Click here to go to our new forums at http://tw.forumosa.com
If you are a Forumosan Regular, when you log in for the FIRST TIME, you must RESET your password by using the Password Recovery system.

Usernames on the new forums must not contain any SPACES and must end with LETTER or a NUMBER; if yours does, you will be prompted to change your Username
Contact us at admin(at)forumosa(dot)com or @forumosa on Twitter or on our Facebook Page if you have any questions or problems logging back in

The newbie thread

Moderator: Tempo Gain

Re: Total noob: How do I get started?

Postby Lili » 24 Jun 2011, 12:12

sydbristow13 wrote:I've also been actively looking for work for the past 3 weeks and no luck. I have experience working with young kids, but every time I show up or call and they ask if I specifically have teaching experience and I say no they just say "we'll look at your resume" and never call back.

Why don't you just lie?
You can't just put some name of some school in your home town and say you taught ESL?
How could they possibly check such a thing?

I could see it being relatively easy for me to come up with some half-assed believable story since in NYC everyone knows there are tons of immigrants, but if you come from a middle-of-no-where place I could see how that might be difficult. Just lie. Say you taught in some Gulf country or something. What's the difference? From what I understand, they hand you the lesson plans anyway so its not like they'll be testing you on "well, show us your skills!"
"I wanted to be puzzled and charmed, to experience the endless, beguiling variety of a continent where you can board a train and an hour later be somewhere where the inhabitants speak a different language, eat different foods, work different hours, live lives that are at once so different and yet so oddly similar. I wanted to be a tourist," Bill Bryson.
"...But I ended up in Taiwan," Lili.

Never underestimate how much assistance,
how much satisfaction,
how much comfort,
how much soul and transcendence there might be
in a cold bottle of beer.
-Tom Robbins
User avatar
Lili
Eldest Grandchild (zhǎngsūn)
Eldest Grandchild (zhǎngsūn)
 
Posts: 1197
Joined: 22 Jan 2011, 14:13
Location: Taipei



Re: The newbie thread

Postby NickLane » 12 Jul 2011, 20:33

Hi,

I'm going to be moving to Taichung in late August/early September to teach English. Just wondering if anyone had any words of advice when it came to the big move/adapting to life in Taiwan. I've also heard horror stories about the traffic in Taiwan, but heard its quite easy to get used to, is that true?
NickLane
Ink Still Wet in Passport (shífēn xīnshǒu)
Ink Still Wet in Passport (shífēn xīnshǒu)
 
Posts: 18
Joined: 07 Jun 2011, 22:35
Location: Taichung, Beitun District



Re: The newbie thread

Postby solarlion » 24 Jul 2011, 05:30

Hi,

I will be coming to Taiwan around September 1. What cities have the most jobs teaching English?
solarlion
Ink Still Wet in Passport (shífēn xīnshǒu)
Ink Still Wet in Passport (shífēn xīnshǒu)
 
Posts: 4
Joined: 22 Jul 2011, 14:58



Re: The newbie thread

Postby Lili » 24 Jul 2011, 07:41

NickLane wrote:Hi,

I'm going to be moving to Taichung in late August/early September to teach English. Just wondering if anyone had any words of advice when it came to the big move/adapting to life in Taiwan. I've also heard horror stories about the traffic in Taiwan, but heard its quite easy to get used to, is that true?

I hear traffic is awful most places (Italy, India, Peru (Experience: Do not drive in Peru). It seems like America and Western Europen are the few places where traffic isn't "deadly".
So its probably not going to be an issue for you unless you're on a scooter. If you check around the forum, most seem of the opinion that riding a scooter is unnecessarily dangerous in the cities.

Did you know that teaching English positions usually open up early August? Therefore by early September you'll be missing the peak opportunity time. Try to get to Taiwan before late August.

I'm not in Taiwan yet, but here is what I've learned so far in my preparation for the move.
Also depends on where you're coming from. For example, I'm from NY and I think the hardest part for me will be the fact that decent, real milk is near impossible to come by. And also that its cheaper to eat out than in. I need my cereal/eggs, bacon, toast, and whole milk+coffee in the morning damnit.
"I wanted to be puzzled and charmed, to experience the endless, beguiling variety of a continent where you can board a train and an hour later be somewhere where the inhabitants speak a different language, eat different foods, work different hours, live lives that are at once so different and yet so oddly similar. I wanted to be a tourist," Bill Bryson.
"...But I ended up in Taiwan," Lili.

Never underestimate how much assistance,
how much satisfaction,
how much comfort,
how much soul and transcendence there might be
in a cold bottle of beer.
-Tom Robbins
User avatar
Lili
Eldest Grandchild (zhǎngsūn)
Eldest Grandchild (zhǎngsūn)
 
Posts: 1197
Joined: 22 Jan 2011, 14:13
Location: Taipei



Re: The newbie thread

Postby jimipresley » 24 Jul 2011, 10:10

Gladiator wrote:.


.

Fascinating.
You can live here and have a great life and not be the least bit into living the local life. Clowns will try to diss you for it saying you gotta get down with the program, but fuck em, treat this place like a buffet and yous be on a diet. Take what you want and nothing extra, slam those oysters, but leave the bread sticks and dinner rolls behind. - Deuce Dropper

I'm much more of a nasty rotter in real life, especially with vapid or vacuous verbiage from the ill read & intellectually challenged. - TheGingerMan

Don't be a cheap cunt. - Deuce Dropper
User avatar
jimipresley
Maitreya Buddha (Mílèfó)
 
Posts: 10914
Joined: 06 Dec 2004, 18:23
Location: The Abyss. Awaiting YOUR company.
In Taiwan since: 07 Apr 2001



Re: The newbie thread

Postby NickLane » 25 Jul 2011, 23:38

Lili wrote:
NickLane wrote:Hi,

I'm going to be moving to Taichung in late August/early September to teach English. Just wondering if anyone had any words of advice when it came to the big move/adapting to life in Taiwan. I've also heard horror stories about the traffic in Taiwan, but heard its quite easy to get used to, is that true?

