Mormons in Taiwan

Postby Tomas » 03 Nov 2003, 11:15

formosa wrote:almas john, the Mormons i met here in Korea last week told me that they cannot even read the newspapers overseas for two years? Tomas, is that true too? So they cannot read the China Post or TT while they are in Taiwan? Yikes! How do they get the news?

Tomas, your stories are great, thanks. You will be damned to Hell for telling us, but thanks. They really wear special underwear? OMIGOD! and that initiation ceremony is positively BONKERS SUPERNATURAL HOCUS POCUS. unbelieavble!

God bless you,f or being so honest to tell us the truth. I hope you do not suffer any negative repercussons from Mormons in Taiwan reading your posts...


Yes, it is true that missionaries are not allowed to read newspapers or non-church related magazines. They are cautioned to stay focused "on the Lord's work," and not become distracted by worldly issues.

The rest of your assertions are pretty out there. There is no English-teaching bonanza among the missionaries. There was no particular "target" when proseltizing, so I'm not sure where you're getting the idea thea missionaries only go after lonely, single people. The main goal was in fact families, as they are considered the bedrock of any church organization.

The emotional manipulation claim could be made of any organized religion, and bear in mind that these young missionaries are themselves victims of that manipulation. They honestly believe that they are doing the right thing, and doing it out of love and a sense of duty.

I don't feel badly about having introduced Mormonism to some people. I think that people are capable of making their own decisions about staying in or leaving the church, and most Taiwanese people I know who were at one time Mormons have no feelings of bitterness about the experience, so I'm not sure whether your getting the "emotional swindling" from. To be sure, some manipulation is involved, but not to the degree that you imply.

But then, if you weren't a little "out there," you wouldn't be our beloved formosa, now would you? :)
Tomas
Presidential Advisor (zǒng tǒng gù wèn)
Presidential Advisor (zǒng tǒng gù wèn)
 
Posts: 3110
Joined: 18 Oct 2002, 20:04
148 Recommends(s)
170 Recognized(s)



Postby Flicka » 03 Nov 2003, 11:22

formosa wrote: I have seen many Taiwanese and Koreans crying deep tears over this kind of extreme family and personal pressure -- all for a charlatan religion that we in the West know to be pure bullshit. Come one, Joe Smith found a golden bible in upstate New York?


Ouch, Formosa! Any religion that brought us Donnie and Marie, Ricky Schroeder of "The Champ" and "Silver Spoons" fame and The Jetts can't be all that bad.
I settled for my safety school.
Forumosan avatar
Flicka
Wild Chicken Bus Driver (yě jī chē sī jī)
Wild Chicken Bus Driver (yě jī chē sī jī)
 
Posts: 1987
Joined: 22 Jan 2002, 17:01
Location: Taipei County
1 Recommends(s)
6 Recognized(s)



Postby formosa » 03 Nov 2003, 11:28

But then, if you weren't a little "out there," you wouldn't be our beloved formosa, now would you? TRUE ENUF!

But, Tomas, one thing I don't understand, if you left the church because your mind opened up and you saw the world is more than the black and white picture the church shows its members, then why do you still defend its practices? In fact, the effed up your life, and you will now spend the rest of your life getting healthier. But why stick up for a sick church that practices mind control? Maybe because you can never leave the church entirely?

Yes, they do target lonley single people at post offices, in parks and in bookstores, all over Taiwan and Korea. Ask anyone on this board who has seen them in action. They also target families, but they work in pairs and they always target single people. maybe they never told you.

Anyway, Tomas, I still love you. you have a huge inherited heritage to get rid of. it will not be easy. mind control is subtle and vast.

just look at me, the victim of terrible mind control experiments on Planet Tune-Nep!

