in-country health exam

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in-country health exam

Postby ncaraway » 07 Dec 2011, 15:33

I arrived in Taiwan a week ago and went to get the health exam for my visa health certificate. I'm in southern Taiwan. We called the Kaohsiung (Army) Veterans Hospital and they said they could do this. So we went there and started the process and were then told that, no, they don't do the immigration exam. They directed us to the Navy Hospital, which they assured us provided the exam. So we drove across Kaohsiung to the Navy Hospital where we were told that they offered this exam prior to November 29, 2011 but their agreement with Immigration expired and it won't be renewed until 1/1/2012. They directed us to E-Da Hospital. So we drove around Kaohsiung some more and yes, E-Da Hospital does provide the exam. One key difference, apparently, is that the Navy Hospital had included the MMR vaccine if it was needed. E-Da will charge extra for that.

Unfortunately, phoning in advance didn't seem to help since the answer you get on the phone may not be the correct one. I thought I'd share this in case it will help others.
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Re: in-country health exam

Postby justreal » 07 Dec 2011, 15:43

welcome to Taiwan, where the girls are girls and some of the guys are too. Hope you enjoy the stay.
Living in Taiwan, where the girls are women and most of the guys are too...
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Re: in-country health exam

Postby ncaraway » 09 Dec 2011, 13:57

The exam cost us just under $1500NT. I'll get the results in about one week. If it turns out that I need to get the MMR vaccine, that will cost extra. (I had the vaccine as a child in the US but don't have any record to prove it.)

On another note, I went to the Kaohsiung police station to apply for my criminal records. Total cost was just under $200NT, including the postage for them to mail me the results. This is in sharp contrast to what I had to pay for my FBI records in the US: $10US for fingerprints and $18US for the record itself, including postage.
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Re: in-country health exam

Postby Abacus » 10 Dec 2011, 14:39

the standard place to get the health exam in Kaohsiung is the Chung.Ho Hospital across from Carrefour at Shiquan (Shihcyuan) and Zihyou. I've done it there and at Datung Hospital (or something like that) on Jhonghua and Zhongzheng.

AFAIK you would still need to get the MMR vaccine even if you had a certificate from your childhood vaccination. vaccinations are not a lifetime deal. If you don't have the antibodies then they'll require it (AFAIK). You might not need the vaccination if you have a recent booster and you still don't have antibodies.
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Re: in-country health exam

Postby ncaraway » 14 Dec 2011, 17:22

Got my health report today and turns out I did need to get the MMR again, which was no problem (and considerably cheaper than in the States). I was pleasantly surprised to find that my local police report arrived in the mail too after only 6 days (took the FBI almost 2 months to get my US equivalent). Submitted the paperwork to Immigration today and was told to expect a household visit within the next 2 weeks.
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Re: in-country health exam

Postby babypillow » 14 Feb 2012, 02:00

Hi ! Can I check what visa are you applying for? I am planing on applying for a student visa and going to HK for it. However, when I spoke to the person in charge, she didn't mention the health certificate. However from some information in the website under Particular Requirements, it states the Health Certificate. From my understanding, only the school required one. Would appreciate any help as I am leaving for Hong Kong in 1 day's time! Thanks
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Re: in-country health exam

Postby EigerMarcus » 14 Feb 2012, 10:34

You used to need the following to apply for a student resident visa:

A. A certificate of enrollment issued by the Chinese language center.
B. Proof of financial support.
C. A passport, valid for no less than six months and having blank pages sufficient for permits, visas
and stamps. In addition, bring one copy of your passport.
D. One copy of the completed visa application form, to be signed by the applicant in person, and two 2x2-inch color photos taken within from the last six months.
E. A health certificate issued within the last three months.

The health certificate was the government's requirement not the school's. A quick check and ...

It is not required for a student visitor visa:

http://www.boca.gov.tw/content.asp?CuItem=4401

It is required for a student resident visa:

http://www.boca.gov.tw/fp?xItem=2094&ctNode=533&mp=2

Which type of student visa are you applying for?
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Re: in-country health exam

Postby emilrust » 26 Apr 2012, 17:21

Hi there!

I will arrive in Taipei in the beginning of July (so excited), to start "Mandarin summer camp" at NTNU, and then study at NTUST. I also need the Health certificate type B, and I was wondering if it was best to do it Taipei or in Europe?

It is my understanding that several foreigners do it in some hospital in Tapei, and the hospitals are used to these kind of requests (opposite of Europe really). What are your opinions/experience about this? I can't imagine going to a hospital in Norway, with my form in chinese, asking for a Tubercolis chest ray... :lol:

Best,

Emil
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