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Dual Citizenship

Who can and cannot be a dual national, as well as the joys and frustrations accompanying that status. Includes ROC Passport and Military Conscription issues
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Re: Dual Citizenship

Postby IceEagle » 18 Feb 2010, 10:22

Satellite TV wrote:
IceEagle wrote:
Satellite TV wrote: Secondly the OP has citizenship of the country where he was born so is not stateless.
... but being born in Australia perhaps means he is an Australian Citizen, so not stateless. Perhaps his father is Australian.

Right, so this is not applicable to the OP. But your explanation - if applied universially - could cause statelessness to other overseas born ROC citizens who have no other citizenship.


Not the case in this situation is it? The OP has Australian Citizenship. NO need to mention things that do not apply in this case

In your posts you already admitted your are not aware of many of the rules. Well intentioned posts but they are not in fact relevant to the OP's situation.


I mentioned this because I am trying to get a better understanding of what the rules are. Not that many people have done what the OP is trying to do, even fewer have helped others do it more than once, and the one official page that I knew of that described this process (the TECO Boston page about ROC passports) turned out to be completely false.

Satellite TV wrote:I take it you have helped people go through the processes of obtaining ROC Passports and Hukou as I have?

And yes I have been a stateless ROC National so I fully understand about this ok. I have had the ROC Passport without an ID Card, I have later on obtained my Hukou then ID Card ok by completing the one year of residency here to qualify for my Hukou and ID card..


I am aware of this. You don't need do anything to establish your credibility to me.

Satellite TV wrote:2. OP may or may not be eligible for an ROC Passport as an overseas Chinese if the op meets certain eligibility rules. SO no you do not get an ROC passport as a non citizen just by showing his mother is an ROC National.


What are the eligibility rules that OP would required to meet? (Normally, I would not ask this sort of question, but considering the level of misinformation out there about this topic it seems wise to ask an expert.) So far, I've only been able to infer two of them from your posts on this thread: having a ROC National as a parent and being a minor.
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Re: Dual Citizenship

Postby Satellite TV » 19 Feb 2010, 16:35

IceEagle wrote:
Satellite TV wrote:No idea as you dont say how old you are. If over 20 perhaps too late.


Why? If he's over 20 he can still get a ROC passport, and then he just needs to establish household registration somehow.


IceEagle wrote:What are the eligibility rules that OP would required to meet? (Normally, I would not ask this sort of question, but considering the level of misinformation out there about this topic it seems wise to ask an expert.) So far, I've only been able to infer two of them from your posts on this thread: having a ROC National as a parent and being a minor.


Well you see you were posting as if you actually knew the rules. You are telling the OP to apply for an ROC Passport then apply for a Hukou.
So you can see where the misinformation comes from. Citizennship by lineage does have time limits. My son, should he wish to apply for ROC Nationality must do so by 20 years of age as he is legally a dependent until then, and he lives here on his ARC as a dependent.

After that time he is not elgible to apply for ROC Nationality any more by using his mother. He could still apply under having met the residential requirement as an PARC holder later on. So at 20 my son will simply move from a Dependent ARC to a PARC. This can happen for dependent children where one parent is an ROC National and where the child has met residential requirement to apply for an ARC. This rule does not apply to dependent children where both parents hold ARC or PARC and are not ROC Nationals. Those children lose their ARC status as they by law are no longer considered dependents.

The OP can approach the NIA and also the MOI as they handle these types of scenarios.
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Re: Dual Citizenship

Postby Satellite TV » 19 Feb 2010, 16:42

IceEagle wrote: Not that many people have done what the OP is trying to do, .


I know quite a few. Many expats here have children who can qualify for ROC Nationilty through having an ROC mother. Of course for a daughter who doesnt need to do military service it's an easier decision.

I know many expats whose children were born before 2000 to a mother who is an ROC Citizen. Many of them no longer live in Taiwan but there are many who do.
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Re: Dual Citizenship

Postby IceEagle » 20 Feb 2010, 03:28

Satellite TV wrote:
IceEagle wrote:
Satellite TV wrote:No idea as you dont say how old you are. If over 20 perhaps too late.


Why? If he's over 20 he can still get a ROC passport, and then he just needs to establish household registration somehow.


IceEagle wrote:What are the eligibility rules that OP would required to meet? (Normally, I would not ask this sort of question, but considering the level of misinformation out there about this topic it seems wise to ask an expert.) So far, I've only been able to infer two of them from your posts on this thread: having a ROC National as a parent and being a minor.


