Click here to go to our new forums at http://tw.forumosa.com
If you are a Forumosan Regular, when you log in for the FIRST TIME, you must RESET your password by using the Password Recovery system.

Usernames on the new forums must not contain any SPACES and must end with LETTER or a NUMBER; if yours does, you will be prompted to change your Username
Contact us at admin(at)forumosa(dot)com or @forumosa on Twitter or on our Facebook Page if you have any questions or problems logging back in

Camphor Press: A New Taiwan-focused Digital Publisher

Moderator: hansioux

Re: Camphor Press: A New Taiwan-focused Digital Publisher

Postby Camphor Press » 24 Feb 2014, 19:18

Released today, Through Formosa is a fascinating and unexpectedly funny account of Taiwan under Japanese rule, written by the prolific Owen Rutter. Formerly a British colonial officer in Borneo, Rutter and his wife were guests of the Japanese government, but despite their tightly plotted itinerary showcasing the best of the island, Rutter is not shy of criticizing his hosts where he feels it appropriate. But this is balanced with praise for certain aspects of Japanese culture, including aesthetic sensibilities and work ethic.

One custom he finds peculiar is the constant exchange of calling cards, outlined in a passage that could almost have been written yesterday rather than nearly a century ago:

The card ceremonial is a strange example of how a Western social custom can be adopted and intensified by an Eastern nation; but, when one comes to think of it, the whole thing is extremely sensible. As a rule Americans seldom forget names when they are introduced. They seem to have a simple method of memorizing them by repetition. They just say “Glad to know you, Mr. Snooks,” and they have got Mr. Snooks in a pigeon-hole of their mind for all time. With the English it is different. To begin with, no Englishman ever listens when he is being introduced. Even if he did he would listen in vain, because the introducer usually forgets at least one of the names at the critical moment, or, if he happens to remember, gives them in an inaudible mumble. Unlike the American, who makes no bones about it, the Englishman is too shy to ask his new acquaintance to repeat his name. On the rare occasion when he might hear it he is too busy criticizing the owner’s personal appearance, and when he begins to grope for it in his mind the name is gone. More often still he really doesn’t care a hoot what the other fellow’s name is, and if, later, he wants to attract his attention, he does so by saying ‘Er.’

Rutter is particularly interested in Japanese treatment of the Aborigines, and spends a good portion of the book on his travels to the edge of ‘savage’ territory. Here his sympathies lie firmly with the Aborigines, and he is progressive (for his day) in arguing that they should be left to retain their customs and self-government.

Image

Through Formosa is available today for NT$120 from the Camphor Press website, for Kindle, PC, Mac, iPad, and a host of other e-readers, smartphones, and tablets.

Image
User avatar
Camphor Press
Memorized My Password (gāng jìhǎo zìjǐ de mìmǎ)
 
Posts: 73
{ AUTHOR_TOPIC }
Joined: 05 Jan 2014, 22:28
Location: Taipei
In Taiwan since: 26 Aug 2002



Re: Camphor Press: A New Taiwan-focused Digital Publisher

Postby Camphor Press » 01 Apr 2014, 12:53

Our latest release is The Aviator of Tsingtao, the real life adventures of German World War I pilot Gunther Plüschow. Stationed in Tsingtao (Qingdao), the German colony in China, Plüschow and his Taube monoplane were the "Kaiser's One Man Air Force" in the East. At the outbreak of war, he flew reconnaissance sorties over the territory, and is claimed by some as the first pilot to have downed another aircraft (with his sidearm, as the Taube itself was unarmed). When Tsingtao fell, he flew under orders to neutral territory in China, crash-landed, and began a journey back to Germany that would take him across the Pacific, the continental United States, and the Atlantic. Discovered by the British in Gibraltar and sent to a prisoner of war camp in England, he became the only POW from either war to successfully escape from mainland Britain and make it back to Germany.

Image

His story—told in his own words—would be unbelievable, but multiple independent sources back up his incredible account. Published in 1916, the book went on to sell 700,000 copies in the interwar years, and was translated into English. This Camphor Press edition features a brand new introduction by British journalist Anton Rippon, author of the standard biography of this extraordinary man. Also added are notes, photographs, and a timeline of Plüschow's life. The Aviator of Tsingtao is available now for Kindle, PC, iPad and many other devices, at a special introductory price of NT$60 from our website, or $1.99 from Amazon.com.
User avatar
Camphor Press
Memorized My Password (gāng jìhǎo zìjǐ de mìmǎ)
 
Posts: 73
{ AUTHOR_TOPIC }
Joined: 05 Jan 2014, 22:28
Location: Taipei
In Taiwan since: 26 Aug 2002



Re: Camphor Press: A New Taiwan-focused Digital Publisher

Postby Camphor Press » 11 Aug 2014, 22:20

Camphor Press co-founder Michael Cannings was recently interviewed by Keith Menconi for ICRT's Taiwan Talk program. It's an interesting look at how and why the business was started, and what he thinks of the publishing situation in Taiwan. You can listen online or download the podcast on the Taiwan Talk iTunes page.
User avatar
Camphor Press
Memorized My Password (gāng jìhǎo zìjǐ de mìmǎ)
 
Posts: 73
{ AUTHOR_TOPIC }
Joined: 05 Jan 2014, 22:28
Location: Taipei
In Taiwan since: 26 Aug 2002



Re: Camphor Press: A New Taiwan-focused Digital Publisher

Postby sofun » 12 Aug 2014, 15:03

If I buy directly from you, I'm downloading a pdf, correct?
sofun
Martyr's Shrine Guard (zhōngliècí wèibīng)
Martyr's Shrine Guard (zhōngliècí wèibīng)
 
Posts: 1722
Joined: 26 Jun 2014, 15:20



Re: Camphor Press: A New Taiwan-focused Digital Publisher

Postby Camphor Press » 12 Aug 2014, 15:26

sofun wrote:If I buy directly from you, I'm downloading a pdf, correct?

