Bicycle Shops in Taipei

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Re: Bicycle Shops in Taipei

Postby urodacus » 11 Aug 2009, 19:10

They may be stronger at the corners, but the thin tubes can crack easily a la the C50 from Colnago (in a crash, but that's just as with any carbon tubed bike, lugged or not). I have not seen any particular evidence of stress cracks appearing more frequentlyat the edges of the lugs, but that's where they would appear on a straight gauge tube. But then, some of the older Colnago Carbitubos are still going, and that's a lugged frame. Colnago only does lugged carbon frames, I think, but I believe that a monocoque (properly designed and laid up) has the potential to be far stronger.

It is difficult to make generalisations, though, as there is far more variability in lay up techniques and the design skills of different manufacturers than with steel frames. Another problem is that you can only see the outermost layer of carbon, and you have no idea of what goes on underneath.

But Maunaloa does have a point that a CF frame will be more likely to collapse before a steel frame, or a Ti one, because they will eventually delaminate or corrode, at places like water bottle bosses and where perforations are made through the tube, like brake bosses, or the seat tube. Not within a year, and not all at the same rate, of course. Steer clear of magnesium frames for they have terrible corrosion problems (even with chrome overplating). CF does actually contribute to electrolytic corrosion against aluminum or steel if the outer plastic layer is rubbed off, as the carbon fibres are conductive.
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Re: Bicycle Shops in Taipei

Postby range » 12 Aug 2009, 17:41

At my LBS, they just received an '08 Pinarello Dogma. Maybe it's an '09, I'm not sure. It's not the new dogma, which is a monocoque carbon design, even stiffer and lighter than the Prince.

It's partially made out of magnesium and I had a hard time understanding why they made it. It had to do with being able to customize the frame to specif geometries, something for bigger and heavier riders, etc.

I was only impressed by the price. US MSRP is $5,500. I've just read an interesting review of the Cento Uno at BikeRadar, which makes me believe that the Kom might be a good idea. The Kom doesn't have internal cable routing, therefore it maintains more structural integrity vis-a-vis a frame that has cable routing.
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Re: Bicycle Shops in Taipei

Postby urodacus » 12 Aug 2009, 19:29

not so bad if you've built for it, but I would certainly avoid internal routing for any steel frame: the most perfect access route for sweat to the inside of your frame for very hidden rust to develop.


the KOM looks quite nice, but one wonders about the utility of internal cable routing on such a wide-framed bike.

OK, I read futher and found that theKOM does not have internal routing.

trisports.com wrote:The Kuota KOM has two fundamental differences from the Kuota Kredo Ultra road bike. First, it features external cable routing, therefore not as aerodynamic. However this eliminated the need for eyelets for internal routing and saves weight while preserving the integrity of the frame. Second, the KOM does not have an integrated seat mast. This save additional frame weight. These two differences mean although the Kuota Kredo is the best all around bike the Kuota KOM is going to outperform the Kuota Kredo in the mountains or other areas where weight is the key factor.
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Re: Bicycle Shops in Taipei

Postby nazmikarakoc » 14 Aug 2009, 13:32

If anyone need frame or parts for any brand, let me know. I can check for price. I am in Taichung but not a problem to ship things.

My hobby is bicycles and being in bicycle heaven here, i opened a small shop.
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Re: Bicycle Shops in Taipei

Postby jacktorrence » 22 Aug 2009, 18:04

Which of these stores would you guys recommend for a "full service"? I took my MTB to a store near my house and it cost $1500. That was to have the whole thing stripped down, BB removed and greased etc etc. I saw a thing on the news a few months ago and there was a store somewhere in Taipei offering the same service for $800. Didn't catch where it was. Any ideas?
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Re: Bicycle Shops in Taipei

Postby range » 23 Aug 2009, 17:46

Hi,
I can't speak for the Taipei shops, but the LBS near my house is very good for repairs. I only pay for parts, never for labor and they know their stuff. I didn't even buy my Giant Anthem 0 from them and they service it for free.

With LBS, it's all about creating a relationship with the store. I have been disappointed by the prices and general service I've received in Taipei. My store is located on Wunhua Rd, sec 2, right near exit 5, Jiangzicui, in Banqiao.
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Re: Bicycle Shops in Taipei

Postby range » 23 Aug 2009, 18:00

Yep, I read that about the KOM. No ISP and no internal cabling. Sounds like a good idea, because the Wilier Cento, Cento Uno and Cento Uno SL have got issues with the internal cabling. They don't shift cleanly. The only workaround, since the geometry remains unchanged this year, is to use external cabling.

It makes sense. If a frame hasn't got internal cabling, this means that it's more rigid and has a bit more structural integrity. The less holes it has, the better it is, since some of those carbon fiber walls are pretty thin.
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Re: Bicycle Shops in Taipei

Postby FSBDavy » 31 Oct 2009, 12:30

Anyone know of a friendly English speaking shop that also organizes rides? I'm near Da'an park, and hoping to find a 'home' cycling shop.

In the spirit of the OP:
Personally, I had a negative experience with the Giant shop near Da'an park (NE). In view of the other positive comments, perhaps I caught him on a bad day, but I found the service *very* disinterested. A new store on Fuxing just south of Da'an MRT (forgot the name) were polite and friendly, but then tried to bullpoo me when I took my bike there for a couple of small things. I also have had great experiences with Sean's in Tianmu, great and knowledgeable service without bs or selling more than I need, but alas it is a little far to be my regular FLCS (friendly local cycling store).
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Re: Bicycle Shops in Taipei

Postby nazmikarakoc » 09 Nov 2009, 16:05

FSBDavy wrote:Anyone know of a friendly English speaking shop that also organizes rides? I'm near Da'an park, and hoping to find a 'home' cycling shop.

In the spirit of the OP:
Personally, I had a negative experience with the Giant shop near Da'an park (NE). In view of the other positive comments, perhaps I caught him on a bad day, but I found the service *very* disinterested. A new store on Fuxing just south of Da'an MRT (forgot the name) were polite and friendly, but then tried to bullpoo me when I took my bike there for a couple of small things. I also have had great experiences with Sean's in Tianmu, great and knowledgeable service without bs or selling more than I need, but alas it is a little far to be my regular FLCS (friendly local cycling store).


I am moving to Taipei Neihu area and moving my bike / hobby shop to my house also. Welcome anytime need anything. I am mostly into service. I have some parts for sale but not much. I have many tool and equipment.
November end will be ready to operate and mostly weekend afternoons.
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Re: Bicycle Shops in Taipei

Postby urodacus » 10 Nov 2009, 15:33

The section of RuiGuang Road (Neihu district) near the flower market and just up the hill towards MinQuan has a whole slew of bikeshops that have opened within the last year. Specialized, RST, Orbea, Giant, and Merida flagship store. Good engrish spoken in the merida store.
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