Well you see you were posting as if you actually knew the rules. You are telling the OP to apply for an ROC Passport then apply for a Hukou.
So you can see where the misinformation comes from.


Yes, from official sources such as http://www.immigration.gov.tw/immig_eng ... ent006.asp and http://www.newluchu.gov.tw/eng/faq/faq.html or http://www.boca.gov.tw/ct.asp?xItem=148 ... e=528&mp=2

And from my own reading of laws such as http://www.immigration.gov.tw/aspcode/L ... ?NodeID=87 and http://www.boca.gov.tw/np.asp?ctNode=86&mp=2 , etc.

Of course, this is not the first time that such sources would be wrong (the former page at http://www.tecoboston.org/passport_eng.html being an example).

Satellite TV wrote:Citizennship by lineage does have time limits. My son, should he wish to apply for ROC Nationality must do so by 20 years of age as he is legally a dependent until then, and he lives here on his ARC as a dependent.

After that time he is not elgible to apply for ROC Nationality any more by using his mother. He could still apply under having met the residential requirement as an PARC holder later on. So at 20 my son will simply move from a Dependent ARC to a PARC. This can happen for dependent children where one parent is an ROC National and where the child has met residential requirement to apply for an ARC. This rule does not apply to dependent children where both parents hold ARC or PARC and are not ROC Nationals. Those children lose their ARC status as they by law are no longer considered dependents.

The OP can approach the NIA and also the MOI as they handle these types of scenarios.


I understand.

Satellite TV wrote:
IceEagle wrote: Not that many people have done what the OP is trying to do, .


I know quite a few. Many expats here have children who can qualify for ROC Nationilty through having an ROC mother. Of course for a daughter who doesnt need to do military service it's an easier decision.

I know many expats whose children were born before 2000 to a mother who is an ROC Citizen. Many of them no longer live in Taiwan but there are many who do.


That seems reasonable. But how many have children that were born before 1991?
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Re: Dual Citizenship

Postby Satellite TV » 20 Feb 2010, 10:34

IceEagle wrote:
Satellite TV wrote:Citizennship by lineage does have time limits. My son, should he wish to apply for ROC Nationality must do so by 20 years of age as he is legally a dependent until then, and he lives here on his ARC as a dependent.


I understand.

Satellite TV wrote:
IceEagle wrote: Not that many people have done what the OP is trying to do, .


I know quite a few. Many expats here have children who can qualify for ROC Nationilty through having an ROC mother. Of course for a daughter who doesnt need to do military service it's an easier decision.

I know many expats whose children were born before 2000 to a mother who is an ROC Citizen. Many of them no longer live in Taiwan but there are many who do.


That seems reasonable. But how many have children that were born before 1991?


Why 1991? The rules apply after that date and before that date.

No idea how many children were born to ROC mothers and foreign fathers. Thousands no doubt.
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Re: Dual Citizenship

Postby IceEagle » 20 Feb 2010, 11:30

Satellite TV wrote:Why 1991? The rules apply after that date and before that date.


In the year 2010, anyone born after 1991 would be under twenty years of age. Anyone born before then would be twenty or older.
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Re: Dual Citizenship

Postby Satellite TV » 20 Feb 2010, 11:36

IceEagle wrote:
Satellite TV wrote: Why 1991? The rules apply after that date and before that date.


In the year 2010, anyone born after 1991 would be under twenty years of age. Anyone born before then would be twenty or older.


No those born in 1991 are only 19 in 2010. They wont turn 20 until 2011.


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Re: Dual Citizenship

Postby IceEagle » 22 Feb 2010, 22:16

Satellite TV wrote:
IceEagle wrote:In the year 2010, anyone born after 1991 would be under twenty years of age. Anyone born before then would be twenty or older.


No those born in 1991 are only 19 in 2010. They wont turn 20 until 2011.


Agreed. I see 19 as being "under twenty years of age" so I don't see any contradiction here...
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Re: Dual Citizenship

Postby smithsgj » 27 Feb 2010, 19:58

Crikey. Lock the thread?
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Re: Dual Citizenship

Postby ironfist » 02 Jan 2013, 01:32

question about USA/ROC dual C.

If I open an account with my other citizenship (not US) in USA. And later I get divorced or lawsuit or bankrupted or anything like that. Can they get to that account? I think they can't because it's another person' account pretty much. But if they can link you then maybe they can? anyone actually got experience in this and know the answer? What will they ask if you wanna open a bank account in USA with a foreign passport or ID? USA address? ID I guess?, will they check the visa too? because I won't enter USA with that passport...I will enter US with USA passport.thanks guys.
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