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Taiwan Temples: my new cultural project

Moderator: hansioux

Re: Taiwan Temples: my new cultural project

Postby Mucha Man » 28 Aug 2015, 12:01

We will be publishing across a variety of platforms including Google+

We are well over 300 likes and 1600 views on our first day.

Thanks to anyone who has checked it out.
“Everywhere else in the world is also really old” said Prof. Liu, a renowned historian at Beijing University. “We always learn that China has 5000 years of cultural heritage, and that therefore we are very special. It appears that other places also have some of this heritage stuff. And are also old. Like, really old.”

https://www.facebook.com/taiwantemples
Mucha Man
Guan Yin (Guānyīn)
 
Posts: 19980
{ AUTHOR_TOPIC }
Joined: 01 Nov 2001, 17:01
Location: Mucha, of course



Re: Taiwan Temples: my new cultural project

Postby BlownWideOpen » 28 Aug 2015, 13:09

All kidding aside, I love the intricate metal and wood work of a lot of these temples. The bright colors and paint job of the more sophisticated ones are very impressive
BlownWideOpen
Neighbour of the Beast
 
Posts: 667
Joined: 27 May 2015, 21:53
In Taiwan since: 03 Oct 2006



Re: Taiwan Temples: my new cultural project

Postby schwarzwald » 29 Aug 2015, 15:08

Not meaning to derail this interesting thread, but I have seen some temple rituals here where a big guy usually topless or in colorful robes, hits his forehead with sharp objects until the blood runs down, then others wipe the blood with ghost money. Can somebody explain the meaning of this?
schwarzwald
Shoe-wielding Legislator (huīwǔ xiézi de lìfǎ wěiyuán)
Shoe-wielding Legislator (huīwǔ xiézi de lìfǎ wěiyuán)
 
Posts: 296
Joined: 20 Aug 2005, 20:02



Re: Taiwan Temples: my new cultural project

Postby Mucha Man » 30 Aug 2015, 21:22

schwarzwald wrote:Not meaning to derail this interesting thread, but I have seen some temple rituals here where a big guy usually topless or in colorful robes, hits his forehead with sharp objects until the blood runs down, then others wipe the blood with ghost money. Can somebody explain the meaning of this?


I am guessing based on the description he is a thangki, a spirit medium and you saw him in the throes of spirit possession. It's very common to see this in Taiwan. The mediums are often just regular joes during the day.
“Everywhere else in the world is also really old” said Prof. Liu, a renowned historian at Beijing University. “We always learn that China has 5000 years of cultural heritage, and that therefore we are very special. It appears that other places also have some of this heritage stuff. And are also old. Like, really old.”

https://www.facebook.com/taiwantemples
Mucha Man
Guan Yin (Guānyīn)
 
Posts: 19980
{ AUTHOR_TOPIC }
Joined: 01 Nov 2001, 17:01
Location: Mucha, of course



Re: Taiwan Temples: my new cultural project

Postby Mucha Man » 30 Aug 2015, 21:27

An update on the project. We had a great weekend. Over 500 new followers, over 7000 views of the video, and a total post reach of almost 30,000. We got a mention in a Spanish art magazine's blog, a blog on art crime, and for some bizarre reason the University of Miami Liked our page.

Thanks so much if you went over to look at it. Still need to get it on Youtube so I can show it here. It is on Vimeo but I don't think that works.
“Everywhere else in the world is also really old” said Prof. Liu, a renowned historian at Beijing University. “We always learn that China has 5000 years of cultural heritage, and that therefore we are very special. It appears that other places also have some of this heritage stuff. And are also old. Like, really old.”

https://www.facebook.com/taiwantemples
Mucha Man
Guan Yin (Guānyīn)
 
Posts: 19980
{ AUTHOR_TOPIC }
Joined: 01 Nov 2001, 17:01
Location: Mucha, of course



Re: Taiwan Temples: my new cultural project

Postby schwarzwald » 31 Aug 2015, 07:27

Mucha Man wrote:
schwarzwald wrote:Not meaning to derail this interesting thread, but I have seen some temple rituals here where a big guy usually topless or in colorful robes, hits his forehead with sharp objects until the blood runs down, then others wipe the blood with ghost money. Can somebody explain the meaning of this?


I am guessing based on the description he is a thangki, a spirit medium and you saw him in the throes of spirit possession. It's very common to see this in Taiwan. The mediums are often just regular joes during the day.


Thanks for explaining, yes, that's what it it is, like this fellow.

http://cdn.c.photoshelter.com/img-get2/ ... Tangki.jpg
schwarzwald
Shoe-wielding Legislator (huīwǔ xiézi de lìfǎ wěiyuán)
Shoe-wielding Legislator (huīwǔ xiézi de lìfǎ wěiyuán)
 
Posts: 296
Joined: 20 Aug 2005, 20:02



Re: Taiwan Temples: new post on Donggang Boat Burning

Postby Mucha Man » 09 Oct 2015, 21:15

In case anyone is looking to go to the boat burning festival on Saturday night in Donggang, Pingdong County, we have a number of posts on the festival, including the latest which explains what will happen tomorrow night in detail.

https://www.facebook.com/taiwantemples
“Everywhere else in the world is also really old” said Prof. Liu, a renowned historian at Beijing University. “We always learn that China has 5000 years of cultural heritage, and that therefore we are very special. It appears that other places also have some of this heritage stuff. And are also old. Like, really old.”

https://www.facebook.com/taiwantemples
Mucha Man
Guan Yin (Guānyīn)
 
Posts: 19980
{ AUTHOR_TOPIC }
Joined: 01 Nov 2001, 17:01
Location: Mucha, of course



Re: Taiwan Temples: my new cultural project

Postby Chris » 09 Oct 2015, 22:27

I plan to be there, rain or shine!

Rain gear: check!
Foldable stool: check!
Camera: check!
HD video camera: check!
Monopod: check!
Phone recharger: check!

From 2006:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sw48uLiBmMQ
User avatar
Chris
Guan Yin (Guānyīn)
 
Posts: 16069
Joined: 08 Jun 2004, 15:51
Location: Taipei



Re: Taiwan Temples: my new cultural project

Postby Magnesium Sulphate » 09 Oct 2015, 23:01

Taiwan religion is a piety competition...
Magnesium Sulphate
Ink Still Wet in Passport (shífēn xīnshǒu)
Ink Still Wet in Passport (shífēn xīnshǒu)
 
Posts: 5
Joined: 08 Oct 2015, 22:22



Re: Taiwan Temples: my new cultural project

Postby Abacus » 09 Oct 2015, 23:45

Magnesium Sulphate wrote:Taiwan religion is a piety competition...


I find Taiwan religion strange. The biggest celebrations are all about chaos, noise and burning stuff (like the paper money). Typically religious celebrations tend to be quiet and peaceful and a time to reflect. I am sure that there are some equally raucous celebrations but in Taiwan it is an assault to the senses (primarily burning eyes and ringing ears).
Abacus
National Security Advisor (guójiā ānquán gùwèn)
National Security Advisor (guójiā ānquán gùwèn)
 
Posts: 4654
Joined: 20 Aug 2009, 08:14
Location: Kaohsiung



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