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Military Conscription Rules for Dual Nationality Chinese

Who can and cannot be a dual national, as well as the joys and frustrations accompanying that status. Includes ROC Passport and Military Conscription issues
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Re: Military Conscription Rules for Dual Nationality Chinese

Postby IceEagle » 29 Sep 2014, 23:39

pook110 wrote:Hi,

I was born pre 1984, and a US citizen but born in Taiwan. Should I enter with my Taiwan passport? and then apply the 4 month rule? thanks. Please help


Probably. Make sure you get the Overseas Chinese visa/endorsement in your Taiwan passport first, before entering Taiwan, but as long as you do that then this should work.

soar55 wrote:Does anyone know if we can change our name on foreign passports (ie. Canadian passport) and enter Taiwan, will this avoids Taiwan to know that I am an dual Taiwanese Citizen, but that I am entering as a Canadian instead? This is another loophole that I've heard of. I just wonder if anyone know more factual information about this. Whether or not foreign passports are connected with Taiwanese passport's database, even if we changed our legal name on the foreign passport.


I assume that this means getting a whole new Canadian passport, which in turn requires getting a new passport issue number? The only other information they could use to link it up then would be your birth date and birth place, but probably too many people would match those criteria for it to be useful.

If the new passport has your old name listed as an alias, or contains the old passport's issue number, then this won't work as the Taiwan authorities could still look you up. If you have an old visa that you want to mvoe from the old passport to the new one, typically the visa in your new passport will say that it's an extension of so and so visa with visa number XXXXXXX in passport number YYYYYY - the immigration/border officer in Taiwan will probably see it and can still look you up on the old passport number that way then.

Likewise, if you are in a foreign country when getting the new passport, so that your entry and exit stamps are on two different passports, typically the stamp will have something written beside it to say that the other stamp is on passport number YYYYYY.

If your new passport has no mention of your old passport number or your old name at all, anywhere, then your odds are much better. I still wouldn't guarantee it though. Possibly you might still be caught if they take fingerprints or something...

soar55 wrote:the 183 days rule applies on me, I sometimes have to do projects in Taiwan and sometimes I have to stay in Taiwan longer than 183 days within a year if good project comes, I don't want to have to forced to not take on really great projects just because I've stayed in Taiwan more than 183 days in that year...

thank you very much


I guess working on such projects outside of Taiwan (in Singapore, HK, or even on a cruise ship just outside of Taiwan's waters) is not an option here?

The only surefire option I can think of is, while in Canada, get the Overseas Chinese endorsement and then renounce your ROC nationality at TECO. As long as you have that endorsement, you aren't required to complete military service before renouncing.
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Re: Military Conscription Rules for Dual Nationality Chinese

Postby graqfreak » 11 Nov 2014, 19:48

Hello all,

I've recent obtained British Naturalisation. Once I securce a British passport I was hoping to go back and visit my family in Taiwan for a couple of weeks. Will I be able to go through immigration in/out using the British passport w/o any trouble?

I was born in Taipei in 1986. Been in the UK studying till 2008 and that was the last time I went back to Taiwan as a student. Haven't done military service. Currently holding a Taiwanese passport but it expired last year Sept 2013. I haven't tried to renew it.

I understand I am not exempted from the military service as I am still an ROC citizen, will I be able to avoid it by entering w/ visitor visa using a UK passport?

Help is much appreciated.
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Re: Military Conscription Rules for Dual Nationality Chinese

Postby BAH » 19 Nov 2014, 09:46

graqfreak wrote:Hello all,

I've recent obtained British Naturalisation. Once I securce a British passport I was hoping to go back and visit my family in Taiwan for a couple of weeks. Will I be able to go through immigration in/out using the British passport w/o any trouble?

I was born in Taipei in 1986. Been in the UK studying till 2008 and that was the last time I went back to Taiwan as a student. Haven't done military service. Currently holding a Taiwanese passport but it expired last year Sept 2013. I haven't tried to renew it.

I understand I am not exempted from the military service as I am still an ROC citizen, will I be able to avoid it by entering w/ visitor visa using a UK passport?

Help is much appreciated.


You won't have a problem as long as you don't stay too long.
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Re: Military Conscription Rules for Dual Nationality Chinese

Postby graqfreak » 21 May 2015, 23:53

BAH wrote:
graqfreak wrote:Hello all,

I've recent obtained British Naturalisation. Once I securce a British passport I was hoping to go back and visit my family in Taiwan for a couple of weeks. Will I be able to go through immigration in/out using the British passport w/o any trouble?

I was born in Taipei in 1986. Been in the UK studying till 2008 and that was the last time I went back to Taiwan as a student. Haven't done military service. Currently holding a Taiwanese passport but it expired last year Sept 2013. I haven't tried to renew it.

