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Bird Watching in Taiwan

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Re: Bird Watching in Taiwan

Postby Nuit » 25 May 2012, 16:48

Got some great views of a Swinhoe's Pheasant today on the trail (Taroko). I was about 10m behind it on the trail and it hadn't got a Scooby I was there!

Stock photo as I had no camera :(
Just replace that wire-fence with broadleaf beech forest

Image
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Re: Bird Watching in Taiwan

Postby Mucha Man » 26 May 2012, 11:56

Nice looking hoe.
“Everywhere else in the world is also really old” said Prof. Liu, a renowned historian at Beijing University. “We always learn that China has 5000 years of cultural heritage, and that therefore we are very special. It appears that other places also have some of this heritage stuff. And are also old. Like, really old.”

http://hikingintaiwan.blogspot.com/
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Re: Bird Watching in Taiwan

Postby chung » 26 May 2012, 12:07

Somewhat surprised to hear of a beech forest in Taroko. What trail were you hiking?
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Re: Bird Watching in Taiwan

Postby sandman » 26 May 2012, 16:27

Downer? In Taiwan? You gotta be kidding! This morning I saw crested eagles, sparrowhawks, goshawks, Japanese white-eye, black-browed barbet, Himalayan tree pies, Forsmosan blue magpie, scimitar-billed babblers, black bulbul, white-headed bulbul, Asiatic turtle dove, mynah birds, Formosan whistling thrush, kingfisher, and several other species. And I wasn't even looking.
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Re: Bird Watching in Taiwan

Postby brodie » 09 Oct 2012, 12:28

I know this thread is a little old, but I just wanted to throw in my two cents.
First off, I just got back from a 3 day trip to Kending with the Wild Bird Society of Taipei, and they are a great organization. The entire trip cost $6200 NT, and included all travel from taipei, all food, two nights (shared room) at a nice hotel in Kending, and all guiding. 71 species including two endangered species were counted on the trip. Although the English is very limited, people are very friendly, and the few that do speak English will go out of their way to help. If you would like more information, you can email them, or PM me and I will give you some additional contact info.
Also, just wanted to throw out there that if anyone is interested in doing some bird-watching in the Taipei area, I go rather regularly, and am always keen to have company. PM me if you'd like. Taiwan has the second highest concentration of bird species per km of any country in the world, its a shame to miss out on it.
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Re: Bird Watching in Taiwan

Postby Pingdong » 14 Oct 2012, 13:31

At the risk of intruding, I saw a pair of really pretty birds the other day. Lie a pigeon in shape, maybe a touch smaller, but all brilliant green. they were eating the berries at about 600m elevation in the south. You birders know the one? really fantastic looking birds, but pretty shy.
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Re: Bird Watching in Taiwan

Postby Nuit » 14 Oct 2012, 14:27

brodie wrote: 71 species including two endangered species were counted on the trip.


what were the 2 endangered that you saw?
It's raining again here. I'm rising up like a beautiful bubble to the surface.

A wicked wind whips up the hill, a handful of hopeful words.
I was what you would call seriously strung out.
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Re: Bird Watching in Taiwan

Postby Mucha Man » 14 Oct 2012, 14:30

Taiwan Green Pigeon. Aka, Taiwan Whistling Green Pigeon:

http://www.birdingintaiwan.com/whistlin ... pigeon.htm

Or possibly Emerald Dove.
“Everywhere else in the world is also really old” said Prof. Liu, a renowned historian at Beijing University. “We always learn that China has 5000 years of cultural heritage, and that therefore we are very special. It appears that other places also have some of this heritage stuff. And are also old. Like, really old.”

http://hikingintaiwan.blogspot.com/
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Re: Bird Watching in Taiwan

Postby Nuit » 14 Oct 2012, 14:47

I wish that site had mp3s of the bird song.
I hear so much more than I see here.
It's raining again here. I'm rising up like a beautiful bubble to the surface.

A wicked wind whips up the hill, a handful of hopeful words.
I was what you would call seriously strung out.
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Nuit
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Re: Bird Watching in Taiwan

Postby brodie » 15 Oct 2012, 12:21

Re Nult, the Black-Faced Spoonbill and the Pheasant-Tailed Jacana. The Jacan is not considered endangered elsewhere, but is now a rare bird here because of habitat loss, and its numbers are estimated at fewer than 100. The next ones on my very hopeful list; the Oriental White Stork, Mikado and Swinhoe's Pheasants, Spoon-billed Sandpiper, Fairy Pitta, and Indian Black Eagle. Might be a while...
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