How do I become a Taiwanese citizen? Am I a dual national?

Who can and cannot be a dual national, as well as the joys and frustrations accompanying that status. Includes ROC Passport and Military Conscription issues
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Re: How do I become a Taiwanese citizen? Am I a dual nationa

Postby chichow » 29 Sep 2010, 05:52

Satellite TV wrote:
chichow wrote:What are my chances for Taiwan ROC Overseas Passport? - I have called TECO and they are sending me forms. Per my conversation with them, it looks like its pretty easy for me to get and then I can stay in Taiwan for 3 months at a time. What are my changes to get an ID number with my Taiwan ROC Overseas Passport? Would like that in order to get TaibaoZhen. Thoughts? next steps? I've started by reading Forumosa and calling TECO. I'm trying to get everything lined up before a trip back to Taipei this winter. Thanks much.


Overseas Passports do not have an ID number in them, without that no Taibaozheng from China laddy., Pay up as an American ( around US$400 nowadays I believe ) and geta 2 entry visa. Once you have resided here for a year as an overseas Chinese you can then apply for an ID card. I am not totally up on the rules as I did this a decade ago.

I went to Manila on my passport overseas Chinese passport, but when I tried to return to Taiwan the EVA Airlines staff refused to let me check in because when they look at my brand new passport with one exit stamp from Taiwan, and one entry stamp to Manila, they said I didn't have a visa to for Taiwan, even though the name on the ticket was my Chinese name, and the fact the passport is written in English and Chinese. They sure were red faced when I asked them to look at the front cover of the passport. :roflmao: :roflmao: :roflmao:


Check this out. With some help with the translating (gotta translate birth certificate, et. al), from the date of this post...

IVE HAD MY TAIWAN ROC PASSPORT FOR ABOUT A WEEK OR SO!!!!

So, where does the ID number show on the Taiwan ROC passport if you have one?

One benefit of the Taiwan ROC passport is that before as a US citizen I could only stay for 30 days at a time. With the Taiwan ROC passport I can stay for 90 days at a time (not that getting off work for that long is going to be possible)

Thanks for the reply SAT
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Re: How do I become a Taiwanese citizen? Am I a dual nationa

Postby allya » 10 Dec 2010, 11:14

Satellite TV, like you mentioned below and based on what I read of the 2000 revision of the nationality law, any person born to a Taiwan national and who is still a minor could claim citizenship. They made this retroactive for 20 years, so at the time of the promulgation of the act in 2000, minors (born after Feb. 9, 1980) were eligible to claim citizenship through either his/her father or mother. Since your son was born in 1991, he would have been only 9 years old in 2000 and therefore still a minor, and thus could claim citizenship through his mother, who I believe you said is a Taiwan citizen. So I'm puzzled as to why you said he couldn't?


Satellite TV wrote:
Curious Biker wrote:Satellite TV, I’m surprise that your son Tommy born and raised in TW with TW mom, and yet has no household registration?!?!?! Dude, your son is as much a Taiwanese as he is an Aussie (You’re Aussie right?). Why? This so weird! Was it because you’re white or because you’re not TW Citizen? But you do have household registration. Was it because Tommy's mom (your wife) is no longer a TW citizen? That could be it the problem. I thought native born Taiwanese never loses their Citizenships no matter what... was I wrong on this? Much like native born U.S. Citizens.

I am of Taiwanese decent for couple of generations but I don’t think it mean quart to the current ROC government. If I’m planning to move back to Taiwan (which I will), my boy and I will have to ride on my wife’s status as TW citizen. Maybe I’ll have suffer the same fate as you…. So much for our very green blood.

Hang in there bro…. you and your son definitely make the clan as Taiwanese in my book! :bravo:


I am not an Aussie but I was born there. Before 1986 anybody born in Australia was an Australian Citizen. But since that time only children born in Australia who has at least one parent who is a permanent resident gets citizenship if born in Oz. My son got his Aussie citzenship because at the time of his birth I was an Australian citizen. So he got that by descent.

It's quite simple really. ROC Nationality before 2000 had to be based on the FATHER being an ROC Citizen. The law was changed in 2000 so that citizenship can now come from either parent. My son was born in 1991. But anyways when he turns 20 he can automatically get the permanent resident visa as he has one parent who sponsors his ARC being and ROC Citizen. Me :discodance:

Last time I bled my blood was red, just like all humans have, and most other animals as well. Some animals do have blue blood though.
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Re: How do I become a Taiwanese citizen? Am I a dual nationa

Postby xheffalump » 16 Dec 2010, 10:44

As far as I know, allya is right. Those born to a Taiwanese national have up until their 20th birthday to claim citizenship.

I was born in Taipei in 1991 to a Taiwanese mother and German/English father. I was immediately awarded British citizenship but we didn't return to the UK until 1993. In the last year or I've decided to eventually leave the UK and take up residency in Taiwan, but had a slight panic when I found out about the 20th birthday cut-off. Thankfully, my Ah Ma did some hunting around for me and apparently because I was born there, I'm entitled to citizenship at any point in my life.

I'm also intrigued as to why you struggled to claim citizenship for your son, Satellite TV!
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Re: How do I become a Taiwanese citizen? Am I a dual nationa

Postby Satellite TV » 16 Dec 2010, 14:36

xheffalump wrote:As far as I know, allya is right. Those born to a Taiwanese national have up until their 20th birthday to claim citizenship.

