Human Rights in Taiwan, GIO website

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Human Rights in Taiwan, GIO website

Postby Hartzell » 14 Oct 2001, 12:25

The Government Information Office here in Taiwan has put up a Human Rights website at http://www.gio.gov.tw/taiwan-website/5-gp/rights/preface.htm

It is interesting to read through all the articles there, however I could not find any references to "foreigners".

Could it be that the ROC government does not consider foreigners to be human beings, and hence does not include them in any discussion of human rights?

What do you think?
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Human Rights in Taiwan, GIO website

Postby Anonymous » 14 Oct 2001, 13:13

Window dressing.. most Taiwanese know what it is..but don't have a clue how it works..too many years of the KMT.
They seem to know how to write these big words that sound good ie (human rights dignity) but don't know what they mean

Also, they must have really got the thesaurus out for writing this website
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Postby DDE11678 » 15 Oct 2001, 00:47

Taiwan's lack of fair treatment for foreigners is absolutely abyssmal ... especially considering the amount of capital and military support the West, in particular the United States, has pumped into Taiwan since the early 1950's. I have a good connection with a Congressman back in the States, and have thought about putting together a letter explaining the grievances of the foreign community in Taiwan in regards to how we're treated by the gov't, police, etc., and then forwarding it to the Congressman with as many signatures as possible. It seems as though there's not much we can do from this end in terms of petitioning the Taiwanese government, but perhaps a little high-placed pressure from Taiwan's most important Western ally could have some effect ... Richard, have you ever thought about anything like this, and/or would you be interested in working with me on it???
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Postby Hartzell » 16 Oct 2001, 00:20

Yes, I would be very much interested in everyone's comments about the human rights situation of foreigners in Taiwan.

Please post your comments to this topic on our Human Rights Forum. Thanks.
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Human Rights in Taiwan, GIO website

Postby Alien » 16 Oct 2001, 01:06

Richard,
I found this snippet of info:
Rights and Obligations of Foreign Workers

on this government sponsored website:
Information for Foreigners

I believe there are several groups who oversee the rights of foreign laborers in Taiwan, mainly domestic and construction workers, but I've never seen, nor heard of, an organisation which aims to protect and oversee the rights of the thousands of English teachers on this island.
Is there one? If not, I wonder why not.
Over the years I've heard scads of stories related to unfair treatment towards these foreign workers. I'm guessing since so many are transient, that this type of organisation has never been established.
Amazing, isn't it?
I know there's a group ETA-ROC, English Teachers Assoc, but they're concerned with the TESOL side rather than rights, although there's no official TESOL chapter here either.
When you think of it, it IS rather abyssmal like DDE says.
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Postby DDE11678 » 16 Oct 2001, 02:53

Some of the human rights abuses I see as an issue for foreigners (in no particular order):

- No means of recourse (or impossible if you try) in disputes with employers/employer violation of contracts, etc.

- No means of petitioning to the government in issues of employment or against deportation, banning from the R.O.C., etc. for LEGAL foreign residents, employees.

- Being forced to produce ARC's/passports to police S.W.A.T. team members toting machine guns in internet cafe raids.

- Foreigners not being permitted to hold more than one job when your legal employer refuses to give you enough hours to support yourself.

In addition, the policies/procedures involved in working/living in Taiwan should reward and not punish those who want to be here legally. Illegal employees seem to have a much easier time, not being beholden to a corrupt, money-hungry buxiban owner who holds your ARC in his/her hands. The procedures should also be standardized, clear, and not decided by the whim of an individual government official. I think there should also be a government office set up to help foreign employees resolve issues with employers and be an intermediary in issues with other government agencies.

The system in Taiwan is far from fair ... and it makes me think that the whole concept of "Democracy" in Taiwan is such a joke. I had an easier time with the bureaucracy and system in Communist China than here. Will the system ever be changed? No ... because make things better for us here is of no personal benefit to the government of Taiwan. When have they ever acted in the interests of someone other than themselves?
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Postby Bu Lai En » 16 Oct 2001, 04:07

<blockquote><font size="1" face="Verdana, Arial, Helvetica, Geneva">quote:</font><hr> Some of the human rights abuses I see as an issue for foreigners (in no particular order):
- No means of recourse (or impossible if you try) in disputes with employers/employer violation of contracts, etc.

- No means of petitioning to the government in issues of employment or against deportation, banning from the R.O.C., etc. for LEGAL foreign residents, employees.

- Being forced to produce ARC's/passports to police S.W.A.T. team members toting machine guns in internet cafe raids.

- Foreigners not being permitted to hold more than one job when your legal employer refuses to give you enough hours to support yourself.

<hr></blockquote>

I think the first threeoftheseare pretty much the same for most Taiwanese. It's that last one that bothers me. Just what is the rationale behind not allowing you to work two jobs? The only advantage is to the employer. It's to the disadvantage of the government because they miss out on that extra tax revenue.
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Postby DDE11678 » 16 Oct 2001, 10:16

Hey Brian,
Just one small disagreement from me ... the first three DON'T apply to Taiwanese because if they get screwed over on a contract squabble or don't happen to have their passport or I.D. card with them when an internet cafe gets raided, etc. they don't face deportation and being banned from the country for 5 years. And even though they may have little legal recourse, that doesn't mean that we shouldn't either ... In a supposed "democracy," people are supposed to have certain rights & protections ... sometimes I can't understand why the West considers Taiwan a "democracy" ... whether or not the leaders are "elected," they still act like an authoritarian government.
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Postby cespejo » 10 Jul 2002, 06:46

Dear all,
My name is Cristina.
I currently work in a Taiwanese company. I admit that as a European I am extremelly shocked by the lack of human rights knowledge in the country.
Workers find normal to work till really late every night and every weekend, they find normal not to have sick-leave.
I am very interested in getting activly involved with an organization focused on human rights (most specially labour rights and work discrimination).
If any of you can forward me the information of someone or an organization in Taipei (please) I could join I would really appreciate it.
Thank you,
Cristina
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Human Rights in Taiwan, GIO website

Postby Hartzell » 10 Jul 2002, 06:50

As moderator of this Forum, I would be happy to meet with you personally and discuss your concerns.
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