I understand I am not exempted from the military service as I am still an ROC citizen, will I be able to avoid it by entering w/ visitor visa using a UK passport?

Help is much appreciated.


You won't have a problem as long as you don't stay too long.


Thanks BAH, turns out you were right. Although extremely nervous, I was able to leave Taiwan w/o any problems after my short stay via British passport.

Given the recent news from MND saying they'd go full on AVF by 2017, does this change the situation for us born before 1994? Or would I still have to wait until I'm 36/37 before I'd be exempt from the service lawfully?

I have a colleague with similar circumstances to mine recently mentioned that his parents received a notice on the government actively pursuing those who are still eligible for military service that are between age 33 and 37. Those who fail to turn up apparently would be sentenced up to 10 years which means no return even after the excemption age of 37 until the sentence is served. Has anyone heard of this? Seems rather extreme. I heard similiar stories while I was back earlier this year too but was more relative for grad students from the States.

I understand given Article 14 we are both still at risk but the chance has always been low (at least I was told here and I did roll the dice once earlier this year and didn't lose). With the presidential election looming, I wonder if there's anything else we should be watching out for... Personally I'm hoping to visit again end of this year for 2-3 weeks and was pretty comfortable with the thought of it. Now, not so sure anymore!
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Re: Military Conscription Rules for Dual Nationality Chinese

Postby graqfreak » 28 Jul 2015, 21:49

graqfreak wrote:
BAH wrote:
graqfreak wrote:Hello all,

I've recent obtained British Naturalisation. Once I securce a British passport I was hoping to go back and visit my family in Taiwan for a couple of weeks. Will I be able to go through immigration in/out using the British passport w/o any trouble?

I was born in Taipei in 1986. Been in the UK studying till 2008 and that was the last time I went back to Taiwan as a student. Haven't done military service. Currently holding a Taiwanese passport but it expired last year Sept 2013. I haven't tried to renew it.

I understand I am not exempted from the military service as I am still an ROC citizen, will I be able to avoid it by entering w/ visitor visa using a UK passport?

Help is much appreciated.


You won't have a problem as long as you don't stay too long.


Thanks BAH, turns out you were right. Although extremely nervous, I was able to leave Taiwan w/o any problems after my short stay via British passport.

Given the recent news from MND saying they'd go full on AVF by 2017, does this change the situation for us born before 1994? Or would I still have to wait until I'm 36/37 before I'd be exempt from the service lawfully?

I have a colleague with similar circumstances to mine recently mentioned that his parents received a notice on the government actively pursuing those who are still eligible for military service that are between age 33 and 37. Those who fail to turn up apparently would be sentenced up to 10 years which means no return even after the excemption age of 37 until the sentence is served. Has anyone heard of this? Seems rather extreme. I heard similiar stories while I was back earlier this year too but was more relative for grad students from the States.

I understand given Article 14 we are both still at risk but the chance has always been low (at least I was told here and I did roll the dice once earlier this year and didn't lose). With the presidential election looming, I wonder if there's anything else we should be watching out for... Personally I'm hoping to visit again end of this year for 2-3 weeks and was pretty comfortable with the thought of it. Now, not so sure anymore!


Just heard back from my colleague who recently returned to Taiwan for a short trip. Turns out the government is still actively continuing this process of recruiting those age 33 and older. According to his source (government official, friend of his dad apparently), once the paperwork is done, which is estimated to be within 4-5 months, the new rule will be strictly enforced.

Has no one heard of this? I can't seem to find any articles online on any new process being developed. I personally got a few more years before I reach that age but even still, this just means the odds are getting worse and I'm probably going to stop taking the risk in the near future...
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Re: Military Conscription Rules for Dual Nationality Chinese

Postby Hamletintaiwan » 29 Jul 2015, 18:03

graqfreak wrote:
graqfreak wrote:
BAH wrote:
graqfreak wrote:Hello all,

I've recent obtained British Naturalisation. Once I securce a British passport I was hoping to go back and visit my family in Taiwan for a couple of weeks. Will I be able to go through immigration in/out using the British passport w/o any trouble?

I was born in Taipei in 1986. Been in the UK studying till 2008 and that was the last time I went back to Taiwan as a student. Haven't done military service. Currently holding a Taiwanese passport but it expired last year Sept 2013. I haven't tried to renew it.

I understand I am not exempted from the military service as I am still an ROC citizen, will I be able to avoid it by entering w/ visitor visa using a UK passport?

Help is much appreciated.


You won't have a problem as long as you don't stay too long.


