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An English intro of Taiwan Aborigines by a Truku

Moderator: hansioux

An English intro of Taiwan Aborigines by a Truku

Postby hansioux » 22 Jul 2015, 11:22

http://www.ketagalanmedia.com/2015/07/0 ... s-peoples/

before the Japanese colonial rule, the indigenous peoples did not have the concept of individually owned land or private property. In our worldview, the land owns the person, not the other way around. The attitude towards land is one of humility and respect, and we see ourselves as living alongside the land. We are nothing more than guests on the land, and we see ourselves as stewarding the land for future generations. There is a saying in the Truku Tribe: “the land is blood, the mountain is home.” This stresses our reliance on our relationship with our land.


Ciwang Teyra is a Truku currently getting her PhD at the University of Washington. It's a great intro, and there are a few Truku stories and sayings in it that is less common in other such intros. Hopefully she would continue writing on the subject from her perspective.
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Re: An English intro of Taiwan Aborigines by a Truku

Postby marasan » 24 Jul 2015, 09:20

hansioux wrote:http://www.ketagalanmedia.com/2015/07/07/taiwanese-indigenous-peoples/

before the Japanese colonial rule, the indigenous peoples did not have the concept of individually owned land or private property. In our worldview, the land owns the person, not the other way around. The attitude towards land is one of humility and respect, and we see ourselves as living alongside the land. We are nothing more than guests on the land, and we see ourselves as stewarding the land for future generations. There is a saying in the Truku Tribe: “the land is blood, the mountain is home.” This stresses our reliance on our relationship with our land.


Ciwang Teyra is a Truku currently getting her PhD at the University of Washington. It's a great intro, and there are a few Truku stories and sayings in it that is less common in other such intros. Hopefully she would continue writing on the subject from her perspective.


Hey, that's great. There should be some type of blog or something that highlights the academic achievements of aborigines in Taiwan. They need some good role models in this area. I know an aborigine (I can't remember what tribe he's from now, though) who went to the US and did very well. He was involved politically for a while but now teaches at a high school. His English is just so incredible. I imagine with his laid-back view, he did much better in the US than his Han/native Taiwanese counterparts. For example, I don't know any other Taiwanese dude who studied in the US that greets me with a Californian handshake!
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