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Siraya written language in 17th ~19th centuries

Moderator: hansioux

Siraya written language in 17th ~19th centuries

Postby sofun » 27 Oct 2014, 06:13

We used to use the roman alphabet to write before adopting Hanji. And we were bilingual. This part of our history is becoming well known in recent years. Those who are interested can google search using the keywords 新港文 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sinckan_Manuscripts )

It all began with the Dutch in Formosa, who were thoughtful enough to print the Bible bilingually.
Image
For larger scan please see http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/c ... ting_2.jpg

Looking at the footnote, we can see the English translation. This print is actually trilingual. The Dutch is printed in blackletter, the Sinkan and the English is in legible roman (again, very kind of the printer).
Where is the rest of this book? Maybe it's in the Netherlands?

Siraya is today's Tailam, Gohion
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Re: Siraya written language in 17th ~19th centuries

Postby hansioux » 27 Oct 2014, 09:57

The "alak in "ka na alak to David, ka na alak ti Abraham" means child or junior. In Sirayan societies today, Alak means junior male priest. It shares the proto-austronesian root word for child *aNak with many other Austronesian languages, such as Indonesian "anak", Tagalog "anák", Kapampangan "anák",
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Re: Siraya written language in 17th ~19th centuries

Postby Hokwongwei » 28 Oct 2014, 15:31

sofun wrote:Siraya is today's Tailam, Gohion


Shouldn't it be Takau?
This is a highly proper signature.
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Re: Siraya written language in 17th ~19th centuries

Postby Chris » 28 Oct 2014, 22:03

hansioux wrote:In Sirayan societies today

Today? I thought the language and culture have been extinct for a long time.
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Re: Siraya written language in 17th ~19th centuries

Postby hansioux » 22 Jan 2015, 12:45

Chris wrote:
hansioux wrote:In Sirayan societies today

Today? I thought the language and culture have been extinct for a long time.


If you recall the terrible mud-slide that happened to 小林村 Xiaolin village in Kaohsiung back in 2009, the village was mostly Sirayan. Most of its languages are restricted to specific religious use. They belonged to the Taivuan village (大武壟社) of the Sirayan tribe, and were forced relocated to Xiaolin by the Japanese. Before that they lived around present day Tainan and Kaohsiung.
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