Sanctuary being torn down. We need your help!!! - click here for details
You can also visit TheSanctuaryTaiwan.org - click here to go to their contact page

Teaching in an English Village

Moderator: Tempo Gain

Teaching in an English Village

Postby Milkybar_Kid » 25 Apr 2012, 23:03

Hello,

I have done a brief search and found some useful information on here about working at an English village. In particular I have read some good threads by GuyInTaiwan.

I am just posting this to get a more up-to-date picture of what's going on in the English villages. I understand that their are many English villages all over Taiwan. I am mostly interested in working in the Kaohsiung English Village (which I believe is split over several schools).

Does anyone on here work at an English Village? I am thinking about putting in an application but I don't know if I am qualified to work in one as I am not a certified teacher. Therefore can I work at an English village with a spousal ARC and a CELTA teaching certificate?

I understand that it all works through Dewey and all of the associated BS that comes with that.

What attracts me is the schedule. 8am - 4pm Monday - Friday would allow me to get some part time teaching experience at an adult school on a night 6pm+. Is this schedule fixed or will I have to work late some nights?

Is the work pretty full-on? Ie taking the kids around the village for the whole 40 hours per week or is there some "down time" (meetings etc)?

Thanks
Milkybar_Kid
Newspaper Copyeditor (bàoshè biānjí)
Newspaper Copyeditor (bàoshè biānjí)
 
Posts: 402
ORIGINAL POSTER
Joined: 24 Apr 2010, 20:15
Location: 高雄
57 Recommends(s)
7 Recognized(s)



Re: Teaching in an English Village

Postby kjmillig » 26 Apr 2012, 08:15

To the best of my knowledge there are 3 English villages in Kaohsiung. Maybe they are all administered by Dewey, but not all nationwide are.
If the village is housed at a public school then by law you must have a teaching license from your country of origin. Celta, Delta, or TESOLwould not meet the requirement by law regardless of visa type. As far as I know Dewey will require an actual teaching certificate.
Most villages have a schedule where one will teach scenario rooms a set number of periods per week, and also teach some regular classes for the host school kids. Most have kids from other schools visit the village for a day, so you would be seeing different kids. There also is a LOT of repetition in the village scenarios. A teacher might be running the exact same sceanrio for 20 periods a week, maybe for a couple of months straight.
"When I see an adult on a bicycle, I do not despair for the future of the human race [except in Taiwan]. ~paraphrased from H.G. Wells
Forumosan avatar
kjmillig
Night Market Cop (yè shì tiáo zi)
Night Market Cop (yè shì tiáo zi)
 
Posts: 850
Joined: 21 Apr 2006, 03:48
Location: Umm...Taiwan, of course.
5 Recognized(s)



Re: Teaching in an English Village

Postby Puppet » 26 Apr 2012, 09:21

You also might get to teach 8 year olds how to use a credit card to check into a hotel room, something they may need if they ever get lost in an American city with nothing but their parents' credit card.

This post was recommended by 3 Forumosans: cloud13 (01 Sep 2014, 03:41), GuyInTaiwan (26 Apr 2012, 10:05), tomthorne (26 Apr 2012, 12:06)
Rating: 12%
Forumosan avatar
Puppet
Street Dog Chaser (zhuīgǎn liúlàng gǒu)
Street Dog Chaser (zhuīgǎn liúlàng gǒu)
 
Posts: 1255
Joined: 06 Nov 2006, 18:14
Location: Changhua
60 Recommends(s)
31 Recognized(s)



Re: Teaching in an English Village

Postby GuyInTaiwan » 26 Apr 2012, 10:03

Puppet wrote:You also might get to teach 8 year olds how to use a credit card to check into a hotel room, something they may need if they ever get lost in an American city with nothing but their parents' credit card.


