Receiving a copy of Taiwan Tax Return from Taiwan Tax Authorities?

ROC taxes, overseas payment of taxes, withholding rates, general tax liability issues, and other tax-related matters
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Receiving a copy of Taiwan Tax Return from Taiwan Tax Authorities?

Postby hoosiergooner » 29 May 2012, 21:01

The buxiban I work at claims to have filed tax returns for its staff and told us not to worry about it and now that the teachers are demanding copies of the tax returns for our records, the bosses are just giving us a run around and saying they cant do it (now), they asked us to wait for 2 months to have copies made, and they are uber defensive saying crap like we are the first employees to ask for copies.

It's pretty sketchy the justifications for the behavior and the lack of transparency in general, but I want a copy of my return to make sure that its correct, and that it was simply filed. I need a copy of it anyway for my future job when I leave this dump.

Im going to try and contact the tax authorities tomorrow, but was curious if people knew if you could request a copy of your tax return from the agency? If so, would you be able to go in and have a copy made or would you need to have them mail it?
hoosiergooner
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Re: Receiving a copy of Taiwan Tax Return from Taiwan Tax Authorities?

Postby neesh » 22 Jun 2012, 14:45

hoosiergooner wrote:The buxiban I work at claims to have filed tax returns for its staff and told us not to worry about it and now that the teachers are demanding copies of the tax returns for our records, the bosses are just giving us a run around and saying they cant do it (now), they asked us to wait for 2 months to have copies made, and they are uber defensive saying crap like we are the first employees to ask for copies.



If your employer reported your income and paid your taxes, his accountant will have records of income and taxes paid for 2011. Didn't your employer give you the Taiwan equivalent of the American "W2"? Forget about getting a "copy" of your tax return from your employer. You are on your own because I seriously doubt he photocopied your tax return before filing it. After all, he doesn't need it for his records. Additionally, your employer cannot legally go to the tax office and access any of your records unless he has a signed proxy from you, and your ID in hand. I would never sign any kind of paper that gives an employer those kinds of rights.

If your employer filed a paper tax return, your employer should have a numbered paper receipt . Tax return forms have a small section at the bottom which tax office clerks date stamp, tear off, and give to the person filing the form. You can take the receipt, and your ARC to the tax office and access your filing info. No receipt? No problem. The system is computerized, so the clerk at the foreign taxpayer desk can access your income and tax records via ARC.

Did you watch your employer fill out your tax return? Did you know that you have to prove the number of days you were in country? In the old days you had to let the tax clerk look at your passport. Did your employer take your passport and ARC when he filed your return? Did you know that if you were in Taiwan for more than 183 calendar days in 2011, you are classified as a resident, and you are eligible to take quite sizable deductions and exemptions on your earnings, thus reducing your tax liability? A lot of teachers legally working here receive tax refunds from the government. If you were not here for more than 183 days last year, you are out of luck. All your reported income was taxed at 20 percent, and you are not entitled to a refund, or to any exemptions or deductions.

One more important point. if you want to process an ARC in 2012, you will HAVE TO submit a "blue form" from the tax office which lists your total reported 2011 income and taxes.

Where do you live? Go to the tax office and go to the foreign tax payer desk. I live in Sanchong, but I don't have to go to the New Taipei City main tax office to access my tax info. I can go to the small branch office here in Sanchong District.

good luck
neesh
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