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What would you ask a temple manager?

Moderator: hansioux

Re: What would you ask a temple manager?

Postby tango42 » 18 Mar 2016, 01:40

It's obvious that you won't be asking any hard questions so.

How can you tell the difference visually between the different types of temples i.e. Buddhist, Tao, mixed, etc... ?
Or a slighty harder one,
How involved are politicians and/or organized crime involved in temples around Taiwan?
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Re: What would you ask a temple manager?

Postby hannes » 18 Mar 2016, 09:10

Maybe you could ask what role his temple plays in the community, not just as a place of worship, but also as a place of social gathering, community activities, charity work, etc. That's an important part of many Christian churches. Would be interesting to compare different religions in that regard.
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Re: What would you ask a temple manager?

Postby Ermintrude » 18 Mar 2016, 10:14

hannes wrote:Maybe you could ask what role his temple plays in the community, not just as a place of worship, but also as a place of social gathering, community activities, charity work, etc. That's an important part of many Christian churches. Would be interesting to compare different religions in that regard.


That's kind of what I was thinking. There seems to be a contrast between those very individualist religions where people baibai alone, and others where the key element is fellowship and communal stuff, such as church services. That's possibly an odd question to ask, coming as it does from a particular social construct on religion and a connection with morality.

I'd like to ask what the most 'popular' Gods are, and why. Has the manager seen a change during his tenure? What reasons might there be for this, if that isn't too leading a question.

And as someone who's fixated with the dark side, does he have any weird stories? Ghosts, happenings, creepy stuff? I would love to spend the night alone somewhere like Qingshan in Wanhua.
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Re: What would you ask a temple manager?

Postby Mucha Man » 18 Mar 2016, 11:07

tango42 wrote:It's obvious that you won't be asking any hard questions so.

How can you tell the difference visually between the different types of temples i.e. Buddhist, Tao, mixed, etc... ?
Or a slighty harder one,
How involved are politicians and/or organized crime involved in temples around Taiwan?


It's not a question of asking hard questions so much as my focus. I am more interested in daily life, duties, how they get elected and what power they have, the role in the community as others have said, and also the functions of this particular temple. It is one of those temples where people go to pray for wealth.

It also won't make for very good listening if the guy just talks abstractly about Taiwan and religion and politics. I want details about his particular temple and his particular job.

The role of organized crime and politicians in temples is well researched so I wouldn't be adding anything by asking one person questions that he wouldn't answer honestly in any case. We will likely ask about this (more about political influence) but it's not a focus.

As for your first question, please see Taiwan Lonely Planet. ;)
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Re: What would you ask a temple manager?

Postby Mucha Man » 18 Mar 2016, 11:14

Ermintrude wrote:
hannes wrote:Maybe you could ask what role his temple plays in the community, not just as a place of worship, but also as a place of social gathering, community activities, charity work, etc. That's an important part of many Christian churches. Would be interesting to compare different religions in that regard.


That's kind of what I was thinking. There seems to be a contrast between those very individualist religions where people baibai alone, and others where the key element is fellowship and communal stuff, such as church services. That's possibly an odd question to ask, coming as it does from a particular social construct on religion and a connection with morality.

I'd like to ask what the most 'popular' Gods are, and why. Has the manager seen a change during his tenure? What reasons might there be for this, if that isn't too leading a question.

And as someone who's fixated with the dark side, does he have any weird stories? Ghosts, happenings, creepy stuff? I would love to spend the night alone somewhere like Qingshan in Wanhua.


Thanks. These are all good questions and it's good to listen to what people are interested in. One of the best stories I ever heard when interviewing at a temple was from one gangster/politician committee member who had converted to the local god (Baogong, the god of justice) after a toothache. :lol:

They also told me some creepy stuff about a husband and wife murder-team and how one was haunted by the ghosts of his victims.

Taiwan's temples are repositories of good stories. Unfortunately the only ones who ever hear them usually are academics and the people who read academic books.
“Everywhere else in the world is also really old” said Prof. Liu, a renowned historian at Beijing University. “We always learn that China has 5000 years of cultural heritage, and that therefore we are very special. It appears that other places also have some of this heritage stuff. And are also old. Like, really old.”

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Re: What would you ask a temple manager?

Postby Ricarte » 21 Mar 2016, 11:35

Where can we listen to the interview, Mucha Man?
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Re: What would you ask a temple manager?

Postby Mucha Man » 21 Mar 2016, 11:58

Ricarte wrote:Where can we listen to the interview, Mucha Man?


When it's out I will post a link. We have another show on a god photographer on Soundcloud but we will move to iTunes once we get this next show out. It's going to be a little while though. I've got another big podcast project about to launch.

http://www.forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtopi ... u#p1723994
“Everywhere else in the world is also really old” said Prof. Liu, a renowned historian at Beijing University. “We always learn that China has 5000 years of cultural heritage, and that therefore we are very special. It appears that other places also have some of this heritage stuff. And are also old. Like, really old.”

https://www.facebook.com/taiwantemples
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Re: What would you ask a temple manager?

Postby Ricarte » 21 Mar 2016, 14:45

Mucha Man wrote:
Ricarte wrote:Where can we listen to the interview, Mucha Man?


When it's out I will post a link. We have another show on a god photographer on Soundcloud but we will move to iTunes once we get this next show out. It's going to be a little while though. I've got another big podcast project about to launch.

http://www.forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtopi ... u#p1723994


:thumbsup: :thumbsup: :thumbsup:
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