Family Registration Required for Children Born in Taiwan

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Postby amos » 09 Jun 2003, 22:52

Boomer, didn't you get an English birth certificate with your name on it? I've been going through some websites concerning registering the birth of our child in Australia in order to get citizenship papers etc, and one document that needs to be sited by the Aussie authorities is a birth certificate that has both parents' names.
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Postby Eric W. Lier » 10 Jun 2003, 12:43

Yes, I have an English translation of my sons birth certificate. It has my name as the father. The Chinese one does not. I assume that the English one has no legal recognition in Taiwan, that is why my name is on it. They were both given to us by Tai-Da Hospital in Taipei.
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Taiwan Passport

Postby ShanYang » 15 Jun 2003, 13:23

Why not get your son a Taiwan passport, now that this has become a possibility, and then you won't have to worry about all this. He can legally keep both the foreign and Taiwan passport until the age of 18, when he will have to decide whether or not to keep the Taiwanese, in which case, he will have to consider military service.
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Postby Eric W. Lier » 22 Jun 2003, 19:39

Hong Kong 1997!
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Postby Mr He » 29 Jun 2003, 15:00

So you think he'll have a choice about military service?
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Postby Eric W. Lier » 29 Jun 2003, 19:16

I don
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Postby X3M » 30 Jun 2003, 10:59

There is probably some details I have missed in this tread, but I find it strange that you can not get Taiwanese (ROC) nationality/citizenship for your foreign/Taiwanese mixed kid(s).

My sons, born 6 and 9 years ago here in Taiwan has ROC (Taiwan) Passport with my chinese-translated family name. They were called in to get their prescribed shots as babies, and now attend local school on same terms as other kids. Isn't this the norm?

They also have passport from my home country.
Am I missing something that does not make them "real" citizens of ROC? My wife does not seem to have any issues with this.....
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Postby Eric W. Lier » 30 Jun 2003, 12:01

The way I understood it at the time, in order for my son to get a passport from the R.O.C. he could not have a American father. His mother would have to claim sole guardianship and the fathers name could not be on the Chinese birth certificate. Thus I would not legally be my son
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Postby Hartzell » 30 Jun 2003, 12:49

This information is totally incorrect.
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Postby Eric W. Lier » 30 Jun 2003, 14:49

Would you be so kind as to inform me why my name is not on my son's only legally recognized birth certificate and why my son was refused the right of citizenship when he was born in Taiwan, to a Taiwanese mother?
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