Very droll. That about sums up the entire English village experience, really.
And you coming in to scold us all like some kind of sour-puss kindie assistant who favors olive cardigans and lemon drinks without sugar. -- Muzha Man

One sometimes gets the impression that the mere words "Socialism" and "Communism" draw towards them with magnetic force every fruit-juice drinker, nudist, sandal-wearer, sex-maniac, Quaker, "Nature Cure" quack, pacifist, and feminist in England. -- George Orwell
GuyInTaiwan
Entering Second Childhood (èrdù tóngnián qī)
Entering Second Childhood (èrdù tóngnián qī)
 
Posts: 7231
Joined: 10 Jun 2008, 23:01
341 Recommends(s)
273 Recognized(s)



Re: Teaching in an English Village

Postby tsukinodeynatsu » 26 Apr 2012, 13:01

Puppet wrote:You also might get to teach 8 year olds how to use a credit card to check into a hotel room, something they may need if they ever get lost in an American city with nothing but their parents' credit card.


Keeping in mind that this is Taiwan, that scenario is slightly more common than you would expect.

One of my tutoring students went to an English village a few weeks ago. He LOVED it. From the sounds of it I would have found it really boring, but I think it was partly because he got to get out and do something different (and his normal teacher is a monster) and partly because he had the best English in the class, so he was the 'helper/tutor'.
tsukinodeynatsu
Mandarin Marvel (Guóyǔ gāoshǒu)
Mandarin Marvel (Guóyǔ gāoshǒu)
 
Posts: 1816
Joined: 10 Jun 2009, 14:40
Location: Tainan
57 Recommends(s)
65 Recognized(s)



Re: Teaching in an English Village

Postby GuyInTaiwan » 26 Apr 2012, 13:11

tsuki: That's all well and good, but did he learn anything? How would anyone know? Did they measure him before and after? Does any of this justify the approximately 30 million NTD (1 million USD) it will take to set each English village up and run it for the first five years?

These things are essentially an amusement park. Nothing more. Why not build a petting zoo instead?
And you coming in to scold us all like some kind of sour-puss kindie assistant who favors olive cardigans and lemon drinks without sugar. -- Muzha Man

One sometimes gets the impression that the mere words "Socialism" and "Communism" draw towards them with magnetic force every fruit-juice drinker, nudist, sandal-wearer, sex-maniac, Quaker, "Nature Cure" quack, pacifist, and feminist in England. -- George Orwell
GuyInTaiwan
Entering Second Childhood (èrdù tóngnián qī)
Entering Second Childhood (èrdù tóngnián qī)
 
Posts: 7231
Joined: 10 Jun 2008, 23:01
341 Recommends(s)
273 Recognized(s)



Re: Teaching in an English Village

Postby superking » 26 Apr 2012, 13:34

GuyInTaiwan wrote:tsuki: That's all well and good, but did he learn anything? How would anyone know? Did they measure him before and after? Does any of this justify the approximately 30 million NTD (1 million USD) it will take to set each English village up and run it for the first five years?

These things are essentially an amusement park. Nothing more. Why not build a petting zoo instead?


I think in those places you have to disassociate yourself from certain aspects of what is considered a teacher. But the same could be levelled at working in the buxiban system. You don't necessarily have to care if the kids are really getting very much out of it save for some good times in the early evening. Essentially most jobs function through repetition. Acting the same part in a play five nights per week. Pulling the same rotten teeth out of the same hideous mouths. Taking tourists from one place to another in a shiny metal flying tin. Cleaning rooms. Cooking food. Fixing broken things. Recruiting people for other people. It is more a question of if you like the thing you go somewhere for 8 hours per day to repeat over and over. For many people there is safety and security in that repetition. And they don't then need to question the value to the customer. Does the dentist sigh when he pulls yet another tooth from rotten old Mrs Jones mouth? I suspect he thinks of the car it will help him to buy to drive around the wife he gets to bang once in a blue moon. Does the waitress sigh as another customer orders another cheeseburger? She probably thinks of the trip it will help her to make to see an old friend. or a book she will then buy.

If your job depresses you, then really you either need to frame the functionality of it in a way that you can cope with, or you need to take the plunge and try something new. Sure life is repetitive and materialistic, but it is also fleeting. Don't bog yourself down with something you don't like.

