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What to expect from living in Taiwan?

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Re: What to expect from living in Taiwan?

Postby PigBloodCake » 18 Jun 2012, 12:19

KobeBryant81 wrote:I am aware of the military time but I don't mind that too much since I figure it might be a good way to meet people and get used to some of the culture.


Expect to be picked on/bullied.

But yes, that is what I am afraid of, if I go back to Taiwan and it doesn't really benefit me. I don't mind if I must struggle for a while but I am weighing-in on my options for the long term future.


And live like an illegal immigrant? Puh-leese, you don't know what you're missing in the 'wan if you don't move back. Just get your 4-year degree in Marketing and return with a renewed passport from 台北經濟文化辦事處. Renew your household registration from your old borough (ask your parents if you don't know) and get your National ID card quickly. Do your 1 year conscription and you're free.
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Re: What to expect from living in Taiwan?

Postby Taiwan Luthiers » 18 Jun 2012, 12:35

If you have your degree take advantage of the new executive order as soon as you can. The military don't seem to like ABC's so expect to be treated like shit.
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What to expect from living in Taiwan?

Postby headhonchoII » 18 Jun 2012, 17:45

Don't come back to Taiwan now that you can become legal there, the chance may never open up again. As for 'jumping the plane' it was the parents that did that not the children. The OP deserves a chance to be incorporated into society. After all the idea of birth right to become a citizen is pretty dumb if you think about it.
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Re: What to expect from living in Taiwan?

Postby Taiwan Luthiers » 18 Jun 2012, 17:48

headhonchoII wrote:Don't come back to Taiwan now that you can become legal there, the chance may never open up again. As for 'jumping the plane' it was the parents that did that not the children. The OP deserves a chance to be incorporated into society. After all the idea of birth right to become a citizen is pretty dumb if you think about it.


Especially considering how the rest of America seems to think that an immigration violation is a crime no matter the age of the person... it's really messed up because most are really misinformed about immigration, as in they think it's easy.
Cat-gut strings are made from kitten guts, stretched out to near breaking point and then hardened with grue saliva. As a result these give a feeling of Pain and anguish whenever played, and often end up playing themselves backwards as part of satanic rituals.

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Re: What to expect from living in Taiwan?

Postby steelersman » 18 Jun 2012, 20:52

Taiwan Luthiers wrote:
headhonchoII wrote:Don't come back to Taiwan now that you can become legal there, the chance may never open up again. As for 'jumping the plane' it was the parents that did that not the children. The OP deserves a chance to be incorporated into society. After all the idea of birth right to become a citizen is pretty dumb if you think about it.


Especially considering how the rest of America seems to think that an immigration violation is a crime no matter the age of the person... it's really messed up because most are really misinformed about immigration, as in they think it's easy.


Not to mention that the average American doesn't understand the importance of those illegal immigrants to the economy. Who will do the farm labor in the United States if they kick out illegal Mexicans?
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Re: What to expect from living in Taiwan?

Postby Taiwan Luthiers » 18 Jun 2012, 21:04

steelersman wrote:
Taiwan Luthiers wrote:
headhonchoII wrote:Don't come back to Taiwan now that you can become legal there, the chance may never open up again. As for 'jumping the plane' it was the parents that did that not the children. The OP deserves a chance to be incorporated into society. After all the idea of birth right to become a citizen is pretty dumb if you think about it.


Especially considering how the rest of America seems to think that an immigration violation is a crime no matter the age of the person... it's really messed up because most are really misinformed about immigration, as in they think it's easy.


Not to mention that the average American doesn't understand the importance of those illegal immigrants to the economy. Who will do the farm labor in the United States if they kick out illegal Mexicans?


Even less understand that it's only "illegal" because the government made it so. If getting a green card in the US didn't require a minimum of 1 million USD investment or a highly valued work (I don't mean skills, I mean being very famous or distinguished), there would not be any "illegal" immigrants. They only exist because governments all over the world has made immigration "illegal". I heard back in the day all it took to get a green card was to show up, pass a health check and be willing to learn English.

You know just about everyone who is mega rich in Taiwan has a US passport.
Cat-gut strings are made from kitten guts, stretched out to near breaking point and then hardened with grue saliva. As a result these give a feeling of Pain and anguish whenever played, and often end up playing themselves backwards as part of satanic rituals.

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Re: What to expect from living in Taiwan?

