Tyre Treatment?

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Tyre Treatment?

Postby Ducked » 05 Apr 2012, 11:47

Taiwan seems to be tough on tyres. I think ozone, along with the sunlight and the heat, attacks them.

Mine are showing sidewall cracks, though I don't do many miles and keep them on the high side of the recommended pressure.

Low mileage may actually be worse, since I've read that there's a wax incorporated in the compound which is forced to the surface by flexion, so an idle tyre dries out.

If that's true, waxing your tyres might be worthwhile. Whitewalls might be advantageous too, though they'd look a bit silly on my car. Subaru Casa Blanca, perhaps.

Anyway, what I actually tried was, of course, sunflower oil, the idea being that it'll form a semi-flexible coating on the surface of the sidewall.

I've read a couple of (US DOD, I think) refs to SO as a rubber-protectant. OTOH, there's debate in the diesels-on-veg-oil "community" as to whether veg oil attacks rubber seals, so the literature is inconsistent, as they say.

Pictures show outer tyre sidewalls about 10 mins after the sixth (and probably final) daily treatment with sunflower oil.

I treated the NS front tyre and the OS rear, with the other two as "controls", selected because a dog had pissed on the OS front, so more-or-less at random, but with an uncontrolled variable, unless I can get it to piss on the other tyres as well.

The treated tyres look better subjectively, but the tyres probably varied anyway, and I neglected to take "before" pictures, which might have been informative.

The oil can be seen to be "drying" patchy, and in fact seems to soak in, which I didn't expect. If I had, I wouldn't have used SO, since its relatively unstable. My best guess is that, medium term, it'll stiffen the tyre internally and actually accelerate the rate of deterioration.

Of course there is some potential for dangerous loss-of-grip here, but I think its limited. I don't drive the car while theres visible oil sheen on the sidewall, and not usually the same day, so any migration to the tread surface should be minimal. Emergency stops tests pre and post treatment show no noticable difference.

After I did this I read that one of the big tyre producers was using SO to enhance grip, but I think that's irrelevant either way, since they'll incorporate it into the compound.

Front OS untreated

http://www.flickr.com/photos/31043052@N06/6900646920/

Image
IMG_0113 by ed_lithgow, on Flickr

Front OS untreated detail

http://www.flickr.com/photos/31043052@N06/7046744391/

Image
IMG_0114 by ed_lithgow, on Flickr

Front NS tyrewall 10 mins after the sixth daily treatment with sunflower oil
http://www.flickr.com/photos/31043052@N06/6900651372/

Image
IMG_0115 by ed_lithgow, on Flickr

Front Nearside treated detail
http://www.flickr.com/photos/31043052@N06/6900653460/

Image
IMG_0110 by ed_lithgow, on Flickr
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Re: Tyre Treatment?

Postby Micahel » 05 Apr 2012, 13:20

Cracks in the tires are mainly from sitting to long and drying out in the sun. I have never had this problem with my cars, because like most Americans, I drove my cars everyday, however, I had sail boats for may years and this was common with the trailer tires which would would have little or no road wear and sat for long periods (entire winter). We used Armour All tire protect which besides making tires shiney, supposidly nouishes the rubber. Not sure if it is availble here but likely so, or something similar.

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Re: Tyre Treatment?

Postby Ducked » 05 Apr 2012, 14:16

Yes, I agree that my tyre cracking is probably a combination of underuse and the climate here.

I think I've vaguely heard of that Armor-all stuff. There was also something called, IIRC, Aerospace (?) Protectant 303, recommended in a marine context, I think for inflatable boats.

Things are difficult to find in Taiwan, though. If it conferred "shinyness", there might well be a market for it, but if it was just a maintenance product with a matte finish, Taiwanese wouldn't be interested.

I also have a weakness for half-assed ghetto improvisations, and the experiment is now underway. If I buy new tyres, which I might have to do fairly soon, I'll look-into designer solutions
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Re: Tyre Treatment?

Postby sandman » 05 Apr 2012, 14:18

Ducked wrote:Things are difficult to find in Taiwan, though.

Any car valeting place or scooter repair place will have it.
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Re: Tyre Treatment?

Postby sulavaca » 05 Apr 2012, 14:43

I can only pick out the production date clearly on this tyre:

Image

This states it was produced in October, 2005, which makes the tyre potentially dangerous and outside of any manufacturer's recommended usage period. The fact that it is cracking up now suggests that the rubber and carbon black compound it is produced from has become unstable and prone to failure. You will also notice that running this tyre as opposed to a new tyre will result in much greater road noise. This is because the rubber compound is now relatively brittle and will not flex or grip as well as it was designed to.
Continue using this tyre at your own risk, but I would recommend a new replacement.
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Re: Tyre Treatment?