No, you're getting two files - a mobi version and an ePub version. Mobi is the format used by Kindle, while ePub is used with most other devices, including PC, Apple (iPad, iPhone, Mac), Android tablets and phones, Kobo, Sony Reader and more. Both formats offer a superior experience to pdf: the text is resizable and flows naturally from page to page, you can easily bookmark or highlight passages, on many devices you can instantly look up words you don't know, and linked notes and tables of contents work smoothly.
User avatar
Camphor Press
Memorized My Password (gāng jìhǎo zìjǐ de mìmǎ)
 
Posts: 73
{ AUTHOR_TOPIC }
Joined: 05 Jan 2014, 22:28
Location: Taipei
In Taiwan since: 26 Aug 2002



Re: Camphor Press: A New Taiwan-focused Digital Publisher

Postby Mucha Man » 12 Aug 2014, 16:49

If you use the kindle app on an android phone you still need a mobi file don't you?
“Everywhere else in the world is also really old” said Prof. Liu, a renowned historian at Beijing University. “We always learn that China has 5000 years of cultural heritage, and that therefore we are very special. It appears that other places also have some of this heritage stuff. And are also old. Like, really old.”

https://www.facebook.com/taiwantemples
Mucha Man
Guan Yin (Guānyīn)
 
Posts: 19980
Joined: 01 Nov 2001, 17:01
Location: Mucha, of course



Re: Camphor Press: A New Taiwan-focused Digital Publisher

Postby Camphor Press » 12 Aug 2014, 17:15

Mucha Man wrote:If you use the kindle app on an android phone you still need a mobi file don't you?

That's true. The Kindle apps on any platform use mobi files, as do the Kindle readers themselves. There are other apps available for Android (such as Aldiko) which use ePubs. If you buy from our website you get both, so you can decide which fits your needs best.
User avatar
Camphor Press
Memorized My Password (gāng jìhǎo zìjǐ de mìmǎ)
 
Posts: 73
{ AUTHOR_TOPIC }
Joined: 05 Jan 2014, 22:28
Location: Taipei
In Taiwan since: 26 Aug 2002



Re: Camphor Press: A New Taiwan-focused Digital Publisher

Postby StefanMuc » 14 Dec 2014, 18:40

Is this project abandoned? I tried to create an account, but it won't even let me register, and trying the "contact us" route didn't get me a reply either.
StefanMuc
Breakfast Store Laoban (zǎocān diàn lǎobǎn)
Breakfast Store Laoban (zǎocān diàn lǎobǎn)
 
Posts: 137
Joined: 26 Nov 2007, 07:59



Re: Camphor Press: A New Taiwan-focused Digital Publisher

Postby Camphor Press » 14 Dec 2014, 19:03

StefanMuc wrote:Is this project abandoned? I tried to create an account, but it won't even let me register, and trying the "contact us" route didn't get me a reply either.

Still going strong, and we released a new book just last week. I'm sorry about the problem you had creating a user account - can you let me know what device/browser you used, and I'll take a look at it today.

EDIT: Found the problem with the registration and it should be fixed now. Apologies for the inconvenience!
User avatar
Camphor Press
Memorized My Password (gāng jìhǎo zìjǐ de mìmǎ)
 
Posts: 73
{ AUTHOR_TOPIC }
Joined: 05 Jan 2014, 22:28
Location: Taipei
In Taiwan since: 26 Aug 2002



Re: Camphor Press: A New Taiwan-focused Digital Publisher

Postby StefanMuc » 15 Dec 2014, 17:41

Thanks a lot, it works! :thanks:
Just bought Richard Saunders' Islands book.
StefanMuc
Breakfast Store Laoban (zǎocān diàn lǎobǎn)
Breakfast Store Laoban (zǎocān diàn lǎobǎn)
 
Posts: 137
Joined: 26 Nov 2007, 07:59



FRIENDLY REMINDER
   Please remember that Forumosa is not responsible for the content that appears on the other side of links that Forumosans post on our forums. As a discussion website, we encourage open and frank debate. We have learned that the most effective way to address questionable claims or accusations on Forumosa is by engaging in a sincere and constructive conversation. To make this website work, we must all feel safe in expressing our opinions, this also means backing up any claims with hard facts, including links to other websites.
   Please also remember that one should not believe everything one reads on the Internet, particularly from websites whose content cannot be easily verified or substantiated. Use your common sense and do not hesitate to ask for proof.
PreviousNext




Return to Culture & History



Who is online

Forumosans browsing this forum: No Forumosans and 2 guests