How To Have a "Taiwan Guoyu" Accent to Your Taiwan Mandarin

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How To Have a "Taiwan Guoyu" Accent to Your Taiwan Mandarin

Postby Teddoman » 11 May 2012, 09:51

This thread is for coming up with different words that you frequently hear in Mandarin using a "Taiwan guoyu" accent. If we accumulate enough examples here, it would help any of us interested in having fun and imitating the Taiwan guoyu accent.

Definitions
    Taiwan Mandarin- Mandarin learned in Taiwan
    "Taiwan Guoyu" - Mandarin spoken by someone with an accent that derive from Taiyu, or Taiwanese (probably the speaker's first and primary language/dialect). Example: Former President Chen Shui Bian, who had a very thick Taiwan guoyu accent when speaking Mandarin.

I did a thread search and could not find any thread specifically on training people to imitate a Taiwan Guoyu accent.

Here are some posts I am splitting off from another thread to get this discussion going in its own thread:

tsukinodeynatsu wrote:
Teddoman wrote:Can anyone here do a good Chen Shui Bian style Taiwan guoyu accent? I have been dying to figure out how to do one of those so I can entertain friends. If anyone has some tips on what makes a good thick Taiwan guoyu accent, do share :)



I occasionally come out with it on a few words, but I try not to XD

My linguistics are shocking, but to my ears I think a Taiwan guoyu accent needs to be kind of:

f = the 'hw' sound at the beginning of 婚
m = somewhere between an 'm' and a 'b'

Umm umm umm... what else? The vowel sound in 'shi' ((pinyin) or similar) closer to an 'ee' sound. R's said as L's (cutting a fine line with D too, I think).

Drop the h's after any consonent. SH = S ZH = Z CH = C etc. J's are said somewhere inbetween J and (English) Z.

These should get you merrily on your way :bow:

And in order to write this, I had to actually go and find out what CSB sounded like when he spoke (to check which accent you meant). It took me around five minutes to find a clip that wasn't in Taiwanese, and now I can't get over how Taike he sounds in Mandarin O.o; (His Taiwanese sounds very cultured, though.)


shengou wrote:A couple more things for Taiwan Guoyu.

uo - change to ou
ian - change to en
the u sound in 女 - change to more of an i sound (this one is harder to explain)

So zuo bian de nv hai would be closer to zou ben de ni hai. Then throw in a couple hou's and voila, your Guoyu changes to Taiwan Gouyi.

Also, you need to have a choppy cadence.


shengou wrote:I thought of a couple others. chi fan would be cu huan. But I don't know what the rule is for that. I've only ever noticed the "ir" sound in chi changing. I can't remember if they do it for other "ir" sounds like "shi" or "zhi". Maybe they do. So maybe zhi dao changes to zu dao. Also, the w sound in wo is very slight. It's close to just being an o.

Xie xie changes to seh seh.


Sam Vimes wrote:Along those lines, my spouse tells me that she and her co-workers were playing a form of charades one evening, and the husband of one of the other girls was supposed to convey the name of a country through gestures. For the first syllable, he kept on pointing outside at the road, and it gradually dawned on them that he meant the syllable "Lu". But what country begins with "Lu"? :s

Why, "Lu-Ben", of course!
:roll: . . . which is the Taiwan Guoyu way of saying Japan (i.e., Ri-Ben).
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Re: How To Have a "Taiwan Guoyu" Accent to Your Taiwan Mandarin

Postby PigBloodCake » 11 May 2012, 10:31

IMHO, unless you do not give a rat's behind regarding anything that has to do with CHINA, I say don't do "Taiwan-ized 國語". It's like learning Texan English (howdy).

Lotsa folks outside the 'wan are practically learning mainland Chinese (so-called 普通話) along with simplified characters (although I personally believe traditional characters are much better since you can sorta figure out the simplified characters after having yourself immersed in traditional characters).

To each his/her own, I guess.
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Re: How To Have a "Taiwan Guoyu" Accent to Your Taiwan Mandarin

Postby Teddoman » 11 May 2012, 10:37

Thanks PBC, but this thread is NOT about mainland Mandarin vs Taiwan Mandarin.

This thread is specifically about the accent used by some local Taiwanese to speak Mandarin. It is not standard Mandarin according to Taiwanese standards. It is often spoken by people from the south where Taiyu or Taiwanese is more prevalent. In Mandarin, they call it "taiwan guoyu" which specifically refers to having the southern Taiyu influenced accent.

The standard Mandarin accent that is common in Taipei is NOT what is known as "taiwan guoyu"

To use an analogy:
Mainland standard putonghua = midwestern English
Taiwan standard Mandarin = Tennessee English
"Taiwan guoyu" Mandarin = Rural Mississippi English
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Re: How To Have a "Taiwan Guoyu" Accent to Your Taiwan Mandarin

Postby PigBloodCake » 11 May 2012, 14:01

Teddoman wrote:Thanks PBC, but this thread is NOT about mainland Mandarin vs Taiwan Mandarin.

