Textbook Tosh

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Textbook Tosh

Postby Ducked » 13 Mar 2012, 12:45

From Q:Skills for Success 3, reading article on Formula1 sponsorship:-

"Cars race around the track with company logos stuck to the doors, hood and trunk"

I dunno much about F1, and hood (bonnet?) and trunk (boot?) are American English terms, but I'm pretty sure F1 cars don't have doors, and I wouldn't have thought they'd have hoods or trunks either.

Assuming I'm correct, this gets a moderately high reading on the textbook bollocksometer.

I quite like this kind of bollocks. I use it in my never ending search for the Great White Whale of critical thinking among my students.

Some day.....
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Re: Textbook Tosh

Postby PigBloodCake » 13 Mar 2012, 22:09

Ducked wrote:From Q:Skills for Success 3, reading article on Formula1 sponsorship:-

"Cars race around the track with company logos stuck to the doors, hood and trunk"

I dunno much about F1, and hood (bonnet?) and trunk (boot?) are American English terms, but I'm pretty sure F1 cars don't have doors, and I wouldn't have thought they'd have hoods or trunks either.

Assuming I'm correct, this gets a moderately high reading on the textbook bollocksometer.

I quite like this kind of bollocks. I use it in my never ending search for the Great White Whale of critical thinking among my students.

Some day.....


That's what you get when you mix NASCAR with F1 racing (facepalm).
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Re: Textbook Tosh

Postby urodacus » 13 Mar 2012, 22:10

Can we have some textbook Tash now?

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Re: Textbook Tosh

Postby Nuit » 08 Apr 2012, 19:37

Curious on this one: "the mouse is up the clock"

I'm happy with "the mouse ran up the clock", but would be saying "the mouse is on [top of] the clock", when it finally got there.
Is this correct English, just American English, or something else (eek!) ?
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Re: Textbook Tosh

Postby tsukinodeynatsu » 08 Apr 2012, 20:34

Nuit wrote:Curious on this one: "the mouse is up the clock"

I'm happy with "the mouse ran up the clock", but would be saying "the mouse is on [top of] the clock", when it finally got there.
Is this correct English, just American English, or something else (eek!) ?


We say similar things all the time in the UK. 'The mouse is up the clock' wouldn't mean it's on top of the clock, though, it would mean it's near the top of the clock but inside it. Like 'she's up the stairs' or 'up the tower' etc.
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Re: Textbook Tosh

Postby Nuit » 08 Apr 2012, 21:23

tsukinodeynatsu wrote:[We say similar things all the time in the UK. 'The mouse is up the clock' wouldn't mean it's on top of the clock, though, it would mean it's near the top of the clock but inside it. Like 'she's up the stairs' or 'up the tower' etc.


Mmm, and UK is where I'm from. But your examples don't sit well with me. 'She's upstairs", but not "she's up the stairs", or "she's gone / run up the tower."
Hold on, "she's up the hill" sounds fine though :s. Glad I don't teach this language!

Anyway, had another look at the book, and they've also got "the mouse is up the chair", with a pic of the mouse sitting on the chair. I think they're getting that wrong.
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Re: Textbook Tosh

Postby PigBloodCake » 08 Apr 2012, 21:56

Nuit wrote:Anyway, had another look at the book, and they've also got "the mouse is up the chair", with a pic of the mouse sitting on the chair. I think they're getting that wrong.


Person A: The mouse is up the chair.

Person B: Whose chair?

A: Mine.

B: Oh, so it's "up yours".

................
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Re: Textbook Tosh

Postby finley » 08 Apr 2012, 22:23

Anyway, had another look at the book, and they've also got "the mouse is up the chair", with a pic of the mouse sitting on the chair. I think they're getting that wrong.

Straight Chinglish. Translation of "上".
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Re: Textbook Tosh

Postby Nuit » 08 Apr 2012, 22:48

finley wrote:
Anyway, had another look at the book, and they've also got "the mouse is up the chair", with a pic of the mouse sitting on the chair. I think they're getting that wrong.

Straight Chinglish. Translation of "上".


Ah of course - I missed that, straight mistranslation. You're invited over for tea tomorrow, to tell the wife that. She won't listen to me.
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Re: Textbook Tosh

Postby E04teacherlin » 09 Apr 2012, 00:43

PigBloodCake wrote:
Nuit wrote:Anyway, had another look at the book, and they've also got "the mouse is up the chair", with a pic of the mouse sitting on the chair. I think they're getting that wrong.


Person A: The mouse is up the chair.

Person B: Whose chair?

A: Mine.

B: Oh, so it's "up yours".

................

I was thinking of a dumbass way to use 'up yours" and you beat me to the punch. Shame on you. :fume:
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