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Getting started in Taiwan: hybrid or full-on trail bike?

Taiwan is a cyclist's paradise, and here's the place to share your experiences, questions, and pictures!

Moderator: ranlee

Re: Getting started in Taiwan: hybrid or full-on trail bike?

Postby circleback » 07 Mar 2012, 17:56

There's a guy selling a TCX size M on Yahoo Auctions Taiwan. Looks like he's in Kaohsiung though.

http://tw.page.bid.yahoo.com/tw/auction/1225602609

Here is another one on sale on Ruten.com.tw (auctions site) He is in Taipei I believe. Same as above. TCX M size frame.

http://goods.ruten.com.tw/item/show?21105234342568

Hope this helps.

You should check out Taipei Cycle. Might find something there.
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Re: Getting started in Taiwan: hybrid or full-on trail bike?

Postby PaddyB » 07 Mar 2012, 20:36

circleback wrote:There's a guy selling a TCX size M on Yahoo Auctions Taiwan. Looks like he's in Kaohsiung though.

http://tw.page.bid.yahoo.com/tw/auction/1225602609

Here is another one on sale on Ruten.com.tw (auctions site) He is in Taipei I believe. Same as above. TCX M size frame.

http://goods.ruten.com.tw/item/show?21105234342568

Hope this helps.

You should check out Taipei Cycle. Might find something there.


I know I'm not really in any position to be overly picky here but the paint chips on that one TCX annoy me and also I read that the ride/comfort on the TCX isn't that great but I guess it's worth a try.

Also, Taipei Cycle, cool idea. That might give me some leads but I wonder - is it more oriented toward Taiwan retail or more toward Taiwan mfgrs that want to export stuff overseas? I could forsee finding lots of cool bikes that aren't sold here. That would frustrate me in the extreme. Have you been?

Oh and why no love from anyone for the more light-touring style bikes like the Masi Randonneur or Garneau LGS-CT? Too heavy? Not sporty enough?
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Re: Getting started in Taiwan: hybrid or full-on trail bike?

Postby flatlandr » 07 Mar 2012, 22:06

Get the Masi. Someone would have to know bikes to give it a second look if they were looking for a five finger discount. It's steel. It has eyelets for rack mounts. The shifters will be lower maintenance and once you get used to the sweet spots they'll be similar to click shift. Get the Masi.
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Re: Getting started in Taiwan: hybrid or full-on trail bike?

Postby trubadour » 10 Mar 2012, 16:58

off topic? this would be the most perfect straight bar'd bike available in tw today...

http://tw.page.bid.yahoo.com/tw/auction/e51478609
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Re: Getting started in Taiwan: hybrid or full-on trail bike?

Postby circleback » 10 Mar 2012, 19:54

Oddly enough I was just about to post a link to the same brand, but different model.

http://www.whytebikes.com/2012/bike_page.php?ModNo=W-1-037-12

I met these guys at the Taipei Cycle trade show, and they confirmed that their brand is available through a distributor unfortunately named of Acme. Nice bike for the road and occasional off road IMHO. It's got a long wheel base and stays so should be comfortable and very stable. Got rack mounts too. Looks like a great all-rounder. Not sure what the price would be though.
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Re: Getting started in Taiwan: hybrid or full-on trail bike?

Postby trubadour » 10 Mar 2012, 20:24

that's a sweet bike. would be perfect if the rear disc calipers were inside the rear triangle- keeps them out the way of panniers - they're both well nice
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Re: Getting started in Taiwan: hybrid or full-on trail bike?

Postby PaddyB » 10 Mar 2012, 20:54

circleback wrote:Oddly enough I was just about to post a link to the same brand, but different model.

http://www.whytebikes.com/2012/bike_page.php?ModNo=W-1-037-12

I met these guys at the Taipei Cycle trade show, and they confirmed that their brand is available through a distributor unfortunately named of Acme. Nice bike for the road and occasional off road IMHO. It's got a long wheel base and stays so should be comfortable and very stable. Got rack mounts too. Looks like a great all-rounder. Not sure what the price would be though.


