Translating your degree into Chinese and have it authenticated by the Taipei Representative Office

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Translating your degree into Chinese and have it authenticated by the Taipei Representative Office

Postby Chavvinawa » 10 Jul 2012, 05:09

New to this forum. Greetings to all!

I heard that all university degrees need to be translated into Chinese and then the Taipei Representative Office needs to authenticate them before employers in Taiwan would accept them. Did most of you do this before you landed in TWN?

Cheers!
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Re: Translating your degree into Chinese and have it authenticated by the Taipei Representative Office

Postby ādikarmika » 10 Jul 2012, 05:54

Welcome to the forum, Chavvinawa.

I may be wrong, but as I understand, the order is (1) get the authentication, and then (2) get the translation done. The official translation will include a translation of the authentication stamp.

The authentication has to be done by the Representative Office in the country where you got your degree. The translation can be done for a reasonable price in Taiwan.

It's not actually the employers you do this for. It's the government bureaucrats whom the employers must deal with in order to get you a work permit.
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Re: Translating your degree into Chinese and have it authenticated by the Taipei Representative Office

Postby Confuzius » 10 Jul 2012, 08:01

adikarmika wrote:
It's not actually the employers you do this for. It's the government bureaucrats whom the employers must deal with in order to get you a work permit.


Neither my wife nor myself got our degrees translated or certified, been here about a year, no problem getting (and due to the sheer amount, turning down) jobs. I have heard people on this forum talk about it too, but it does not seem to be a real requirement (as we both have our work permits and arc's through our employers as well).
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Re: Translating your degree into Chinese and have it authenticated by the Taipei Representative Office

Postby Ducked » 10 Jul 2012, 09:48

I think I was told I had to (a) get them "legalised" (I think that was the phrase used) by some UK govt legal entity (Solicitor General or just a Notary Public, I think the former but can't remember for sure), then (b) get them authenticated by the local TWG Representative office, then (c) get them translated. I think it had to come back to Taiwan in between (a) and (b) because they wouldn't send it to a third party. No copies accepted, original documents only.

Fuck that.

Overblown expensive hassle, further complicated by the separate legal systems of England and Scotland, so I didn't bother. Its surfaced from time to time but I've ignored it and its gone away.

More recently, when they briefly offered "permanent" status, it surfaced again, this time with the kicker that the actual content of my dissertations would have to be vetted by three accredited academics. That seems to have gone away too, though that might be because I pissed them off bitching and moaning about the English Summer Camp.
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Re: Translating your degree into Chinese and have it authenticated by the Taipei Representative Office

Postby Confuzius » 10 Jul 2012, 17:15

Ducked wrote:
More recently, when they briefly offered "permanent" status, it surfaced again, this time with the kicker that the actual content of my dissertations would have to be vetted by three accredited academics. That seems to have gone away too, though that might be because I pissed them off bitching and moaning about the English Summer Camp.


This is strange for a cpl reasons:

1. Wasn't it already vetted when you graduated?
2. Does it have to be a Taiwanese academic? I could call about a dozen American academics on my speed dial and they would vet it without even reading it since they know my work.
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Re: Translating your degree into Chinese and have it authenticated by the Taipei Representative Office

Postby Ducked » 11 Jul 2012, 09:37

Confuzius wrote:
Ducked wrote:
More recently, when they briefly offered "permanent" status, it surfaced again, this time with the kicker that the actual content of my dissertations would have to be vetted by three accredited academics. That seems to have gone away too, though that might be because I pissed them off bitching and moaning about the English Summer Camp.


This is strange for a cpl reasons:

1. Wasn't it already vetted when you graduated?
2. Does it have to be a Taiwanese academic? I could call about a dozen American academics on my speed dial and they would vet it without even reading it since they know my work.


Yes and, by clear implication, Yes.

I suppose they reserve the right to apply their own standards. Or perhaps, knowing what their own standards are, they reserve the right to be cautious about anyone elses.

One of my MSc's was so-so (2nd class distinction from, I suppose, a second or a third class university) and one was pretty crap (scraped pass from, I suppose, a first or second class university) but neither of them were remotely as awful as some of the stuff I've seen passed at a first class university here.
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Re: Translating your degree into Chinese and have it authenticated by the Taipei Representative Office

Postby aphasiac » 11 Jul 2012, 13:12

I honestly haven't heard of this requirement.

I wouldn't worry about it; If it is needed your school will let you know (and possibly do it for you).
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Re: Translating your degree into Chinese and have it authenticated by the Taipei Representative Office

Postby Confuzius » 11 Jul 2012, 15:32

Ducked wrote:
Confuzius wrote:
Ducked wrote:
More recently, when they briefly offered "permanent" status, it surfaced again, this time with the kicker that the actual content of my dissertations would have to be vetted by three accredited academics. That seems to have gone away too, though that might be because I pissed them off bitching and moaning about the English Summer Camp.


This is strange for a cpl reasons:

1. Wasn't it already vetted when you graduated?
2. Does it have to be a Taiwanese academic? I could call about a dozen American academics on my speed dial and they would vet it without even reading it since they know my work.


Yes and, by clear implication, Yes.

I suppose they reserve the right to apply their own standards. Or perhaps, knowing what their own standards are, they reserve the right to be cautious about anyone elses.

One of my MSc's was so-so (2nd class distinction from, I suppose, a second or a third class university) and one was pretty crap (scraped pass from, I suppose, a first or second class university) but neither of them were remotely as awful as some of the stuff I've seen passed at a first class university here.


My MA thesis is on an aramaic work from 12th century spain and the notion of the demonic contained therein.

Let them bastards in TW try to vet that :roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao:
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Re: Translating your degree into Chinese and have it authenticated by the Taipei Representative Office

Postby Chavvinawa » 12 Jul 2012, 18:29

Xiexie guys for all the info! I think it might just be worth getting my degree legalised/authenticated/translated by my TRO here in Scotland before I say cheerio to the rain in case the immigration is having a bad day when they get my application.
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Re: Translating your degree into Chinese and have it authenticated by the Taipei Representative Office

Postby Ducked » 13 Jul 2012, 09:57

Confuzius wrote:
Ducked wrote:
Confuzius wrote:
Ducked wrote:
More recently, when they briefly offered "permanent" status, it surfaced again, this time with the kicker that the actual content of my dissertations would have to be vetted by three accredited academics. That seems to have gone away too, though that might be because I pissed them off bitching and moaning about the English Summer Camp.


This is strange for a cpl reasons:

1. Wasn't it already vetted when you graduated?
2. Does it have to be a Taiwanese academic? I could call about a dozen American academics on my speed dial and they would vet it without even reading it since they know my work.


Yes and, by clear implication, Yes.

I suppose they reserve the right to apply their own standards. Or perhaps, knowing what their own standards are, they reserve the right to be cautious about anyone elses.

One of my MSc's was so-so (2nd class distinction from, I suppose, a second or a third class university) and one was pretty crap (scraped pass from, I suppose, a first or second class university) but neither of them were remotely as awful as some of the stuff I've seen passed at a first class university here.


My MA thesis is on an aramaic work from 12th century spain and the notion of the demonic contained therein.

Let them bastards in TW try to vet that :roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao:


I forgot "Jobs for the boys" which is probably also a factor. They didn't say they would actually read it. IIRC they only get 3 grand each.

Oh, and no caps on Aramaic or Spain?

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