I don't really know why I am posting this. But if it makes any sense to anyone who reads it then I am happy. My tapping it out was hopefully not in vain. :D
There are millions of people in the world. And none of those people is an extra. They're all leads in their own stories.

If you lose one sense, your other senses are enhanced. That's why people with no sense of humour have an increased sense of self-importance.

This post was recommended by creztor (26 Apr 2012, 13:59)
Rating: 4%
superking
Lost Winning Lotto Ticket (zhòngjiǎng cǎiquàn nòngdiū le)
Lost Winning Lotto Ticket (zhòngjiǎng cǎiquàn nòngdiū le)
 
Posts: 2942
Joined: 19 Aug 2003, 05:05
91 Recommends(s)
330 Recognized(s)



Re: Teaching in an English Village

Postby GuyInTaiwan » 26 Apr 2012, 15:04

superking: I've done all manner of jobs in all manner of industries. I have found teaching to be both the best job by far and the worst job by far. When it's going well and you're making a difference, there are probably few jobs that can come close to it. On the other hand, it can be a living hell dealing with people at times. The English village was quite different to any other teaching job I've ever done though. In a normal teaching job or in a buxiban, you have longer term relationships with people. In a substitute teaching job, every single gig is different (different students, different classes/subjects).

The thing that was really hard (and unique) about teaching in the English village was that it was incredibly repetitive in terms of the actual material, but there was an immediacy about it. When I was eighteen, I worked in a plastics factory during summer. I did two jobs there. One was stacking 20kg sacks onto pallets. The other was loading up the machines that made the granules. In both cases, the work was extremely physically tiring (and it was in the Australian summer in a metal factory with hot machines), and the second job was dirty too. It was also incredibly repetitive. However, I could get in a groove with it and my mind could wander to other things, so the time actually went quickly after the first week or two. That's simply not available in an English village. You have to be right there in it mentally. When coupled with incredibly repetitive and simple things, it's brutal. Even to this day, almost two and a half years later, I can still say the dialogues we did in those scenarios word for word.
And you coming in to scold us all like some kind of sour-puss kindie assistant who favors olive cardigans and lemon drinks without sugar. -- Muzha Man

One sometimes gets the impression that the mere words "Socialism" and "Communism" draw towards them with magnetic force every fruit-juice drinker, nudist, sandal-wearer, sex-maniac, Quaker, "Nature Cure" quack, pacifist, and feminist in England. -- George Orwell

This post was recommended by cloud13 (01 Sep 2014, 03:41)
Rating: 4%
GuyInTaiwan
Entering Second Childhood (èrdù tóngnián qī)
Entering Second Childhood (èrdù tóngnián qī)
 
Posts: 7231
Joined: 10 Jun 2008, 23:01
341 Recommends(s)
273 Recognized(s)



Re: Teaching in an English Village

Postby tsukinodeynatsu » 26 Apr 2012, 16:32

I think to teach in an English Village you need the same mindset to teach in a summer camp.

Yes, you are there as a teacher. You are not actually supposed to be teaching.

Do as little material teaching as possible. What these camps and villages and whatnot are is a rare opportunity for the kids to let off some steam and have fun. Will they learn anything from the material? Very, very little. But they'll probably learn something more important about human interaction from their time with you, so while you're there be the very best example of a human that you can be. Make them have fun, care about them while they're in your room or in the corridors, do your best to let them have a good time because that's the whole point.

The saddest thing about them is that playtime and breaks need to be disguised as study opportunities before parents will let their kids chill out and be kids.
tsukinodeynatsu
Mandarin Marvel (Guóyǔ gāoshǒu)
Mandarin Marvel (Guóyǔ gāoshǒu)
 
Posts: 1816
Joined: 10 Jun 2009, 14:40
Location: Tainan
57 Recommends(s)
65 Recognized(s)



Re: Teaching in an English Village

Postby asiababy » 26 Apr 2012, 19:05

tsukinodeynatsu wrote:I think to teach in an English Village you need the same mindset to teach in a summer camp.

Yes, you are there as a teacher. You are not actually supposed to be teaching.