Postby steelersman » 18 Jun 2012, 21:08

Taiwan Luthiers wrote:
steelersman wrote:
Taiwan Luthiers wrote:
headhonchoII wrote:Don't come back to Taiwan now that you can become legal there, the chance may never open up again. As for 'jumping the plane' it was the parents that did that not the children. The OP deserves a chance to be incorporated into society. After all the idea of birth right to become a citizen is pretty dumb if you think about it.


Especially considering how the rest of America seems to think that an immigration violation is a crime no matter the age of the person... it's really messed up because most are really misinformed about immigration, as in they think it's easy.


Not to mention that the average American doesn't understand the importance of those illegal immigrants to the economy. Who will do the farm labor in the United States if they kick out illegal Mexicans?


Even less understand that it's only "illegal" because the government made it so. If getting a green card in the US didn't require a minimum of 1 million USD investment or a highly valued work (I don't mean skills, I mean being very famous or distinguished), there would not be any "illegal" immigrants. They only exist because governments all over the world has made immigration "illegal". I heard back in the day all it took to get a green card was to show up, pass a health check and be willing to learn English.

You know just about everyone who is mega rich in Taiwan has a US passport.


Not to mention that one can simply become an American by being born in the United States. How many children of well off Taiwanese are born in the US? I know plenty of them. Students who attend the American school who are American in the only sense that they have a passport. They don't even speak English correctly.
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Re: What to expect from living in Taiwan?

Postby PigBloodCake » 18 Jun 2012, 22:04

headhonchoII wrote:Don't come back to Taiwan now that you can become legal there, the chance may never open up again.


HHII, WTH are you talking about? Obama is simply NOT enforcing the deportation of illegals based on criteria which OP happens to meet. That's not to say that he's legal there.

Without a valid social security number, he can't legally work in US.

As for 'jumping the plane' it was the parents that did that not the children.


No shit.

The OP deserves a chance to be incorporated into society.


Like I said, the last amnesty program was for anyone who stayed in US before 1986. Only US Congress has the power to pass another amnesty law.

After all the idea of birth right to become a citizen is pretty dumb if you think about it.


Yeah, please tell that to all the slave children before the American Civil War.
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Re: What to expect from living in Taiwan?

Postby PigBloodCake » 18 Jun 2012, 22:17

Taiwan Luthiers wrote:My Mandarin level is much better than the OP but had the same issue too.

If you can't stick it out in the US (you can also work online even in the US) then come back to Taiwan, do your military (you may or may not like it... the cultural difference and defeatist attitude really gets me "Kill the commanding officer if China attacks and surrender"??) Then after military try and get yourself in the position of starting a business, because it's the ONLY way to make any real money in Taiwan. Employed work pays like crap but will give experience. The problem with online work is that the income is often inconsistent.

Forget university... English programs favor foreigners and having a TW passport is actually a curse here. You would have to take the regular entrance exam, which I haven't taken but if it's anywhere near as hard as the exam for government jobs, you have NO chance. It would take at least 10 years at Shi-Da to be able to get to the point where you can have a chance at passing those exams. Remember most Taiwanese study at least 10 hours a day, going to cram schools, for the last 12 years in order to even do mediocre at those exams! Besides there are so many college grads here (many of whom actually have a degree at a US Ivy League school) that employers aren't interested in hearing about which school you went to. If you have the right skill set they will hire you regardless of your degrees. Also, you don't need a degree to start a business. If you really need a degree then you may consider University of Phoenix if you can afford it, but seriously I feel its a waste of time and money because I never really got to use the degree. In that case all they really want to see is your high school transcript from the US and they won't make you take a TOFEL if you show them a US High School diploma, much easier than taking the Taiwan college entrance exam in my opinion.

About a 10 year ban, might as well consider it a lifetime ban because US is so paranoid that even a little smudge on your record is grounds for exclusion or refusal of visa/entry. Visa Wavier DOES NOT APPLY if you have ever overstayed, even once, and unlike many other countries, US actively deports and excludes those who overstayed as a child... they do not care. Although it does depend on who you talk to... because immigration guys (whoever at the window that is) have absolute power in deciding if you can get a visa.


Frankly, TL is giving a pretty damn great advice here.

On the business part, it really depends on whether the OP has the knack and the luck to make it here. For 1% of folks who made it ok here in the 'wan, business-wise, there are 99% of those who fail. I wouldn't press my luck there.
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Re: What to expect from living in Taiwan?

