conscripts that follow in the fine military tradition of CKS and all that. How do you say "semper fidelis" in guoyu?


The situation in Taiwan is somewhat different from that of the U.S.; the marines here are also largely made up of conscripts and share many of the same military traditions and training methods of the other parts of the military. The special forces, especially the volunteers, are the ones that get more respect from me.


I meant the marine commandos with their tough training: a 40 k run following a 10k swim, and the infamous crawling over jagged coral to prove their control over pain.
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Re: daily life in the military

Postby Chris » 22 Aug 2010, 10:54

I've heard that the soldiers in the ROC military have to keep journals about their thoughts and feelings, which they need to hand in on a regular basis. Based on the info within, they receive counseling if they seem to be going through trouble adapting to military life.
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Re: daily life in the military

Postby Poagao » 22 Aug 2010, 11:09

BigJohn wrote:
Poagao wrote:
BigJohn wrote:I totally respect the marines here. In my opinion, they are real soldiers. Not like the surrender happy sneaky conscripts that follow in the fine military tradition of CKS and all that. How do you say "semper fidelis" in guoyu?


The situation in Taiwan is somewhat different from that of the U.S.; the marines here are also largely made up of conscripts and share many of the same military traditions and training methods of the other parts of the military. The special forces, especially the volunteers, are the ones that get more respect from me.


I meant the marine commandos with their tough training: a 40 k run following a 10k swim, and the infamous crawling over jagged coral to prove their control over pain.


The frogmen? Oh yeah, those guys are hard core.
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