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220v Korean Rice cooker - using in Taiwan

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220v Korean Rice cooker - using in Taiwan

Postby AnneV » 28 Apr 2012, 17:38

Hello,

I am moving to Taiwan later this year and was wondering if I would be able to use my Korean rice cooker in Taiwan. It is a 220v rice cooker with a Korean shaped plug (I am in Korea right now).
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Re: 220v Korean Rice cooker - using in Taiwan

Postby ceevee369 » 28 Apr 2012, 21:07

3 possibilities:

a. You are lucky and find yourself a 220V plug in your place (as the old Airco's use 220V here)
b. if you only have 110V @ your future place, you can consider buying a powerful convertor (220 to 110V) but seen the potential "Watt' these things need - only OK if your rice cooker is one of those fancy full Electronic onces with 50 menus
C. Buy a cheap local one for 30 to 50 USD if its is only for cooking rice.

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Re: 220v Korean Rice cooker - using in Taiwan

Postby finley » 28 Apr 2012, 21:22

ceevee369 wrote:b. if you only have 110V @ your future place, you can consider buying a powerful convertor (220 to 110V) but seen the potential "Watt' these things need

or 110 to 220 :D

These are easily available in the electronics shops near ZhongXiao Xinsheng MRT, in various sizes. As ceevee just said, check the power rating and size the transformer appropriately, but it might not be worth the outlay unless you have other 220V kit you want to use. Big ones (500W+) are not cheap. Anyway, most houses have 220V (for aircon), even older ones. You just need to fit the appropriate plug.
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Re: 220v Korean Rice cooker - using in Taiwan

Postby AnneV » 28 Apr 2012, 21:55

Ok, Thank you very much for your replies. I understand.

I would like to bring it with me because it is a very nice cooker with functions for white rice, brown rice, sprouted rice, porridge, soup, stew/slow cook, and steam cooking. Not sure if you can get that in a 50 USD cooker. I guess if it doesn't work out, then I will just bring it back to Korea and give it to a friend there, since I already plan to return to Korea from Taiwan next year.
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Re: 220v Korean Rice cooker - using in Taiwan

Postby Taiwan Luthiers » 29 Apr 2012, 11:06

AnneV wrote:Ok, Thank you very much for your replies. I understand.

I would like to bring it with me because it is a very nice cooker with functions for white rice, brown rice, sprouted rice, porridge, soup, stew/slow cook, and steam cooking. Not sure if you can get that in a 50 USD cooker. I guess if it doesn't work out, then I will just bring it back to Korea and give it to a friend there, since I already plan to return to Korea from Taiwan next year.


There are 220 everywhere. Even at a new place, that uses split AC will have 220 at the box. Its just that split ACs are hard wired. You can go to the box and get a 220 line out, there are 2 110 lines and when combined will get you 220. You wire them across the 2 live pins (for a European style plug) without a need for a neutral.
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Re: 220v Korean Rice cooker - using in Taiwan

Postby ceevee369 » 30 Apr 2012, 21:37

AnneV wrote:Ok, Thank you very much for your replies. I understand.

I would like to bring it with me because it is a very nice cooker with functions for white rice, brown rice, sprouted rice, porridge, soup, stew/slow cook, and steam cooking. Not sure if you can get that in a 50 USD cooker. I guess if it doesn't work out, then I will just bring it back to Korea and give it to a friend there, since I already plan to return to Korea from Taiwan next year.


I knew it would be one of those fancy ones playing a Bach Sonate when the rice is ready :lol:
Well, as TW Luther said and referring to previous posts - most likely you will either have already a plug with 220 Volt (if correctly place - they are colored red) or you can ask an electrician - with the fiat from your landlord to wire a 220 V connection.
Happy cooking !
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