Postby Ducked » 05 Apr 2012, 14:54

I've seen various claims that "leading" showroom tyre valetting products contain silicon oil and organic solvents that attack the rubber, so "pretty" may not be the same as "protected".

I suspect the target includes Armour-all, though of course they aren't specified.

The makers of Aerospace 303 protectant make this claim particularly forcefully, though of course they would, having a vested interest in talking down the competition.

A sample:-

http://www.autoeducation.com/carcare/tires.htm

http://www.303products.com/techinfo/tires1.htm

and a recipe:-

http://www.scprod.com/formularies/Tire%20Protectant.pdf

You takes yer choice, and you pays yer money.

Or you dont.
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Re: Tyre Treatment?

Postby sandman » 05 Apr 2012, 15:30

Ducked wrote:I've seen various claims that "leading" showroom tyre valetting products contain silicon oil and organic solvents that attack the rubber, so "pretty" may not be the same as "protected".


But your tyres are already death traps! I don't expect that even ArmorTheEntireUniverseAnd Beyond is going to offer much in the way of protection for those particular shoes! :lol:
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Re: Tyre Treatment?

Postby Ducked » 05 Apr 2012, 15:36

sulavaca wrote:I can only pick out the production date clearly on this tyre:

This states it was produced in October, 2005, which makes the tyre potentially dangerous and outside of any manufacturer's recommended usage period........etc, see above


Continue using this tyre at your own risk, but I would recommend a new replacement.


Thanks Mr S. Duly noted.

(Thought that might happen).

Discussion of tyre age:-

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=138
EDIT : The article refers to two tyre industry associations that have made recommendations

“The British Rubber Manufacturers Association (BRMA) recommended practice issued June, 2001, states "BRMA members strongly recommend that unused tyres should not be put into service if they are over six years old and that all tyres should be replaced ten years from the date of their manufacture."

The British Tyre Manufacturers Association current recommendation, in contrast, says bugger-all, referring the reader to the vehicle owners handbook.

http://www.btmauk.com/data/files/Tyre_service_life_recommendations_31_May_2011.pfd

Mine is in Chinese. I'd bet the price of a new set of tyres that it says bugger-all too, but then its 25 years old.

Perhaps more relevantly for local conditions, they also refer to The Japan Automobile Tire Manufacturers Association (JATMA) who's recommended practice issued May, 2005, is quoted as stating:-

" it is recommended that all tires (including spare tires) that were made more than ten years ago be replaced with new tires." though they also attempt to pass the buck to the owners handbook.

So both these recommendations, including the one from the famously anal Japanese, [EDIT: That should perhaps be now be "famously (at least until Fukushima) anal Japanese"] are for 10 years.

These are of course general recommendations and not necessarily best current practice.

Bridgestone-Firestone has apparently adopted the Japanese recommendation, with the caveat that there is/was no specific technical basis for it.

http://www.safetyresearch.net/2006/01/01/number-of-tire-age/
“we believe it is appropriate to follow the JATMA recommendation in the interest of further encouraging consumers to focus on the importance of maintaining and properly replacing their tires.”

They also defer to the owners handbook.

Ford and Chrysler apparently recommend 6 years regardless of tread or use. They get sued a lot, as you might expect.

This gives them a vested interest slightly different to that of the tyre producers, who don't want to get stuck with ageing inventory.

http://thesafetyrecord.safetyresearch.net/2010/11/18/tire-age-issue-still-languishing-in-us/
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Re: Tyre Treatment?

Postby Ducked » 05 Apr 2012, 15:43

sandman wrote:
Ducked wrote:I've seen various claims that "leading" showroom tyre valetting products contain silicon oil and organic solvents that attack the rubber, so "pretty" may not be the same as "protected".


But your tyres are already death traps! I don't expect that even ArmorTheEntireUniverseAnd Beyond is going to offer much in the way of protection for those particular shoes! :lol:


So its a separate issue.

As I said above, I'll look into "designer solutions" when I have to buy new tyres, which will probably be quite soon.
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Re: Tyre Treatment?

Postby Ducked » 05 Apr 2012, 17:40

http://www.safetyresearch.net/safety-issues/tires/

Animation on tyre ageing/failure mechanism.

Apparently air-permeation from inside the tyre is a significant contribution to oxidative degredation of the material.

Didn't know that, though it makes sense.

Wouldnt be that hard to inflate with CO2. Bit of yeast and sugar..... :ponder:
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