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Becoming a journalist

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Re: Becoming a journalist

Postby joshuaintaiwan » 08 Dec 2011, 22:29

Border Security wrote:
joshuaintaiwan wrote:Is Mandarin really so important? Isn't it just a fad? Wouldn't you be better off reading some books about Chinese culture? Anyone speaks English anyway here, or so it seems


Being a reporter for one of the English dailies means basically being a translator, translating select stories from the Chinese version of your paper. There isn't much to local jouranalism.


But isn't that what Google Translate is for?
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Re: Becoming a journalist

Postby Border Security » 08 Dec 2011, 22:31

joshuaintaiwan wrote:
Border Security wrote:
joshuaintaiwan wrote:Is Mandarin really so important? Isn't it just a fad? Wouldn't you be better off reading some books about Chinese culture? Anyone speaks English anyway here, or so it seems


Being a reporter for one of the English dailies means basically being a translator, translating select stories from the Chinese version of your paper. There isn't much to local jouranalism.


But isn't that what Google Translate is for?


When you read the English papers, sometimes you'd swear that was what they used for the translating. Hmmm... I made a spelling mistake in my last post. I think I like it spelled that way...
Can I see your identification, please?
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Re: Becoming a journalist

Postby joshuaintaiwan » 08 Dec 2011, 22:34

If you don't want to work for the papers, are there alternative routes to pursue? How about travel writing? Features on subcultures (gay, lesbian)? Is there a market?
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Re: Becoming a journalist

Postby Steviebike » 08 Dec 2011, 22:52

Hi Joshuaintaiwan, I think you should first work on your journalistic experience, rather than becoming a journalist. Maybe start a blog of your own and write about Taiwan, although there are plenty enough, might be good to have a very specific view point etc etc.

Maybe you could consider a distance learning course in journalism? Enter competitions on writing. Just by typing in 'travel writing contest' you will see plenty of options.

Good luck.
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Re: Becoming a journalist

Postby joshuaintaiwan » 08 Dec 2011, 22:55

Steviebike wrote:Hi Joshuaintaiwan, I think you should first work on your journalistic experience, rather than becoming a journalist. Maybe start a blog of your own and write about Taiwan, although there are plenty enough, might be good to have a very specific view point etc etc.

Maybe you could consider a distance learning course in journalism? Enter competitions on writing. Just by typing in 'travel writing contest' you will see plenty of options.

Good luck.


Thanks a lot. So you are a newspaper copyeditor?
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Re: Becoming a journalist

Postby Steviebike » 08 Dec 2011, 22:56

joshuaintaiwan wrote:
Steviebike wrote:Hi Joshuaintaiwan, I think you should first work on your journalistic experience, rather than becoming a journalist. Maybe start a blog of your own and write about Taiwan, although there are plenty enough, might be good to have a very specific view point etc etc.

Maybe you could consider a distance learning course in journalism? Enter competitions on writing. Just by typing in 'travel writing contest' you will see plenty of options.

Good luck.


Thanks a lot. So you are a newspaper copyeditor?


:D No. I'm a designer (don't pick that as a career!).
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Re: Becoming a journalist

Postby jdsmith » 08 Dec 2011, 23:26

Is this maoman? :lol:
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Re: Becoming a journalist

Postby Funk500 » 08 Dec 2011, 23:37

I can't speak for newspapers or journalism if you are a foreigner, but I CAN tell you what it's like on TV here for local journalists, as Ladyfunk used to be a reporter/anchor.

The pay is indeed shite, the hours are ridiculously long( she would leave to start at 9am and regularly come back after 2am) and you are competing in probably the bitchiest work environment you'll ever come across.

There is also a lot of "who you know" and where you went to school.

If you really want to choose it as a career, I'd follow the suggestions above, or consider another country to start up.
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Re: Becoming a journalist

Postby Icon » 09 Dec 2011, 10:22

With the OPs attitude, and lack of Chinese, he's a shoo-in for certain publications (not naming names). Most just need, as said, a fax machine where they input Chinese/what passes for English on one side, and fills the pages on the other. Being so biased, as long as he can follow the line, he's all right.

But seriously, without experience -at least 2 years for the work permits- and at least basic Mandarin -for press conferences- he ain't going nowhere. And publications. But most importantly: guanxi, connections here or abroad.
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Re: Becoming a journalist

Postby milkalex » 09 Dec 2011, 10:39

well there is that German journalist who does freelance work and try to sell his work to German language media and he seems to be quite successful. He also does a lot of interviews for Radio Taiwan and he is running a successful blog. You can find his page in English here http://www.intaiwan.de. I agree it won't be easy to actually work for someone but freelance is no problem at all.. you just have to be creative and maybe the right contacts back home ;)
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