Thanks BAH, turns out you were right. Although extremely nervous, I was able to leave Taiwan w/o any problems after my short stay via British passport.

Given the recent news from MND saying they'd go full on AVF by 2017, does this change the situation for us born before 1994? Or would I still have to wait until I'm 36/37 before I'd be exempt from the service lawfully?

I have a colleague with similar circumstances to mine recently mentioned that his parents received a notice on the government actively pursuing those who are still eligible for military service that are between age 33 and 37. Those who fail to turn up apparently would be sentenced up to 10 years which means no return even after the excemption age of 37 until the sentence is served. Has anyone heard of this? Seems rather extreme. I heard similiar stories while I was back earlier this year too but was more relative for grad students from the States.

I understand given Article 14 we are both still at risk but the chance has always been low (at least I was told here and I did roll the dice once earlier this year and didn't lose). With the presidential election looming, I wonder if there's anything else we should be watching out for... Personally I'm hoping to visit again end of this year for 2-3 weeks and was pretty comfortable with the thought of it. Now, not so sure anymore!


Just heard back from my colleague who recently returned to Taiwan for a short trip. Turns out the government is still actively continuing this process of recruiting those age 33 and older. According to his source (government official, friend of his dad apparently), once the paperwork is done, which is estimated to be within 4-5 months, the new rule will be strictly enforced.

Has no one heard of this? I can't seem to find any articles online on any new process being developed. I personally got a few more years before I reach that age but even still, this just means the odds are getting worse and I'm probably going to stop taking the risk in the near future...


Of course you can't find much information about this.

Regarding the marked in red, who is meant by fail to turn up?
The once that received the official order to show up at a certain location and certain time?
If that's the case, they will need an official address so they can send you this official order.
Not following an order received from an Army superior is a crime which could lead to a ten years prison sentencing.
Evading the Army registration is probably a minor civil misdemeanor and most likely only carries a fine.

Simply don't get your name on any household registration.
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Re: Military Conscription Rules for Dual Nationality Chinese

Postby nealtaiwan » 04 Dec 2015, 13:14

Hello, anyone here who have been in Taiwan and exceeded once the 183 days but still able to get out of Taiwan? I want an answer from someone who experience it. haha. thanks! :)
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Re: Military Conscription Rules for Dual Nationality Chinese

Postby weskerlee321 » 27 Mar 2016, 17:15

graqfreak wrote:
BAH wrote:
graqfreak wrote:Hello all,

I've recent obtained British Naturalisation. Once I securce a British passport I was hoping to go back and visit my family in Taiwan for a couple of weeks. Will I be able to go through immigration in/out using the British passport w/o any trouble?

I was born in Taipei in 1986. Been in the UK studying till 2008 and that was the last time I went back to Taiwan as a student. Haven't done military service. Currently holding a Taiwanese passport but it expired last year Sept 2013. I haven't tried to renew it.

I understand I am not exempted from the military service as I am still an ROC citizen, will I be able to avoid it by entering w/ visitor visa using a UK passport?

Help is much appreciated.


You won't have a problem as long as you don't stay too long.


Thanks BAH, turns out you were right. Although extremely nervous, I was able to leave Taiwan w/o any problems after my short stay via British passport.

Given the recent news from MND saying they'd go full on AVF by 2017, does this change the situation for us born before 1994? Or would I still have to wait until I'm 36/37 before I'd be exempt from the service lawfully?

I have a colleague with similar circumstances to mine recently mentioned that his parents received a notice on the government actively pursuing those who are still eligible for military service that are between age 33 and 37. Those who fail to turn up apparently would be sentenced up to 10 years which means no return even after the excemption age of 37 until the sentence is served. Has anyone heard of this? Seems rather extreme. I heard similiar stories while I was back earlier this year too but was more relative for grad students from the States.

I understand given Article 14 we are both still at risk but the chance has always been low (at least I was told here and I did roll the dice once earlier this year and didn't lose). With the presidential election looming, I wonder if there's anything else we should be watching out for... Personally I'm hoping to visit again end of this year for 2-3 weeks and was pretty comfortable with the thought of it. Now, not so sure anymore!


Hello graqfreak, I'm in a very similar situation like you right now. May I ask that if you changed your name and birth place on your British passport?
Also, didn't they start to use finger print and facial recognition system at the airport couple years ago? So you entered and left without any problems? Did the officer ask you if you have Taiwanese passport?

Sorry I got so many questions to ask. But I really want to go back to visit my family. If you can help me that would be very helpful thanks!!
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Re: Military Conscription Rules for Dual Nationality Chinese

Postby Zla'od » 28 Mar 2016, 06:09

What--the British allow you to change your birthplace on your passport?! How does that work?
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