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Teaching ESL as a non-native speaker... Advice?

Moderator: Tempo Gain

Re: Teaching ESL as a non-native speaker... Advice?

Postby PatrickCh1986 » 27 Jan 2014, 21:37

Hello guys,

this is my first post here.

I have been teaching English in China for 3 years now and I taught in Hong Kong for a year. I am a 27 year old German and I even got a work permit to teach English in Hong Kong.

My plan is to apply for the working holiday visa and fly to Taiwan at the end of February to teach there. I have sent some mails to a couple of training centers and it seems there is no problem. They are offering me 650 NTD per hour.

There should be no problem with that, right ?
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Re: Teaching ESL as a non-native speaker... Advice?

Postby Tempo Gain » 27 Jan 2014, 23:55

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Re: Teaching ESL as a non-native speaker... Advice?

Postby Charlie Jack » 29 Jan 2014, 09:26

PatrickCh1986 wrote:Hello guys,

this is my first post here.

I have been teaching English in China for 3 years now and I taught in Hong Kong for a year. I am a 27 year old German and I even got a work permit to teach English in Hong Kong.

My plan is to apply for the working holiday visa and fly to Taiwan at the end of February to teach there. I have sent some mails to a couple of training centers and it seems there is no problem. They are offering me 650 NTD per hour.

There should be no problem with that, right ?


I don't have any firsthand knowledge about this, but here's an excerpt from a post from 2011 in which a person from Germany with a working holiday visa asks about working in a cram school:

Hans89 wrote:Hi,

I'm a German citizen and native speaker, I have . . . a working holiday visa. That visa means I can take jobs for as many hours as I want, but they should be limited to 3 month each. Is there any chance I can teach English at a cram school or the like? Other jobs? I've been trying via email and phone to contact schools I found on tealit, no success so far, not even remotely.

Thanks...
http://www.forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtopi ... 5&t=100046

Here's one of the replies:

Loretta wrote:You're allowed to work, so they don't need to get a work permit for you. So they don't really need to worry about your nationality, from a legal perspective. (This is only an opinion, but it's as good as any other in a country where you can be jailed for writing a restaurant review.)

BUT, there are too many people chasing too few jobs. If you're poorly-informed, and not qualified to tell who has the weird accent and who doesn't, then why take a chance employing someone who doesn't fit the normal description? It's easier to take your pick of desperate Canadians.

I think you'll find it hard, whatever the legalities, just because you're not a standard teacher.

On the other hand, you could do private tutoring. Lots of people claim to be interested in learning German. In fact, I know one. Send me a PM.
http://www.forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtopi ... 3#p1310743

Please note that I don't have any opinion one way or the other about your likelihood of getting a job at a cram school. I just posted the above post excerpt and reply as samples. You might want to read that whole thread. And there are other threads about working holiday visas. If I recall rightly, one or more of them discuss what kind of work is permissible. Right now, I can't find the one I'm thinking about, and I'm running late for work, but I'll try to see if I can find it later today.

Hope this helps.
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Re: Teaching ESL as a non-native speaker... Advice?

Postby Charlie Jack » 29 Jan 2014, 11:26

Here's something from November of 2012 (if anyone has any knowledge of any changes made since then, I hope they post it in this thread):

Here's some general information from the Bureau of Consular Affairs:

Activities after Entrance
(1)Work permit not needed
As long as in accordance with the purpose of entry, working holiday makers may work legally during their stay in the Republic of China to earn their living expenses. However, they should not work for the same employer for more than 3 months (The working holiday visa holders from Korea, Japan, Canada and the U.K. are exempt from this limitation.) In accordance with Article 4 of “Regulations Governing the Permits for Employing Foreigners and Management”, working holiday visas issued by the ROC Embassy, Consulate and overseas missions shall be regarded as work permits. Therefore, visa holders do not need to apply for a work permit with the Council of Labor Affairs of the Executive Yuan. However, those who engage in professional or technical work shall meet the necessary qualification and laws of registration for practice required by the Republic of China. In addition, visa holders should not work for longer than the validity of the visa. For more information on related employment regulations, please log on to the website of the Bureau of Employment and Vocational Training of the Council of Labor Affairs of the Executive Yuan:
http://www.evta.gov.tw/eng/home/index.asp
http://www.boca.gov.tw/ct.asp?xItem=131 ... e=783&mp=2