As for God, I know she is a black woman in Africa. It is where we all began. Eve.
formosa
 



Postby Jive Turkey » 03 Nov 2003, 11:41

I get as annoyed as anyone when I have to deal with a Mormon missionary. However, I have to give them respect when respect is due. Most of them come over to Taiwan when they are 18 to 20 years old. 99% of the LDS missionaries I knew had worked for a year after high school to finance their missions. I can't speak for anyone else, but I don't think I would have been able to make that kind of commitment at age 18. I think the object of their commitment is silly, but I still think it shows a lot of maturity on their part. I also think that these mission experiences probably exert a progressive influence on the Mormon church. They are going home with a broader view of the world, and I have met quite a few whose mission experiences led them to question their faith.
Jive Turkey
Immune to Breathalizers (jiǔ cèce bù chūlái)
Immune to Breathalizers (jiǔ cèce bù chūlái)
 
Posts: 2053
Joined: 22 Sep 2003, 16:24
Location: Donald Tsang's Magic Kingdom
19 Recognized(s)



Postby Closet Queen » 03 Nov 2003, 11:59

Jive Turkey wrote:I get as annoyed as anyone when I have to deal with a Mormon missionary. However, I have to give them respect when respect is due.


You might better give them your pity. Religions always prey on young and impressionable minds or tormented souls. It'smuch easier to sell hope to someone who's looking to buy it. Literally hundreds of Taiwan's mormons are young gay men who believe the mormon experience will "cure" them.
"Honey, I've blown a guy just to get him outta my house."
Forumosan avatar
Closet Queen
Combat Zone Mama-san (zhànqū māma sāng)
Combat Zone Mama-san (zhànqū māma sāng)
 
Posts: 1658
Joined: 17 May 2001, 16:01
Location: Taipei



Postby Alien » 03 Nov 2003, 12:22

Jive Turkey wrote: I also think that these mission experiences probably exert a progressive influence on the Mormon church. They are going home with a broader view of the world, and I have met quite a few whose mission experiences led them to question their faith.


So in order to keep the faith expanding, they're risking their flocks by sending them out there to get a 'broader view'. This may prove fatal. Actually, I'm surprised that LDS is going so strong in the US, but then again, they're probably all cocooned into their communities and the US is a scary place for youngsters who're on the religious fringe of society.

Tomas, you didn't answer my questions about divorce or about the financial and social benefits of being in a close-knit mormon community which I would guess keeps the smartest of folks well-entwined.
Alien
Lost Winning Lotto Ticket (zhòngjiǎng cǎiquàn nòngdiū le)
Lost Winning Lotto Ticket (zhòngjiǎng cǎiquàn nòngdiū le)
 
Posts: 2864
Joined: 16 May 2001, 16:01
Location: New York, NY
1 Recognized(s)



Postby wolf_reinhold » 03 Nov 2003, 13:27

Tomas, I have been interested in this: The garments (underwear) for men has various symbols on them. What are the symbols, where are they on the garments and what do they represent?

You watch a movie about Adam, God, Satan, and some of the early apostles, standing and sitting from time to time as you make convenants with God.

Not coming to a theater near you...and not starring Tom Cruise.
"Foreigners are just not as smart as we Chinese people."
Yen Ta-jen
Kinmen (Jinmen) deputy county commissioner
Quoted in the Taipei Times, June 27, 2001
Forumosan avatar
wolf_reinhold
"Drinks for the House!"
 
Posts: 4117
Joined: 01 May 2001, 16:01
Location: Chiang Mai, Thailand
2 Recognized(s)



Postby formosa » 03 Nov 2003, 13:32

Above poster wrote: "Literally hundreds of Taiwan's mormons are young gay men who believe the mormon experience will "cure" them."

Wowsers! IF this is true, this is a major story for the newspapers to investigate! How do u come by this info? is there some rumor among Taiwanese that Mormons can cure homos? If true, this news will be in the NEW YORK TIMEs tomorrow. But first, verify, can you? examples? dish!

Tomas, ever heard of this CURE issue?

My God, this might be the straw that broke the camel's back if true. I never heard of this before, but u know, formosa's way slow on the uptake! I just found out the Earth's not flat a few days ago. Life is one big long learning curve. did u know that SMILES is the longest word in the Englishy language?

Yes. ask me why.... and volunteer an answer!
formosa
 



Postby Tomas » 03 Nov 2003, 13:32

Alien wrote:
Jive Turkey wrote: I also think that these mission experiences probably exert a progressive influence on the Mormon church. They are going home with a broader view of the world, and I have met quite a few whose mission experiences led them to question their faith.