Postby Taiwan Luthiers » 18 Jun 2012, 22:49

PigBloodCake wrote:
Taiwan Luthiers wrote:My Mandarin level is much better than the OP but had the same issue too.

If you can't stick it out in the US (you can also work online even in the US) then come back to Taiwan, do your military (you may or may not like it... the cultural difference and defeatist attitude really gets me "Kill the commanding officer if China attacks and surrender"??) Then after military try and get yourself in the position of starting a business, because it's the ONLY way to make any real money in Taiwan. Employed work pays like crap but will give experience. The problem with online work is that the income is often inconsistent.

Forget university... English programs favor foreigners and having a TW passport is actually a curse here. You would have to take the regular entrance exam, which I haven't taken but if it's anywhere near as hard as the exam for government jobs, you have NO chance. It would take at least 10 years at Shi-Da to be able to get to the point where you can have a chance at passing those exams. Remember most Taiwanese study at least 10 hours a day, going to cram schools, for the last 12 years in order to even do mediocre at those exams! Besides there are so many college grads here (many of whom actually have a degree at a US Ivy League school) that employers aren't interested in hearing about which school you went to. If you have the right skill set they will hire you regardless of your degrees. Also, you don't need a degree to start a business. If you really need a degree then you may consider University of Phoenix if you can afford it, but seriously I feel its a waste of time and money because I never really got to use the degree. In that case all they really want to see is your high school transcript from the US and they won't make you take a TOFEL if you show them a US High School diploma, much easier than taking the Taiwan college entrance exam in my opinion.

About a 10 year ban, might as well consider it a lifetime ban because US is so paranoid that even a little smudge on your record is grounds for exclusion or refusal of visa/entry. Visa Wavier DOES NOT APPLY if you have ever overstayed, even once, and unlike many other countries, US actively deports and excludes those who overstayed as a child... they do not care. Although it does depend on who you talk to... because immigration guys (whoever at the window that is) have absolute power in deciding if you can get a visa.


Frankly, TL is giving a pretty damn great advice here.

On the business part, it really depends on whether the OP has the knack and the luck to make it here. For 1% of folks who made it ok here in the 'wan, business-wise, there are 99% of those who fail. I wouldn't press my luck there.


Yes, but you can't just start a business just because you want to make more money and you don't care what you do. For restaurants or coffee bars, you need to do your research, location matters a lot and it helps to offer something really unique too. For example don't become a legal consultant if you don't know anything about laws, and cramming at the last minute will NOT help you here. Do what you're best at, if you have skills in car repair, start an auto repair shop as soon as you have the money to get a place and some tools. You don't need to buy all the tools at once, you can always start small and work your way up. But seriously don't come to Taiwan unless you like Asia, and if you have no choice allow time to prepare yourself. You can get used to it but it's going to be a very long culture shock, especially when locals do not see you as a Taiwanese and therefore discriminates you just like any other foreigner, yet still expects you to bear the responsibility of a Taiwanese (hong baos, taxes, military, etc.)

Obama asked the DHS not to deport child immigrants, but there's no telling how long that will last as the executive order only last 2 years, and if a right wing president wins the next election you can bet things will be much worse. Xenophobia in the US only goes in one direction, and that is worse. You may even just decide to prepare (and use the two year for this) and come to Taiwan because the way things are, its only a matter of time before more civil liberties are eroded (as if things aren't bad enough already). As bad as things seem in Taiwan they are slowly improving and as a nation Taiwan is actually pretty rich compared to the US. Lots of trade surplus, low if any public and private debt and limited government spending. It's also easier to start a business here than the US because you don't have too many laws stopping you, or if laws are there they're kinda not enforced. In this case use your 2 years to gain the experience you need to start a business.

If you do end up coming back I can help with some of the adjustment thing and how to find things too. One thing you will have to get used to is that names for stuff in Taiwan are not the same for the US, and a direct translation will not help you. Also its hard to find many things, and the "Where can I find" forum isn't always helpful if you're looking for stuff the average expat doesn't look for (like lumber). Get used to fireworks too, because people do light them at any time, especially outside Taipei city.
Cat-gut strings are made from kitten guts, stretched out to near breaking point and then hardened with grue saliva. As a result these give a feeling of Pain and anguish whenever played, and often end up playing themselves backwards as part of satanic rituals.

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