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If born in Taiwan and both parents are US citizens

Who can and cannot be a dual national, as well as the joys and frustrations accompanying that status. Includes ROC Passport and Military Conscription issues
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If born in Taiwan and both parents are US citizens

Postby PeregrineFalcon » 13 Sep 2014, 09:42

If someone were born in Taiwan but both parents are US citizens, would such a person qualify for Taiwanese citizenship already due to being born in Taiwan, or, at least, have an easier path to Taiwanese citizenship than someone who wasn't born here?
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Re: If born in Taiwan and both parents are US citizens

Postby hsinhai78 » 13 Sep 2014, 15:26

PeregrineFalcon wrote:If someone were born in Taiwan but both parents are US citizens, would such a person qualify for Taiwanese citizenship already due to being born in Taiwan, or, at least, have an easier path to Taiwanese citizenship than someone who wasn't born here?


1) There is no birthright citizenship in Taiwan

2) ROC Nationality follows the doctrine of "ius sanguinis", meaning that one parent needs to have ROC nationality.

3) There is no easier path to ROC nationality due to being born on Taiwan.
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Re: If born in Taiwan and both parents are US citizens

Postby PeregrineFalcon » 13 Sep 2014, 16:58

hsinhai78 wrote:
PeregrineFalcon wrote:If someone were born in Taiwan but both parents are US citizens, would such a person qualify for Taiwanese citizenship already due to being born in Taiwan, or, at least, have an easier path to Taiwanese citizenship than someone who wasn't born here?



2) ROC Nationality follows the doctrine of "ius sanguinis", meaning that one parent needs to have ROC nationality.


Thank you!

If the father is American and the mother is Taiwanese, and the child is born in Taiwan, does the newborn child get ROC citizenship, or remains a non-citizen until the parents file some papers?


(assuming the parents want the child to be Taiwanese and not American )
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If born in Taiwan and both parents are US citizens

Postby hsinhai78 » 13 Sep 2014, 17:32

PeregrineFalcon wrote:
hsinhai78 wrote:
PeregrineFalcon wrote:If someone were born in Taiwan but both parents are US citizens, would such a person qualify for Taiwanese citizenship already due to being born in Taiwan, or, at least, have an easier path to Taiwanese citizenship than someone who wasn't born here?



2) ROC Nationality follows the doctrine of "ius sanguinis", meaning that one parent needs to have ROC nationality.


Thank you!

If the father is American and the mother is Taiwanese, and the child is born in Taiwan, does the newborn child get ROC citizenship, or remains a non-citizen until the parents file some papers?


(assuming the parents want the child to be Taiwanese and not American )


The ROC Nationality Act makes no distinction between mother and father, it is irrelevant who passes on nationality. Any filing of papers would be of declaratory nature and does not alter the status of your child from non-national to national.

If the two of you are married, your child will be a US citizen regardless of whether you like or not.

There is no real-life disadvantage for your child to have dual nationality. Not so long ago mixed children did not have the possibility to maintain both their parents' nationality due to discriminatory laws and some people who post here on Forumosa were affected by these regulations.

When your child is 20 he may give up ROC nationality, when he is 21 he may give up US citizenship. Or keep both. Choice is a great thing.
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