What to prepare before leaving?

Moderator: John

Re: What to prepare before leaving?

Postby Icon » 01 Jun 2012, 09:55

tango42 wrote:What happened to all that great information that was in this thread (posted by me and others) related to leaving Taiwan?

I went to a lot of work to put that together and contribute to this board and also to have that for a record as I didn't keep the information. At least put it in another thread.


Unfortunately, there was a big system glitch and the posts were lost, in spite of the daily backup :( . I am also sorry about that, I did not save most either, but I remember the list. The warnings about not quitting because of severance pay. There was also an important point mentioned regarding that you are entitled to a month of salary per year labored, but that there is a limit to the amount. This was also mentioned in a different thread. It looked bigger but the gist is there.

Moderator's note: yes, many posts were lost due to a system error. More info here: viewtopic.php?f=30&t=110442
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Re: What to prepare before leaving?

Postby PapaAzucar » 01 Jun 2012, 13:26

Icon wrote:What would be the best way to learn these technical skills? You do not know me, PapaAzucar, Icon is well skilled in many areas, but computers are my Aquilles' heel. As a matter of fact, anything with more than two buttons, but I am willing and able to learn. Can you point me in the right direction?

A good start is to check out Computex next week and see what the tech companies are doing, and learn the new "buzzwords". Make some contacts and network.

What tech skills to learn depends on your interest, and what the companies are looking for nowadays.

For example if you are into marketing, look up Search Engine Optimization (SEO) and social media marketing, mobile marketing, etc.
If you are interested in organization or management, look into Agile or Scrum.
If you are interested in content development, then learn the content management systems (CMS) like Wordpress, Joomla or Drupal, and look up content strategy or user experience (UX).
If you are interested in web programming, then look into programming using Javascript, PHP, HTML5 and CSS.
If you are a real hacker, look into Ruby/Rails, or other higher level programming languages and frameworks, or any tools related to devops.

Think in terms of which "buzzwords" to add to your résumé that companies are looking for nowadays. Good luck.
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Re: What to prepare before leaving?

Postby Isha » 01 Jun 2012, 15:38

If you have enough savings, taking a break and travel won't hurt.
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Re: What to prepare before leaving?

Postby Icon » 13 Jun 2012, 15:44

Found this cute article on facing unemployment, 100 pointers:
http://www.asiatechnews.com/100-smart-w ... nemployed/

Give your resume a makeover. If you haven’t looked for a job in awhile, you could probably stand to give your resume a little tweaking. Add your most current positions and give the whole thing a more modern, sleek layout. Create a plan for getting back into the workforce. With the job market tight, it can often take some pretty serious effort to find a new job. The first step should be to create a plan of attack, deciding what changes you need to make, how you’ll apply, and what you really want to do. Get an internship. Can’t get a job? See if you can get an internship instead. That will keep extended gaps off of your resume and ensure that you’re gaining experience while looking for more gainful employment. Do mock interviews. Don’t head into your interview unpracticed! Instead, review interview questions at home ahead of time so you’ll have solid answers to almost anything that comes up. Take advantage of networking opportunities.Since you don’t have to work, you have plenty of time to get connected with others. Take advantage of any networking opportunities offered to you, as you never know which will be the chance you’ve been waiting for. Follow up. If you’ve scored a much-coveted interview or have placed an application for a job you really want, don’t forget to follow up. It’ll make you look more interested in the position and will undoubtedly relieve some of your stress. Ask for advice. Not sure how to handle unemployment? Don’t be afraid to ask for advice. Head to the web, your business connections, or friends and family to get information about job leads, personal development, going back to school, and more. Learn how the hiring process works. Do you know how HR at major companies handles incoming resumes? If not, you might want to learn. Some scan resumes and cover letters for key words, which you’ll want to include (or exclude as the case may be) to help you gain an edge. Design amazing business cards. Leave everyone you meet something to remember you by, when you create standout business cards. Design them yourself, or ask a design-savvy friend to give you some help. Stay involved in your industry. Just because you’re not working doesn’t mean you should just drop out of your field. Stay involved with industry events, news, and chat so you won’t get left behind. Start at the bottom. Sometimes, coming back from unemployment means starting all over again at the bottom. Don’t let this get you down. Use it as an opportunity to learn and grow instead. Start your own business. For some, losing a job may be just the motivation they need to finally start the business they’ve always dreamed about. Take on small jobs. If you can’t find a long-term job, there’s no reason not to find shorter-term work in its place. Freelance, consult, or even do odd jobs to stay busy while you’re waiting for a break to come along. Work part time. If your industry offers part-time positions, try to find one. It might not cover all the bills, but it will keep you working and involved, which looks good to future employers. Don’t be afraid to take chances. Unemployment is scary, it’s true, but that’s no excuse not to be willing to take a few risks to get ahead. Those chances could pay off big, and help you get ahead in your career. Ask for help. No matter what kind of crisis you’re going through, you don’t have to do it alone. Reach out to friends, family, coworkers, and associates for help in getting back into the workplace. Temper desperation. There is nothing that will drive away potential employers faster than the smell of desperation. Even if you feel yourself become desperate, don’t let it show. Relax, step back, and address any opportunities calmly. Working on Yourself
Time off from work can give you a chance to work on you, free from the usual constraints. What’s more, becoming a better person may just help you get the job you want or start a new career.
"Lo urgente no deja tiempo para lo importante". Mafalda

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