Bringing a Mainland Chinese Wife to Taiwan

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Bringing a Mainland Chinese Wife to Taiwan

Postby lilongyue » 29 Jun 2007, 17:40

For those of you interested, I emailed the Taiwanese "consulate" in Los Angeles about bringing my Mainland Chinese wife to Taiwan. I'm a student, studying Chinese language, and asked if it would be possible to bring her with me were I to relocate to Taiwan and finish my studies. Here's the reply:

As a foreign student, your Mainland Chinese wife can not accompany you to stay in Taiwan. But Mainland Chinese living out of Mainland China and holding permanent resident certificate abroad (such as U.S. green card etc.) may apply for travel permit to Taiwan. The maximum of each stay is 10 days. No extension will be granted.



When applying for travel permit, Mainland Chinese mentioned above must submit the following documents with one current, full face photograph of themselves to the authority,

1. Application form for travel permit(It is available in TECO or can be download at the web site:// www.immigration.gov.tw).

2. Mainland Chinese passport. The remaining validity of passport shall be
no less than six months.

3. Permanent Resident Certificate.

4. Processing of application takes half of a business day in TECO; 4 days in Taiwan.(The travel permit will be approved and issued by the Bureau of immigration in Taiwan)

5. Visa fee is free of charge in TECO; $400 NT dollars charged by the Bureau of immigration in Taiwan.
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Postby Huang Guang Chen » 29 Jun 2007, 17:44

Oh dear.

There are other threads about this somewhere. Hopefully Lord Lucan can drop some of his experience here, although he;s been a tad erratic of late.

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Postby Lord Lucan » 29 Jun 2007, 20:25

Huang Guang Chen wrote:Oh dear.

There are other threads about this somewhere. Hopefully Lord Lucan can drop some of his experience here, although he;s been a tad erratic of late.

HG


Erratic?

Letting her come in at all is a big improvement on my situation a few years ago.

Lots posted on the forum about this. No need to repeat it here, really.
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Postby redwagon » 29 Jun 2007, 22:45

Lord Lucan wrote:
Huang Guang Chen wrote:Hopefully Lord Lucan can drop some of his experience here, although he;s been a tad erratic of late.


Erratic?
It's a nice way of saying 'continuously shitfaced'. :wink: I wish people were that subtle when describing my, er, colorful character...
Signature censored.
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Re: Bringing a Mainland Chinese Wife to Taiwan

Postby Tigerman » 02 Jul 2007, 11:52

lilongyue wrote:For those of you interested, I emailed the Taiwanese "consulate" in Los Angeles about bringing my Mainland Chinese wife to Taiwan. I'm a student, studying Chinese language, and asked if it would be possible to bring her with me were I to relocate to Taiwan and finish my studies. Here's the reply:

As a foreign student, your Mainland Chinese wife can not accompany you to stay in Taiwan. But Mainland Chinese living out of Mainland China and holding permanent resident certificate abroad (such as U.S. green card etc.) may apply for travel permit to Taiwan. The maximum of each stay is 10 days. No extension will be granted.


If it were me, I'd send a letter to the Taiwan Rep Office in Los Angeles and thank them for their reply, and then inform them that due to Taiwan's ridiculously restrictive policy, you will instead be studying in Mainland China and spending all of your cash there rather than in Taiwan. Thanks, but no thanks.

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Postby Lord Lucan » 02 Jul 2007, 22:05

They will only let her in if you spend three years fighting them. Then, just when you've irrevocably finalised your plans to leave they will let her in.
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Re: Bringing a Mainland Chinese Wife to Taiwan

Postby tommy525 » 29 Oct 2007, 01:06

lilongyue wrote:For those of you interested, I emailed the Taiwanese "consulate" in Los Angeles about bringing my Mainland Chinese wife to Taiwan. I'm a student, studying Chinese language, and asked if it would be possible to bring her with me were I to relocate to Taiwan and finish my studies. Here's the reply:

As a foreign student, your Mainland Chinese wife can not accompany you to stay in Taiwan. But Mainland Chinese living out of Mainland China and holding permanent resident certificate abroad (such as U.S. green card etc.) may apply for travel permit to Taiwan. The maximum of each stay is 10 days. No extension will be granted.



When applying for travel permit, Mainland Chinese mentioned above must submit the following documents with one current, full face photograph of themselves to the authority,

1. Application form for travel permit(It is available in TECO or can be download at the web site:// www.immigration.gov.tw).

2. Mainland Chinese passport. The remaining validity of passport shall be
no less than six months.

3. Permanent Resident Certificate.

4. Processing of application takes half of a business day in TECO; 4 days in Taiwan.(The travel permit will be approved and issued by the Bureau of immigration in Taiwan)

5. Visa fee is free of charge in TECO; $400 NT dollars charged by the Bureau of immigration in Taiwan.



If she has an American passport or a passport from a Western European country she can be treated as any other citizen of those countries and same rights apply. In other words, dont use her mainland passport to enter Taiwan.

Since students are rarely allowed to work freely (there are restrictions I believe) she may be subject to whatever regulations pertain to being a spouse of a student.

The point is make sure she gets a different passport then one from China and then she is subject to be treated as any other citizen of that nation.
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Re: Bringing a Mainland Chinese Wife to Taiwan

Postby Lord Lucan » 30 Oct 2007, 13:27

tommy525 wrote:
lilongyue wrote:For those of you interested, I emailed the Taiwanese "consulate" in Los Angeles about bringing my Mainland Chinese wife to Taiwan. I'm a student, studying Chinese language, and asked if it would be possible to bring her with me were I to relocate to Taiwan and finish my studies. Here's the reply:

As a foreign student, your Mainland Chinese wife can not accompany you to stay in Taiwan. But Mainland Chinese living out of Mainland China and holding permanent resident certificate abroad (such as U.S. green card etc.) may apply for travel permit to Taiwan. The maximum of each stay is 10 days. No extension will be granted.



When applying for travel permit, Mainland Chinese mentioned above must submit the following documents with one current, full face photograph of themselves to the authority,

1. Application form for travel permit(It is available in TECO or can be download at the web site:// www.immigration.gov.tw).

2. Mainland Chinese passport. The remaining validity of passport shall be
no less than six months.

3. Permanent Resident Certificate.

4. Processing of application takes half of a business day in TECO; 4 days in Taiwan.(The travel permit will be approved and issued by the Bureau of immigration in Taiwan)

5. Visa fee is free of charge in TECO; $400 NT dollars charged by the Bureau of immigration in Taiwan.



If she has an American passport or a passport from a Western European country she can be treated as any other citizen of those countries and same rights apply. In other words, dont use her mainland passport to enter Taiwan.

Since students are rarely allowed to work freely (there are restrictions I believe) she may be subject to whatever regulations pertain to being a spouse of a student.

The point is make sure she gets a different passport then one from China and then she is subject to be treated as any other citizen of that nation.


HAHAHAHAHA!!!

Ever actually tried it?
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Postby tommy525 » 30 Oct 2007, 14:22

REally? is it an issue if a person from China uses his/her US passport that they will be treated differently? Why? Possible spy?
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Postby Satellite TV » 30 Oct 2007, 17:14

tommy525 wrote:REally? is it an issue if a person from China uses his/her US passport that they will be treated differently? Why? Possible spy?


The rules for Mainland Chinese citizens is different for other foreigners. Many men here have PRC brides that cannot get visa's to come to Taiwan as there is an anuual limit.

Spying has nothing to do with it.
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