I hear traffic is awful most places (Italy, India, Peru (Experience: Do not drive in Peru). It seems like America and Western Europen are the few places where traffic isn't "deadly".
So its probably not going to be an issue for you unless you're on a scooter. If you check around the forum, most seem of the opinion that riding a scooter is unnecessarily dangerous in the cities.

Did you know that teaching English positions usually open up early August? Therefore by early September you'll be missing the peak opportunity time. Try to get to Taiwan before late August.

I'm not in Taiwan yet, but here is what I've learned so far in my preparation for the move.
Also depends on where you're coming from. For example, I'm from NY and I think the hardest part for me will be the fact that decent, real milk is near impossible to come by. And also that its cheaper to eat out than in. I need my cereal/eggs, bacon, toast, and whole milk+coffee in the morning damnit.



I'm teaching through Shane for the first year. They've organized a start on the 5th of September through to the 8th.

Cheers for the info!
NickLane
Ink Still Wet in Passport (shífēn xīnshǒu)
Ink Still Wet in Passport (shífēn xīnshǒu)
 
Posts: 18
Joined: 07 Jun 2011, 22:35
Location: Taichung, Beitun District



Re: Total noob: How do I get started?

Postby Bluefish Consulting » 30 Oct 2011, 00:09

Dougster wrote:To be honest, adult teaching buxibans are few and far between.


David's English (大衛美語) is an adult cram school that can offer you an ARC. Both group and one-on-one classes available.
They have seven branches in and around Taipei, and they're also in Taoyuan, Zhongli, Hsinchu, Tainan and Kaohsiung.

I've worked at Taipei City's Fuxing branch for about a year now, and it's pretty good.
They don't sponsor my ARC, however, so you'd have to contact them about that.

http://www.david.com.tw/
http://www.david.com.tw/index.php?do=contact
Bluefish Consulting
Ink Still Wet in Passport (shífēn xīnshǒu)
Ink Still Wet in Passport (shífēn xīnshǒu)
 
Posts: 10
Joined: 15 Jun 2011, 00:34



Re: Total noob: How do I get started?

Postby Bluefish Consulting » 30 Oct 2011, 00:13

ailun wrote:So what's the best time to be looking for a teaching job for the next semester, Spring 2011? I guess it starts about a week after Chinese New Years (03 Feb this year).


If you try to contact people around three or four weeks before the Chinese new year, they will most likely tell you to contact them again after the holiday, when it's back to business as usual.
Bluefish Consulting
Ink Still Wet in Passport (shífēn xīnshǒu)
Ink Still Wet in Passport (shífēn xīnshǒu)
 
Posts: 10
Joined: 15 Jun 2011, 00:34



Re: Total noob: How do I get started?

Postby Bluefish Consulting » 30 Oct 2011, 00:20

Begemot wrote:Does it make sense to just go to schools, hiring or not and push my resume? I have very little teaching experience and wouldn't really want to work illegally.


Totally! Showing your charm is better in person anyway!
If the decision maker isn't there, find out when they will be and go back. They will notice your persistence.

Meanwhile, think of what other experiences you have that could help you find a teaching job. Working with kids, at community centers, organizing groups, etc.
Lay it out for them and show confidence that you can do it.
Bluefish Consulting
Ink Still Wet in Passport (shífēn xīnshǒu)
Ink Still Wet in Passport (shífēn xīnshǒu)
 
Posts: 10
Joined: 15 Jun 2011, 00:34



Re: Total noob: How do I get started?

Postby DINGO DEANS » 30 Oct 2011, 11:18

Lili wrote:Why don't you just lie? You can't just put some name of some school in your home town and say you taught ESL?
How could they possibly check such a thing?

I could see it being relatively easy for me to come up with some half-assed believable story since in NYC everyone knows there are tons of immigrants, but if you come from a middle-of-no-where place I could see how that might be difficult. Just lie. Say you taught in some Gulf country or something. What's the difference? From what I understand, they hand you the lesson plans anyway so its not like they'll be testing you on "well, show us your skills!"


So you are suggesting that people creat fraudulent documents? You know that is a serious criminal offence in Taiwan.

How could they check, the email or call the school.
User avatar
DINGO DEANS
Grasshopper (cǎo měng)
 
Posts: 92
Joined: 20 Oct 2011, 12:36



FRIENDLY REMINDER
   Please remember that Forumosa is not responsible for the content that appears on the other side of links that Forumosans post on our forums. As a discussion website, we encourage open and frank debate. We have learned that the most effective way to address questionable claims or accusations on Forumosa is by engaging in a sincere and constructive conversation. To make this website work, we must all feel safe in expressing our opinions, this also means backing up any claims with hard facts, including links to other websites.
   Please also remember that one should not believe everything one reads on the Internet, particularly from websites whose content cannot be easily verified or substantiated. Use your common sense and do not hesitate to ask for proof.
PreviousNext




Return to Teaching English in Taiwan



Who is online

Forumosans browsing this forum: No Forumosans and 0 guests

cron