Books on Taiwan: something for everyone

Moderator: hansioux

Postby Bu Lai En » 21 Feb 2005, 22:38

Thanks for the post, I'm merging it into the 'Books On Taiwan' thread, where you'll find many more books to interest you.

Deny Roy's book:

Nowhere else will readers find such an even-handed, thorough, and accurate account of Taiwan's recent history.


That's an understatement. Nowhere else will you find a thorough account of Taiwan's recent history, period! :)

It is a very good book. My one little quibble is some of the early history seems plain wrong. But that's not his focus anyway - it's just background.

Brian
I have news. Good news from Notting Hill. The consignment of white gold for Mr Anderson has arrived.

http://theboolion.wordpress.com/ Image
Forumosan avatar
Bu Lai En
Thinking of Staging a Coup (xiǎng yào gǎo zhèng biàn)
Thinking of Staging a Coup (xiǎng yào gǎo zhèng biàn)
 
Posts: 6137
Joined: 12 Apr 2001, 16:01
Location: Finisterre
15 Recognized(s)



Postby maowang » 22 Feb 2005, 03:12

Hsu, Mutsu, 1991, Culture, Self and Adaptation: The Psychological Anthropology of Two Malayo-Polynesian Groups in Taiwan. Institute of Ethnology, Academia Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan. ISBN 957-9046-78-6.
This is a very interesting sudy, which highlights the contrasts between a Seediq community and and Amis community in Hualian and how both communities deal with the Taiwanese mainstream culture based on a traditional understanding of community. Hsu's study investigates the role traditional culture plays in social relations, crime, suicide, economy, education and adaptation.


ed. Harrell, Stevan & Huang Chun-chieh, 1994, Cultural Change in Postwar Taiwan. Westview Press Inc. ISBN 957-638-257-2
This is a groundbreaking compilation of essays regarding Taiwan's cultural change following the end of the Japanese era. Many of the questions of "culture" or "Culture" that are addressed in this volume are still being discussed today as Taiwan forges a new cultural understanding of Taiwan and Taiwaneseness. This book takes a thoughtful read to understand the definitions of culture the authors use to frame their studies, but anyone who would like to discuss Taiwanese culture should read this book. Essays include: Feminism, Painting, eco/ethnic tourism, commercial and popular religeon, Confucianism and the New Life Movement, poetry, self-identification, nationalisation of culture and a move from radical coservatism to liberalism of culture. READ IT!!

Campbell, Rev. William. 1915. Sketches of Formosa. Marshall Brothers Ltd. London, Edinburgh, New York, reprinted by SMC Publishing Inc 1996. ISBN 957-638-377-3
Another one of Cambell's books on Euro-American observations of Taiwan.

Norman, Jerry. 1988. Chinese. Cambridge University Press, United Kingdom, Cambridge, Tenth Printing 2004. ISBN 0-521-29653-6

This is a fantastic book on the development of sinitic languages from ancient to classical to modern. Jerry Norman served as the head of the Asian Languages Dept. at the University of Washington until his retirement in 1998 and in this book he creates an image of sinitic languages that is both easy to understand and informative. I bought this book for the work on Min, Hakka and Taiwanese languages. One detail Norman adds is the disparity between Hakka scholasic tradition and linguistic studies on Taiwan. Norman declares that, despite many attempts by Hakka scholars in Taiwan to cast the Hakka as a northern ethnic group that migrated south, there is little evidence to support that theory and the Hakka, share a linguistic association to both the Min and Yue languages. The Hakka of Taiwan, though, may be ethnic Shi people, who adopted Hakka languages later.

Li, Paul Jen-Kuei & Tsuchida Shigeru. 2001. Pazih Dictionary. Academia Sinica Institute of Linguistics, Taipei, Taiwan. ISBN 957-671-790-6

For anyone interested in the Pazih language this dictionary is essential. There is only one fluent speaker left in Puli, but the language is being taught to some children in AiLan (Puli). This book is most valuable in desciphering place names in the Taichung area, but doing so takes an understanding of Taiwanese as well.
maowang
Chair-throwing Legislator (rēng yǐzi de lìfǎ wěiyuán)
Chair-throwing Legislator (rēng yǐzi de lìfǎ wěiyuán)
 
Posts: 379
Joined: 29 May 2004, 10:00
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
1 Recognized(s)



Postby Shenme Niao » 22 Feb 2005, 06:38

Bu Lai En wrote:Thanks for the post, I'm merging it into the 'Books On Taiwan' thread, where you'll find many more books to interest you.


Thanks. Not sure how I missed that thread. Should it be a sticky thread?

What strikes me is that only a couple few decades ago, many of the
Forumosa posters would have been executed or sentenced to hard labor
for our opinions. I'm not entirely sure what life on the mainland is like,
or how Hong Kong is being digested, but they may have a hard time
assimilating Taiwan. Anyway, maybe thats why the Taiwanese seem
so genuinely nice and helpful: they're glad to finally be rid of martial law
and enjoying a time and place of relative prosperity and freedom.
There is a vast legacy of injustice here.
Forumosan avatar
Shenme Niao
Shoe-wielding Legislator (huīwǔ xiézi de lìfǎ wěiyuán)
Shoe-wielding Legislator (huīwǔ xiézi de lìfǎ wěiyuán)
 
Posts: 240
Joined: 24 Dec 2004, 16:20



Postby cranky laowai » 22 Feb 2005, 11:09

Shenme Niao wrote:Not sure how I missed that thread. Should it be a sticky thread?