So in order to keep the faith expanding, they're risking their flocks by sending them out there to get a 'broader view'. This may prove fatal. Actually, I'm surprised that LDS is going so strong in the US, but then again, they're probably all cocooned into their communities and the US is a scary place for youngsters who're on the religious fringe of society.

Tomas, you didn't answer my questions about divorce or about the financial and social benefits of being in a close-knit mormon community which I would guess keeps the smartest of folks well-entwined.


The mission experience seldom leads people to question their faith. What causes some of us to reconsider the church is going out and experiencing real life (e.g. going to graduate school, getting a job, becoming close with non-members, experiencing difference points of view). These experiences can be very eye-opening, and can lead one to realize that a lot of what is taught by the church is wrong. The missionary experience is very much a fantasy existence in which you are soldier of God sent to fight the devil and save the souls of others. Most people only become more indoctrinated through their missionary experience. Those who question their faith because of it usually had trouble fitting in with the whole program, with all of its rules and discipline.

Okay Alien, sorry. A little thing called work keeps interfering.

Divorce is allowed in the Mormon church, though the elders typically frown upon it, except in cases of abuse or addiction. Yes, my ex-wife remarried, and yes to a Mormon. We had to get what's called a "temple divorce," which means that whereas when we were married we were sealed together forever, we are now "unsealed," which gave her the freedom to be sealed to another man. When the church asked me whether I would agree to the temple divorce, I laughed and said "With all due respect, don't you realize that if we don't want to be married to each other in this life, we sure as hell don't want to be hitched in the hearafter?" They didn't get the joke.

As for the "socialist system," I have no idea what you're talking about. There is a welfare system in place to take care of the poor who need food and clothing, but nobody but the poorest Mormons take advantage of it. There are also employment specialists in each ward (about 400 people make up a ward) who help those who need a job to find one, but there is nothing resembling socialism going on. The Mormons are very big on self-sufficiency and free enterprise, and typically quite thrifty, so there isn't much need for a security blanket (if one did in fact exist).

There was never any financial benefit to being Mormon, nor was there a security blanket, other than feeling that God would take care of you if you remained faithful. In fact, being a Mormon cost me about $10,000 of my hard earned dollars for my mission, plus 10% of every dollar I earned from the time I started working until the time I left the church. I don't regret paying what I did. The missionary experience was extremely rewarding (I work in Taiwan now because of it), and the tithes I paid went to pay for temples and churches that my relatives are now using to worship, and which I once used to worship.

Extremists such as polygamists are officially condemned by the church. I personally have no judgment of people who believe in polygamy, as long as the women are of legal age and are not abused in any way. Having said that, my take on polygamy is that I found keeping one wife happy to be enough of a challenge. I can't imagine wanting to have more than one wife :lol: .
Tomas
Presidential Advisor (zǒng tǒng gù wèn)
Presidential Advisor (zǒng tǒng gù wèn)
 
Posts: 3110
Joined: 18 Oct 2002, 20:04
148 Recommends(s)
170 Recognized(s)



Postby formosa » 03 Nov 2003, 13:34

maybe starrring tommy cruise, mr reinhold. cruisey is a scientology buff and that's close to brainwashed too. weird.
formosa
 



FRIENDLY REMINDER
   Please remember that Forumosa is not responsible for the content that appears on the other side of links that Forumosans post on our forums. As a discussion website, we encourage open and frank debate. We have learned that the most effective way to address questionable claims or accusations on Forumosa is by engaging in a sincere and constructive conversation. To make this website work, we must all feel safe in expressing our opinions, this also means backing up any claims with hard facts, including links to other websites.
   Please also remember that one should not believe everything one reads on the Internet, particularly from websites whose content cannot be easily verified or substantiated. Use your common sense and do not hesitate to ask for proof.
PreviousNext




Proceed to Religion & Spirituality



Who is online

Forumosans browsing this forum: No Forumosans and 2 visitors

The fear of death follows from the fear of life. A man who lives fully is prepared to die at any time -- MARK TWAIN