I found a National Immigration Agency FAQ about work restrictions under the title "Taiwan-Japan Working Holiday Visa," but I haven't been able to find a restrictions-related FAQ that is explicitly, specifically about any of the other Working Holiday Programs. Anyway, here's what the "Taiwan-Japan Working Holiday Visa" FAQ says about work restrictions (last updated December 3, 2010):

Q: Are there issues to be aware of while working in Taiwan?
A: There is basically no restriction on what kind of job you can work for. However, working in a sex related establishment is forbidden.
http://www.immigration.gov.tw/ct.asp?xI ... 09&mp=T002

[Edit: I noticed that the link immediately above does not work at this time. Here is a link with the same information as the quote immediately above: http://www.immigration.gov.tw/ct.asp?xI ... 29989&mp=2 ]
http://www.forumosa.com/taiwan/viewtopi ... 0#p1474650

Again, you might want to read the thread that the above post came from.

Hope this helps.
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Re: Teaching ESL as a non-native speaker... Advice?

Postby Dadoweth » 18 Feb 2014, 14:35

Hello all,

I have read a lot of threads on teaching English in Taiwan and I am in more or less the same boat as the OP. I do not want to hijack the thread though, but I also don't want to flood the forum. My small question is whether things change once you have a master's degree? Will it then be legal for school to hire you then as a non-English-speaking-country-passport-holder?

Thanks in advance!
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Re: Teaching ESL as a non-native speaker... Advice?

Postby Icon » 18 Feb 2014, 14:42

No.

Only change would be if you get a passport from one of the 7. Or get married.

And for the last time: yes, they may hire you. Yes, they may even ferret a work permit. But you will not be under the same conditions as the rest of the English teachers. You will be paid less, and you will be more expendable. If you are desperate enough, be my guest. But with a MA of any sort, you have better luck -and better salary options- as a white collar worker, in any trade office, electronics company, importer/exporter business, etc.
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Re: Teaching ESL as a non-native speaker... Advice?

Postby Dadoweth » 18 Feb 2014, 15:04

Thank you very much Icon. A white collar job would have been my preference, but I do not know my chances of that. But that is for another thread. Thanks again for the quick response.
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Re: Teaching ESL as a non-native speaker... Advice?

Postby Icon » 18 Feb 2014, 16:16

Dadoweth wrote:Thank you very much Icon. A white collar job would have been my preference, but I do not know my chances of that. But that is for another thread. Thanks again for the quick response.


If you have the two year experience requisite, very good indeed. Or come here as a student, if you do not have an MA yet, and get your foot in through college connections, if you really want to make inroads here. If there is a will and all that jazz.
Lo urgente no deja tiempo para lo importante. Mafalda.

None of us are getting out of here alive, so please stop treating yourself like an after thought. Eat the delicious food. Walk in the sunshine. Jump in the ocean. Say the truth that you’re carrying in your heart like hidden treasure. Be silly. Be kind. Be weird. There’s no time for anything else.
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Re: Teaching ESL as a non-native speaker... Advice?

Postby Svetik177 » 25 Mar 2016, 00:00

You guys seem to know quite a bit of teaching English in Taiwan . I didn't read this entire thread and don't really want to get involved in this which seems quite old discussion, but I was wondering if you could help me with my question. I am not a native English speaker . I do have APRC and open work permit. I saw you mentioning it a few times on this forum that anyone with APRC can teach English. Do you have any government website links that support that ? In English or Chinese would work. Also does it mean that any English teaching buxiban is allowed to legally hire me to teach English ? My boss seem not to be able to find any information on that and they are afraid that if any government inspection comes they will get in trouble . I would really appreciate any help , especially links to some online laws or regulations that I could print out and show to my boss as well as protect myself .
Thank you
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