Good idea.

Done.
Forumosan avatar
cranky laowai
National Security Advisor (guójiā ānquán gùwèn)
National Security Advisor (guójiā ānquán gùwèn)
 
Posts: 4693
Joined: 29 Jan 2001, 17:01
Location: Banqiao
37 Recommends(s)
41 Recognized(s)



Postby maowang » 22 Feb 2005, 14:50

I thought the old thread had been merged into this one and this was the MASTER thread for Book on Taiwan. I believe that was the prior concensus...
maowang
Chair-throwing Legislator (rēng yǐzi de lìfǎ wěiyuán)
Chair-throwing Legislator (rēng yǐzi de lìfǎ wěiyuán)
 
Posts: 379
Joined: 29 May 2004, 10:00
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
1 Recognized(s)



Postby Bu Lai En » 22 Feb 2005, 19:29

Maowang, the Harrell and Hsu books sound interesting. Do you buy online, or are they available in bookstores?

Brian
I have news. Good news from Notting Hill. The consignment of white gold for Mr Anderson has arrived.

http://theboolion.wordpress.com/ Image
Forumosan avatar
Bu Lai En
Thinking of Staging a Coup (xiǎng yào gǎo zhèng biàn)
Thinking of Staging a Coup (xiǎng yào gǎo zhèng biàn)
 
Posts: 6137
Joined: 12 Apr 2001, 16:01
Location: Finisterre
15 Recognized(s)



Postby maowang » 22 Feb 2005, 21:26

Taipei, at the Taiwan Bookstore near NTU... If you go, bring your Visa Card.
maowang
Chair-throwing Legislator (rēng yǐzi de lìfǎ wěiyuán)
Chair-throwing Legislator (rēng yǐzi de lìfǎ wěiyuán)
 
Posts: 379
Joined: 29 May 2004, 10:00
Location: Seattle, WA, USA
1 Recognized(s)



Postby Shenme Niao » 03 Mar 2005, 12:04

You can search for books at...

http://www.bestwebbuys.com/
http://www.addall.com/ good for out of print books (used.addall.com)
http://www.amazon.co.uk/ has slightly different books than US site

One of the ISBN's missing from above:
Formosa Betrayed
Author: George Kerr
Format: Hardcover (Reprint)
Publication Date: June 1976
Publisher: Da Capo Pr
ISBN: 0306707624
(I did find this on eMule)

This lets you search most govt/univ libraries on the island including the national library.
http://nbinet.ncl.edu.tw/search*cht/t
http://nbinet.ncl.edu.tw/search*cht/i
http://nbinet.ncl.edu.tw/screens/opacmenu.html in English

Has there been a discussion of how we expats can use libraries here?
Forumosan avatar
Shenme Niao
Shoe-wielding Legislator (huīwǔ xiézi de lìfǎ wěiyuán)
Shoe-wielding Legislator (huīwǔ xiézi de lìfǎ wěiyuán)
 
Posts: 240
Joined: 24 Dec 2004, 16:20



Topics Magazine

Postby Shenme Niao » 08 Mar 2005, 11:45

Well written articles in both English and Chinese about the current economy and business environment.
Practically a book if you stack them all up.

Seems to work better on Internet Explorer, and takes a while to load.

http://www.amcham.com.tw/publication_ta.php

You can get some of the printed back issues for free at the Community Service Center.
Forumosan avatar
Shenme Niao
Shoe-wielding Legislator (huīwǔ xiézi de lìfǎ wěiyuán)
Shoe-wielding Legislator (huīwǔ xiézi de lìfǎ wěiyuán)
 
Posts: 240
Joined: 24 Dec 2004, 16:20



Taiwanese American View of "Formosa Betrayed"

Postby momofping » 29 Mar 2005, 01:08

As a victim family of KMT's looting in Taiwan (Formosa) before 1947 "228 Massacre", I think "Formosa Betrayed" has painted a very detailed historical background for the tradedies many Taiwanese families had experienced. Even though I knew the loss of my Grandfather's jewelry store, I always thought it was only individual instead of large-scaled looting all over the island. I did not know those Chinese eyed on rich Formosan possessions long before they came. The KMT education had taught me to accept this event as inevitable power struggle and communists activities which were lies to cover up the true history. What saddened me the most was that I did not even know my father went to jail for years in my grandfather's place until days after my father's funeral. To many people, this part of history may seem old and too old to mention, but the pain remains in my heart each time Taiwan shows up in the TV news.
Lily Chung Bradberry
momofping
Ink Still Wet in Passport (shífēn xīnshǒu)
Ink Still Wet in Passport (shífēn xīnshǒu)
 
Posts: 4
Joined: 28 Mar 2005, 12:05
Location: Austin, TX



FRIENDLY REMINDER
   Please remember that Forumosa is not responsible for the content that appears on the other side of links that Forumosans post on our forums. As a discussion website, we encourage open and frank debate. We have learned that the most effective way to address questionable claims or accusations on Forumosa is by engaging in a sincere and constructive conversation. To make this website work, we must all feel safe in expressing our opinions, this also means backing up any claims with hard facts, including links to other websites.
   Please also remember that one should not believe everything one reads on the Internet, particularly from websites whose content cannot be easily verified or substantiated. Use your common sense and do not hesitate to ask for proof.
PreviousNext




Proceed to Culture & History



Who is online

Forumosans browsing this forum: No Forumosans and 1 visitor

No man is quick enough to enjoy life to the full -- SPANISH PROVERB