I was born in Taipei in 1991 to a Taiwanese mother and German/English father. I was immediately awarded British citizenship but we didn't return to the UK until 1993. In the last year or I've decided to eventually leave the UK and take up residency in Taiwan, but had a slight panic when I found out about the 20th birthday cut-off. Thankfully, my Ah Ma did some hunting around for me and apparently because I was born there, I'm entitled to citizenship at any point in my life.

I'm also intrigued as to why you struggled to claim citizenship for your son, Satellite TV!


You want to check out your claim of being entitled to citizenship and any point in your life. My son was born here and the MOI says he has to get it before he turns 20. Same rule would apply to you as well.

I never struggled to claim citizenship for my son, he has Australian Citizenship, he doesnt have ROC citizenship.
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Re: How do I become a Taiwanese citizen? Am I a dual nationa

Postby Satellite TV Jr » 16 Dec 2010, 16:07

Satellite TV wrote:
Curious Biker wrote:I agree. It is more than dumb that you were born and raised in TW (with TW mom!) and not having Dual Citizenship. That is just wrong!


Really? My son managed here quite fine in the same situation. He does not hold ROC Nationality either.


Tzen Fu Bu Ai Wo.

Still thinking about Taiwanese citizenship (mainly due to conscription), I'll see how well things go for the Australian Defence Force (ADF).

Edit: Yeah I managed pretty well having an ARC, pretty much made no difference except I'm not scrabbling to dodge conscription unlike most of my friends.
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Re: How do I become a Taiwanese citizen? Am I a dual nationa

Postby Satellite TV » 16 Dec 2010, 18:31

Satellite TV Jr wrote:
Satellite TV wrote:
Curious Biker wrote:I agree. It is more than dumb that you were born and raised in TW (with TW mom!) and not having Dual Citizenship. That is just wrong!


Really? My son managed here quite fine in the same situation. He does not hold ROC Nationality either.


Tzen Fu Bu Ai Wo.

Still thinking about Taiwanese citizenship (mainly due to conscription), I'll see how well things go for the Australian Defence Force (ADF).

Edit: Yeah I managed pretty well having an ARC, pretty much made no difference except I'm not scrabbling to dodge conscription unlike most of my friends.



Poagao didnt get a notice until 1 year after he became a citizen. They don't draft you right away just because you have citizenship here.
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Re: How do I become a Taiwanese citizen? Am I a dual nationa

Postby xheffalump » 08 Jan 2011, 15:47

Satellite TV wrote:You want to check out your claim of being entitled to citizenship and any point in your life. My son was born here and the MOI says he has to get it before he turns 20. Same rule would apply to you as well.

I never struggled to claim citizenship for my son, he has Australian Citizenship, he doesnt have ROC citizenship.


Strange. The Taiwanese Embassy told me different, as did the Household Registry Office in my Ama's district.
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Re: How do I become a Taiwanese citizen? Am I a dual national?

Postby MacHead » 11 Mar 2011, 16:51

Hi Guys, I am a Taiwanese National, who was born and is still living abroad. I have an expired ROC passport with National Identity Number printed on it but I don't have an actual card (maybe not issued? I know children has the number but waits around 15 or so to get issued one). I went back to Taiwan for a while when I was very young with my mom (ROC citizen with ID) and that is how I got this in the first place. Do you think TECO would reprint this identity card # on my new passport upon renewal without me showing the national ID? I am assuming that a national ID card number should not have an expiration, correct? Mine starts with A********, old hukou in Taipei if I am not mistaken.

I intend to visit my aunt in Kaoshiung (Gaoxiong) together with my mom and use her house deed to get my hukou and hopefully get my ID. Also, if I get a new passport with the shenfenzhen number printed on it, would I still need the actual ID to be able to enter a country with a reciprocity agreement? I am guessing it is not required, but I want to throw this out to you guys.

Hopefully, I would not have a problem renewing my passport with the ID# printed on it which expired back in 1992. :s
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Re: How do I become a Taiwanese citizen? Am I a dual national?

Postby Pioneer Kuro » 17 Mar 2011, 07:22

In that case, if you are not over 35, you would probably be drafted into the military.Check it out.
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Re: How do I become a Taiwanese citizen? Am I a dual national?

Postby mileena » 12 Sep 2011, 09:31

Satellite TV wrote:
mileena wrote:My mom became a U.S. citizen around 1975 or 1976 and was forced to renounce her Taiwanese citizenship. Since my mother is Taiwanese, am I a Taiwanese citizen as well? I am trying very hard to learn both Mandarin and Taiwanese.I want to visit Taiwan and stay for more than 30 days. I don't want to have to apply for a visa.Thanks!


Firstly your mother would not have been forced to give up ROC Nationality.... crock of shite imho she probably just never renewed her ROC passport which is something else altogether. Taiwanese are allowed dual nationality.

At 40 years of age you would not qualitfy for ROC Nationality as you need to apply before you turn 20. Nothing to do with discrimination.


I know this thread is very old, but I wanted to make two points after re-reading it today.

First, Taiwan apparently does not allow dual nationality, at least according to these websites:

http://www.immihelp.com/citizenship/dual-citizenship-recognize-countries.html
http://www.multiplecitizenship.com/wscl/ws_TAIWAN.html

The urls above could be wrong, or maybe the law has changed retroactively since then?

Second, even if I applied for Taiwanese citizenship before age 20, I ostensibly would not have gotten it, as citizenship was patrilineal when I was born in 1969, as Screaming Jesus pointed out in post #2 on page 1 of this thread. Taiwanese citizenship based on your mother being Taiwanese only began February 9, 2000 and was made retroactive to 20 years (so only those born after February 9, 1980 would have been allowed to apply for citizenship based on their mothers' Taiwanese citizenship).
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