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Books on Taiwan: something for everyone

Moderator: hansioux

Re: Books on Taiwan: something for everyone

Postby Petrichor » 02 Mar 2015, 11:20

Taiwan Tales free for one week at Smashwords. Enter the code RW100 when you checkout. https://www.smashwords.com/books/view/522526
Use what talents you possess: The woods would be very silent if no birds sang there except those that sang best.

http://talesfromthebeautifulisle.blogspot.com/
http://jjgreenauthor.com/
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Petrichor
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Re: Books on Taiwan: something for everyone

Postby Petrichor » 21 Mar 2015, 06:41

Glowing review for Taiwan Tales at Taipei Times: http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/feat/ar ... 2003613878
Use what talents you possess: The woods would be very silent if no birds sang there except those that sang best.

http://talesfromthebeautifulisle.blogspot.com/
http://jjgreenauthor.com/
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Petrichor
Martyr's Shrine Guard (zhōngliècí wèibīng)
Martyr's Shrine Guard (zhōngliècí wèibīng)
 
Posts: 1702
Joined: 22 Dec 2008, 04:30
Location: Muzha



Re: Books on Taiwan: something for everyone

Postby Petrichor » 30 Jun 2015, 08:37

Paperbacks of Taiwan Tales are available for NT$300 at this Sunday's book launch:

The paperback of Taiwan Tales is being presented at ColorWolfStudio at Linsen N. Rd. Ln. 9 No 13 6F, Taipei, this Sunday 16.00 - 19.00. The event includes a sneak preview of the forthcoming anthology, Night Market. A panel of writers will answer questions and give readings.
Use what talents you possess: The woods would be very silent if no birds sang there except those that sang best.

http://talesfromthebeautifulisle.blogspot.com/
http://jjgreenauthor.com/
User avatar
Petrichor
Martyr's Shrine Guard (zhōngliècí wèibīng)
Martyr's Shrine Guard (zhōngliècí wèibīng)
 
Posts: 1702
Joined: 22 Dec 2008, 04:30
Location: Muzha



Re: Books On Taiwan: Something For Everyone

Postby Camphor Press » 28 Feb 2016, 18:53

maowang wrote:Sneider, Vern. 1953. A Pail of Oysters. New York, Putnam's Sons Publishing.
This is a fictional story, but the tale might as well be real to a Taiwanese. The story starts in near Lukang when KMT soldiers steal the god from a family and he is sent to bring it back. Much of the story focuses around an American newsman stationed in Taipei and how he learns Nationalist Taiwan is not what it seems. The true story behind the fiction is that Sneider met Ed Paine, an eye witness to the 228 massacre and Paine hooked Sneider up with his interpreter. The history is fuzzy, the places are not where they should be, but the story is more an allegory of 50's Taipei with the dreaded race track and deaths. This book is now considered rare following years of KMT student spies stealing it from libraries.

I thought that followers of this thread might like to know that after being out of print for six decades, we are rereleasing A Pail of Oysters today. See the dedicated thread for more details.
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