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Book: You Don't Know China

Moderator: hansioux

Re: You Don't Know China

Postby Rocket » 04 Jul 2014, 12:52

buzzkill1 wrote:I like the spirit of the book, but the first chapter is quite obvious to anyone who knows much of China. Doesn't exactly make me want to spend money for the full story. My grandma might gain something from it though. I think I'll write a book called, "You Don't Know Taiwan." Chapter 1: Taiwan is not Thailand


Chapter 2: No, Ma, it really is Sunday here
Ain't NO thing like me.
'Cept ME.

Lesson number one: Assume everybody wants to hit you.

Hey! Hey! Start shooting!!
At what?
The NAZIS, dumbfuck!!!
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Re: You Don't Know China

Postby Mucha Man » 04 Jul 2014, 16:18

Mr He wrote:My comment was a direct comment to Camphor Press. If they use print on demand, I am happy to pay for the books enough to make it worth their while to supply at least me.

If I were them, I would get a handful of each, who knows?


Ok let's look at Cafe Press.

It will cost you around $13 to print one 200 page book with a proper binding.
You need to pay author royalties and also make some profit so you are going to have to charge $16-18. That's a lot. And your customer still 5has to pay for shipping.

Now to pay for a proper cover image by soneone in the Philippines, book formatting, and all the back and forth which includes checking samples you will spend at least another $1000 and that's assuming you work almost for nothing.

So you will need to sell at least 1000 books just to pay for the cost of offering print books. However these books will not be available in book stores. Your customers will only know about them through your website where they will see the print book is 2x the ebook price.

If you use Amazon Create Space the print and ebook will be offered on the same page (sometimes) but the quality is not good and again the price will be double.

Lulu costs aroubd $10-11 per book so you could "reasonably" price your title at $14-15. Hmmm.

Don't forget too that you make half or a third the profit on print books so you actually don't want to sell that many.

Let's say Camphor can sell 10,000 copies of You...China. They would need to estimate that they could generate at least another 20-30% in sales for it to be worthwhile. And even then it would amount to less than an 5% extra profit. Better to spend your time pushing for extrs ebook sales.

The benefit of trad print is that you are highly visible in a bookstore. With POD that is not the case. You are highly visible online beside the same product for half the price.
“Everywhere else in the world is also really old” said Prof. Liu, a renowned historian at Beijing University. “We always learn that China has 5000 years of cultural heritage, and that therefore we are very special. It appears that other places also have some of this heritage stuff. And are also old. Like, really old.”

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Re: Book: You Don't Know China

Postby headhonchoII » 04 Jul 2014, 17:42

Congrats John on the excellent press you've been getting for this, sounds like a good read.

As an aside I could see a profitable franchise coming out of this.
You don't know...Pingdong. 'Once known only for beetlenut production and meth factories, this tropical jewel has more aces up it's sleeve than One Eyed Jack at the annual county poker competition....'
You don't know..Taoyuan. 'When one thinks of Taoyuan air crashes and dodgy architecture comes to mind, prepare to be shocked as the author delves deep into the history of this fascinating township ...'

This could be big. :)
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Re: Book: You Don't Know China

Postby Camphor Press » 04 Jul 2014, 17:59

Some good comments about print on demand. If we were not too concerned about quality we would just run a basic conversion for print, slap a cover on it, and get it out there. But from the beginning our emphasis has been on doing things right (hence the enormous amount of time we pour into editing and formatting the e-books). Formatting a print book (or at least, doing it properly) takes a lot of time, and is quite different from preparing it for e-readers.

Mucha Man's figures are pretty accurate. We will be running a trial with one book (TC Locke's Barbarian at the Gate) in the next couple of months via Createspace. In order to generate the same royalties as the e-book version we would need to price it at US$14.99 (NT$450—the e-book is currently NT$240), and Amazon charges $4.99 per order plus $4.99 per book for shipping to Taiwan. So if you order a single copy of TC's book and nothing else it's going to cost you $24.97 (or NT$750 in real money). Acceptable, but we would love to get the final price to readers lower than that and keep the same quality and distribution.

It would be fantastic if a Taiwanese printer was able to offer a full print-on-demand service, including packaging, postage, and returns. So far though we have been unable to find anyone able to offer this level of service here. To most local printers "print on demand" means an MOQ of 100 copies rather than their normal 500, and even those who offer genuine POD with a decent quality product don't want to touch the service side (processing orders and shipping them out). We're still looking at other options.
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Re: Book: You Don't Know China

Postby Maceck » 04 Jul 2014, 21:47

just bought it from Amazon.

Pretty good so far. $6.99.
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Commander Shears: That's just my point; here, there is no civilization.
Colonel Nicholson: Then we have the opportunity to introduce it.
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Re: Book: You Don't Know China

Postby Camphor Press » 22 Oct 2015, 15:50

The e-book of You Don't Know China is now just $2.99, so if you haven't got your copy yet, now's the time. Remember, if you're Taiwan-registered on Amazon and buy it there they'll charge you $2 extra, but if you buy through our website you pay $2.99 wherever you are.

We're also working on a paperback version, which will be out before Christmas.
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Re: Book: You Don't Know China

Postby Camphor Press » 12 Feb 2016, 19:18

You Don't Know China is now available to pre-order in paperback. From now until 29 February, get free shipping (normal shipping cost US$4) worldwide – just $11.99 for the book, delivered to your door. Books will ship on 1 March by surface post.

We accept credit card and PayPal on our site, but for those in Taiwan who want to use bank transfer, send us a PM for details.
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