Do as little material teaching as possible. What these camps and villages and whatnot are is a rare opportunity for the kids to let off some steam and have fun. Will they learn anything from the material? Very, very little. But they'll probably learn something more important about human interaction from their time with you, so while you're there be the very best example of a human that you can be. Make them have fun, care about them while they're in your room or in the corridors, do your best to let them have a good time because that's the whole point.

The saddest thing about them is that playtime and breaks need to be disguised as study opportunities before parents will let their kids chill out and be kids.


Last year, I helped the 5th graders at my son's school prepare for this English Camp. After the whole experience, I am really angered by the amount of the money that has gone into this thing, and the ridiculousness of the concept. We were an invited school, and for preparation, we got four sides of A4 paper with vocabulary and dialog. This included sentences like: "I want to take a train from Vancouver to New York. What time does it leave?" We also had to teach money amounts like "Thirty three dollars and fifty nine cents. Are you paying by credit card?" When you think about this question, consider that these kids going to the camp have had two hours a week of English since Third Grade. They have not been introduced to any English names of countries, nor have they been near American money. So, I had five weeks (=five hours while the teachers are in their weekly meeting) to prepare the kids which included teaching them the geography of the USA and Canada, which included five random US cities and Vancouver (so they could take a train), as well as memorizing six sets of dialog and vocabulary, much of which they had not yet covered in class. There is no extra time allotted for English teachers to cover any of this material. We asked for flashcards, pictures, any activity suggestions, cloze dialogs, anything that teachers teaching the English Village might have, but there was NOTHING. So, every school taking part had to make all their extra preparation material. We found a few grammar and spelling errors on the four sheets but were told it couldn't be changed because it had already gone to print. I know other teachers in other areas prepared stuff but nobody wanted it, and this just highlights the disorganisation of the whole thing.

I also have to disagree about the part about just having fun and not learning anything. This COULD be a really good learning opportunity. As it is, there are prizes at the English Village and the kids really care about the chance to get a prize, as well as actually doing something useful. The kids I taught did learn something, but not every school has a parent willing/able to come in and prepare all the materials and then teach it, and as it doesn't fit within the pre-set curriculum, English teachers struggle to cover the material so all kids can be confident enough to have a good time. However, I would argue the money SHOULD go to schools like ours that have no English materials at all provided, or to the families that can't afford a CD player to let their kids hear the CD that comes with the school textbook. Or let schools run exchange days if it's about having fun and socialising. Or maybe that few million could be put into developing a decent elementary school English curriculum. It's just a misuse of so much money.

Ok, that's my rant as a disgruntled parent over. I also want to plead to teachers in the program to consider the kids if you can, when planning the materials. That little extra bit of work you do, those extra things you offer to support preparation, help a lot. Of course if you are not allowed to provide those, it just confirms my view that is a good idea gone bad.
Family-friendly events and destinations Taiwan-wide. http://kidzone-tw.blogspot.com/

This post was recommended by cloud13 (01 Sep 2014, 03:52)
Rating: 4%
asiababy
Martyr's Shrine Guard (zhōngliècí wèibīng)
Martyr's Shrine Guard (zhōngliècí wèibīng)
 
Posts: 1779
Joined: 17 Mar 2004, 11:56
Location: A hill in Keelung
2 Recommends(s)
46 Recognized(s)



FRIENDLY REMINDER
   Please remember that Forumosa is not responsible for the content that appears on the other side of links that Forumosans post on our forums. As a discussion website, we encourage open and frank debate. We have learned that the most effective way to address questionable claims or accusations on Forumosa is by engaging in a sincere and constructive conversation. To make this website work, we must all feel safe in expressing our opinions, this also means backing up any claims with hard facts, including links to other websites.
   Please also remember that one should not believe everything one reads on the Internet, particularly from websites whose content cannot be easily verified or substantiated. Use your common sense and do not hesitate to ask for proof.
Next




Proceed to Teaching English in Taiwan



Who is online

Forumosans browsing this forum: No Forumosans and 2 visitors

When one has a great deal to put into it, a day has a hundred pockets -- FRIEDRICH NIETZSCHE, Human, All Too Human