What is the proper Vocabulary for ordering tea

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What is the proper Vocabulary for ordering tea

Postby Chrisk » 04 Jul 2012, 01:26

is black tea literally heise cha?
and green tea luse cha?

what is the vocabulary for different cup sizes?

when asked for how much ice and sugar I want, what are the proper responses?

Thanks
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What is the proper Vocabulary for ordering tea

Postby headhonchoII » 04 Jul 2012, 06:27

Black tea- Hong Cha (literally red tea)
Green tea- Lu Cha
Light Green Tea- Qing Cha

Half sugar- Ban Tang
No sugar- Wei Tang
Little Sugar- Shao Tang

No Ice- Chu Bing

Cold- Bing de
Hot- Re de

Ice Slush- Bing Sha

Milk Tea- Niu Nai

Big Cup- Da Bei
Medium Cup- Zhong Bei
Small Cup- Xiao Bei
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Re: What is the proper Vocabulary for ordering tea

Postby E04teacherlin » 04 Jul 2012, 08:53

headhonchoII wrote:Black tea- Hong Cha (literally red tea)
Green tea- Lu Cha
Light Green Tea- Qing Cha

Half sugar- Ban Tang
No sugar- Wei Tang
Little Sugar- Shao Tang

No Ice- Chu Bing

Cold- Bing de
Hot- Re de

Ice Slush- Bing Sha

Milk Tea- Niu Nai

Big Cup- Da Bei
Medium Cup- Zhong Bei
Small Cup- Xiao Bei

Wei Tang means very little sugar.
Wu Tang is no sugar.
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Re: What is the proper Vocabulary for ordering tea

Postby Chrisk » 04 Jul 2012, 11:30

thank you.
What about the equivalents of "for here or to go" when ordering food?
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Re: What is the proper Vocabulary for ordering tea

Postby Chrisk » 04 Jul 2012, 11:56

and what about normal amounts of ice / sugar
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Re: What is the proper Vocabulary for ordering tea

Postby *monkey* » 04 Jul 2012, 12:00

E04teacherlin wrote:
headhonchoII wrote:Black tea- Hong Cha (literally red tea)
Green tea- Lu Cha
Light Green Tea- Qing Cha

Half sugar- Ban Tang
No sugar- Wei Tang
Little Sugar- Shao Tang

No Ice- Chu Bing

Cold- Bing de
Hot- Re de

Ice Slush- Bing Sha

Milk Tea- Niu Nai

Big Cup- Da Bei
Medium Cup- Zhong Bei
Small Cup- Xiao Bei

Wei Tang means very little sugar.
Wu Tang is no sugar.


Milk tea is nai cha.
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Re: What is the proper Vocabulary for ordering tea

Postby headhonchoII » 04 Jul 2012, 12:23

E04teacherlin wrote:
headhonchoII wrote:Black tea- Hong Cha (literally red tea)
Green tea- Lu Cha
Light Green Tea- Qing Cha

Half sugar- Ban Tang
No sugar- Wei Tang
Little Sugar- Shao Tang

No Ice- Chu Bing

Cold- Bing de
Hot- Re de

Ice Slush- Bing Sha

Milk Tea- Niu Nai

Big Cup- Da Bei
Medium Cup- Zhong Bei
Small Cup- Xiao Bei

Wei Tang means very little sugar.
Wu Tang is no sugar.


Yes you are both correct, was a bit sleepy when I wrote it. But I did put the effort in.
I can remember the fourth of July runnin' through the backwood bare.
And I can still hear my old hound dog barkin' chasin' down a hoodoo there
Chasin' down a hoodoo there.
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Re: What is the proper Vocabulary for ordering tea

Postby headhonchoII » 04 Jul 2012, 12:26

Chrisk wrote:and what about normal amounts of ice / sugar


Well some places rate it as a scale. So 7 points out of 10 for sugar level would be 'Qi Fen'.
I've never ordered 'full sugar' so I can't recall, perhaps 'Shi Fen' as in 10 out of 10! Not sure if that's what you call normal though.
I can remember the fourth of July runnin' through the backwood bare.
And I can still hear my old hound dog barkin' chasin' down a hoodoo there
Chasin' down a hoodoo there.
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Re: What is the proper Vocabulary for ordering tea

Postby Doraemonster » 04 Jul 2012, 12:34

Also: green milk tea (recommended) - 奶綠 nǎilǜ

In most shops, 少糖 shǎo táng is 80% sugar, 半糖 bàn táng is 50% (of course), and 微糖 wéi* táng is 30%, which is still very sweet. You can also try 二分糖 èr fēn táng for even less sugar.

To put it in one example sentence:
我要一杯大杯烏龍奶茶,微塘,少冰,不用袋子。
Wǒ yào yì bēi dà bēi Wūlóng nǎichá, wéi táng, shǎo bīng, bú yòng dàizi.
Literally: "I want one cup large cup [of] Oolong milk tea, tiny [amount of] sugar, [just a] little [of] ice, no need [for a] bag."

*) The dictionary pronunciation is wēi, but it's wéi in Taiwan.

Chrisk wrote:What about the equivalents of "for here or to go" when ordering food?

"To go" is 外帶 wàidài or 帶走 dàizǒu. When ordering, you'd say: 帶走的 dàizǒude or 我要外帶(帶走) wǒ yào wàidài (dàizǒu).

"For here" is 這邊用 zhèbiān yòng.
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Re: What is the proper Vocabulary for ordering tea

Postby Doraemonster » 04 Jul 2012, 12:39

headhonchoII wrote:
Chrisk wrote:and what about normal amounts of ice / sugar

Well some places rate it as a scale. So 7 points out of 10 for sugar level would be 'Qi Fen'.
I've never ordered 'full sugar' so I can't recall, perhaps 'Shi Fen' as in 10 out of 10! Not sure if that's what you call normal though.

You can say 正常糖 zhèngcháng táng, but:
1. You don't need to say it at all for the same effect.
2. It's way too sweet like that.

For the sake of completeness, you can also say 兩倍糖 liǎng bèi táng or 三倍糖 sān bèi táng for double or triple sugar. I've actually heard people ordering double sugar, but I guess if you order triple, they'll start getting suspicious. :)
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