Oooooie those Whyte bikes are something else! If we converted straight from GBP to TWD the King's Cross would be in the 36000 range and the Charing Cross in the 46000 range.

Seems like Whyte scanned my brain to design the Charing Cross. Geometry, weight, discs, mounts, spec, everything. Now THAT is my ideal first Taiwan bike. But the price, while quite fair, is about twice my budget. I'd deffo have to save up until later this year since I have student loans starting up again this month. And then what would I do in the meantime? There is no way to rent a decent bike and take my boy with me, AFAIK.

That Portobello looks like a distinct possibility too though, especially if I found some good barend grips or butterfly bars. But I was really hoping to avoid getting an alloy fork, I've consistently read that they arent nearly as good as carbon or steel on bad roads. I don't want to be getting namby pamby about choosing my route when I'm in the back country.

The "hmmmm......" continues.
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Re: Getting started in Taiwan: hybrid or full-on trail bike?

Postby trubadour » 11 Mar 2012, 12:48

it's alu, true but I had an alu fork on my CRX and previously on my FCR. The CRX was no problem whereas the FCR had quite a lot of jitter. I think the geometry was quite different on those bikes, with the FCR being more upfront. Also, the forks on the FCR were straight but on the CRX, a more relaxed curve. Made a lot of difference, not only because it encouraged a different riding style. With the CRX, I was usually carrying panniers. But unburdened it was just a great ride, too. Point being that the Whyte Portabello has a nice relaxed geometry (long wheel-base) and curved forks. And braise ons, and discs, and would be a great ride. Check out the reviews!

You might want to check these out (with carbon, forks) in person, have a ride!

http://tw.page.bid.yahoo.com/tw/auction/1226878962 (carbon fork, alu frame)

http://tw.page.bid.yahoo.com/tw/auction/f29134393 (alliance is carbon and alu)


These have great group sets, too. Bargins!
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Re: Getting started in Taiwan: hybrid or full-on trail bike?

Postby PaddyB » 11 Mar 2012, 19:26

Yeah those FCR's look like pretty decent bikes too. I'll have to keep them in mind if I go flat-bar (which I'm not dead set against but I'd rather have drops).

But man am I ever lusting after that Charing Cross. That's the first bike I've come across that makes me willing to even think about waiting a few months and upping my budget.

My one concern, other than money, is the gearing. Would that 36/46 compact double crankset do the trick for me?

I just dont see how that gearing would cut it in the mountains here. It's hard enough on a MTB or hybrid I can't imagine trying to do it with road bike gearing, especially with camping gear or a child seat in the back. It's one of the reasons I was looking at those cross/commuting/touring mongrels like the Masi Rando and Garneau CT, despite their roughly 12 kilograms of weight.

So let's say I got a CX bike, say the Whyte Charing Cross. How expensive would it be to switch out the FSA Gossamer for a Tiagra triple? Would anything else need to be changed (derailleurs)?

EDIT: I did a bit more research and it looks like changing to a triple would be prohibitively expensive. I also noticed that the cassette makes a big difference and the Charing Cross has an 11/30. That should give a bit more range on the hills yeah? Is there anything else you can change/tweak on a compact double for lower gearing (other than improving the 'engine' which will take some time)?
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Re: Getting started in Taiwan: hybrid or full-on trail bike?

Postby circleback » 13 Mar 2012, 00:40

EDIT: I did a bit more research and it looks like changing to a triple would be prohibitively expensive. I also noticed that the cassette makes a big difference and the Charing Cross has an 11/30. That should give a bit more range on the hills yeah? Is there anything else you can change/tweak on a compact double for lower gearing (other than improving the 'engine' which will take some time)?


Yea that's a bit of a problem there. Not sure how you'd get around that, except maybe getting a compact double then replacing the small chainring for an even smaller one. But I am not sure the rear derailer could handle it. Too bad it's not a triple. If you're planning on getting up steep slopes with a load, i.e. your kid in a bike seat, a mtb setup would probably be your best bet.
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