This thread is specifically about the accent used by some local Taiwanese to speak Mandarin. It is not standard Mandarin according to Taiwanese standards. It is often spoken by people from the south where Taiyu or Taiwanese is more prevalent. In Mandarin, they call it "taiwan guoyu" which specifically refers to having the southern Taiyu influenced accent.

The standard Mandarin accent that is common in Taipei is NOT what is known as "taiwan guoyu"

To use an analogy:
Mainland standard putonghua = midwestern English
Taiwan standard Mandarin = Tennessee English
"Taiwan guoyu" Mandarin = Rural Mississippi English


Ok, lesson #1: I am John = wo(3) shi(4) John. (standard Mandarin)
(Taiwan *Guoyu*) = o(3) su(4) John.

That'll be 600NT :discodance:
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Re: How To Have a "Taiwan Guoyu" Accent to Your Taiwan Mandarin

Postby tommy525 » 11 May 2012, 14:23

If you speak taiwanese like I do, its a natural.

IF not, watch some of Chen shui bians speeches?

Or Lee teng hui's

Or listen to your local Ah pei speaking mando
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Re: How To Have a "Taiwan Guoyu" Accent to Your Taiwan Mandarin

Postby Icon » 11 May 2012, 17:46

tommy525 wrote:If you speak taiwanese like I do, its a natural.

IF not, watch some of Chen shui bians speeches?

Or Lee teng hui's

Or listen to your local Ah pei speaking mando


The man was exaggerating for the crowds. In normal usage, it was not like that.
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Re: How To Have a "Taiwan Guoyu" Accent to Your Taiwan Mandarin

Postby Teddoman » 11 May 2012, 21:00

PigBloodCake wrote:Ok, lesson #1: I am John = wo(3) shi(4) John. (standard Mandarin)
(Taiwan *Guoyu*) = o(3) su(4) John.

That'll be 600NT :discodance:

Um, can I get a discount? I think teaching English has completely warped your perception of Mandarin rates, much less rates for learning bad Mandarin :)

tommy525 wrote:If you speak taiwanese like I do, its a natural.

Well I guess that's the rub, 'cause I failed miserably when I tried to learn Taiwanese briefly.

tommy525 wrote:IF not, watch some of Chen shui bians speeches?

Or Lee teng hui's

Or listen to your local Ah pei speaking mando

I've done this many times. I can hear the difference. But hearing is different from knowing what changes to make to my Mandarin to replicate it.

What can I say, I'm not a linguist who can dissect sounds on my own. I'm a mere mortal and need someone to break it down for me.
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Re: How To Have a "Taiwan Guoyu" Accent to Your Taiwan Mandarin

Postby Chris » 11 May 2012, 21:05

Taiwan Guoyu Lesson 2:

Vocabulary

fa1 sen1: peanut
hua1 sen1: happen

Dialogue

A: O-men go-ja dei hua-zan su zongyao dei
B: Su, a!

A: Our country's development is important.
B: Yes.

:bow:
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Re: How To Have a "Taiwan Guoyu" Accent to Your Taiwan Mandarin

Postby PigBloodCake » 11 May 2012, 22:39

Teddoman wrote:
PigBloodCake wrote:Ok, lesson #1: I am John = wo(3) shi(4) John. (standard Mandarin)
(Taiwan *Guoyu*) = o(3) su(4) John.

That'll be 600NT :discodance:

Um, can I get a discount? I think teaching English has completely warped your perception of Mandarin rates, much less rates for learning bad Mandarin :)


You're absolutely right. What was I thinking? :loco:

That'll be 105NT (a few bucks above minimum wage) :cry:
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Re: How To Have a "Taiwan Guoyu" Accent to Your Taiwan Mandarin

Postby Teddoman » 12 May 2012, 02:18

PigBloodCake wrote:
Teddoman wrote:
PigBloodCake wrote:Ok, lesson #1: I am John = wo(3) shi(4) John. (standard Mandarin)
(Taiwan *Guoyu*) = o(3) su(4) John.

That'll be 600NT :discodance:

Um, can I get a discount? I think teaching English has completely warped your perception of Mandarin rates, much less rates for learning bad Mandarin :)


You're absolutely right. What was I thinking? :loco:

That'll be 105NT (a few bucks above minimum wage) :cry:

I think it was more the fact that it took you about 30 seconds to put together lesson #1, so on an hourly basis, that was like NT$200,000/hour. :no-no:

Chris- total genius stuff there. As soon as I read it, it totally felt authentic.

O hui cang hui cang ___ huan :bravo:
(ps What happens to the xi in xi3 huan1?)
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