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Just a farm house

Topics related to Taiwan and Taiwan/China issues can be discussed here. Threads dealing with Taiwan's history belong in the Culture & History thread. Please do not post articles - use links instead. Quoted sources should be limited to one paragraph in length, or less. If you see a post that you feel is against the rules, please send a report to the moderators so we can look into it
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Threads dealing with Taiwan's history belong in the Culture & History thread. Please do not post articles - use links instead. Quoted sources should be limited to one paragraph in length, or less. If you see a post that you feel is against the rules, you can send a report to the moderators so we can look into it

Re: Just a farm house

Postby meyers66 » 25 May 2015, 15:59

Hi,
I see this a little differently. I think many Taiwanese dream of having a farmhouse and growing their own food. (Food is sacrosanct here. Mess with their food or critique it and you have a problem.) Farming veggies is certainly a big part of my Taiwanese families lifestyle. There's bartering going on all the time.
The problem is the cost of farmland. I was given these numbers this week. Farmland price / acre in NTD 1. Taiwan 15 million, 2. Japan 2.4 million, 3. S. Korea 1.5million, 4. Holland 1.4 million, 5. Germany 290,000, 6. France 110,000, 7. USA 90,000. No citation.
Many Taiwanese want to retire to a farm and live there. (Who wouldn't. I do.;) My evidence is personal experience. In Hsinchu County I've been cycling the northern area for 8 years. In the past 3 a tremendous amount of land has been replanted, built on, sold, or fenced. It has changed my cycling experience. The land ping price is up at least 4x's. The Taiwanese I see know something is wrong with the quality of food and they are taking steps to grow their own. The urban Taiwanese ignore the polluted fast food at their own peril.
But passing Farmland Regulations in haste is idiotic. Where's the research?
Taiwan is the last Chinese culture that allows land ownership. All the others lease it. Think about that. Please correct me if I'm wrong.

I sense this Regulation is only 25% of the agriculture land plan. The other 75% is in the "black box" that mainstream media (MSM) isn't prevue to. Hell MSM is pathetic.
The question is who benefits from this hasty Farmland Regulation and why? My answer is corporations and Mainland China. What's yours?
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Re: Just a farm house

Postby finley » 25 May 2015, 17:03

What he said.

Farmland is being priced as residential land because, in practice, that's what it is. There are no real limits on what you're allowed to pour concrete on or what you must preserve for crop-growing. So businesses buy that land (with funny money that only they have access to), build on it, and sell it on at obscene profits.
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Re: Just a farm house

Postby Flakman » 25 May 2015, 22:36

Since I live in a "farmhouse" as do some of my friends I am quite interested in the proposed changes regarding building farmhouses. In fact, we were discussing this again earlier today. From what we have heard or read....sorry, my Chinese is poor so maybe some loose translation below....

Changes:
* Farmhouse owners need to be "registered farmers" as members of agricultural union.
* Existing regulations will be closely audited. Example is building over the 1/10 limit (as discussed earlier farmhouse foundation size cannot exceed 1/10 of farmland size). Other subsequently built structures (after original housing permit received) would also be illegal. Violators will be fined and some structures (or even houses) will need to be torn down. Another focus will be on the amount of farmland actually used for farming.

Expected results:
* Prices of farmland will drop. Well, in Hualian the prices have stopped rising (from what we have seen).
* Attraction of building a farmhouse will drop. You not only have these changes but other discussed changes which might prevent actually building a house on any farmland you have bought. Just becoming dangerous to buy farmland with hope of building a farmhouse.....laws could change at any time. Even if you build are various ways could be fined.
* Prices of farmhouses will drop as in order to buy a farmhouse you must be member of agricultural union. This means you cannot just sell your farmhouse to just anyone...but must find union member.

What we are damn curious to see what will happen...
Many, many B&Bs built on farmland are illegal and greatly exceed room amount for B&Bs. Those of us who want to actually farm on our farmland hate seeing this abuse of farmland while not even paying taxes as don't pay hotel taxes. Will they actually be fined? Structures torn down?

Interesting...
The farmer next to us has been receiving money for not farming. Now good chance we will get fined for growing too little.
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Re: Just a farm house

Postby *monkey* » 25 May 2015, 23:44

Flakman wrote:
Interesting...
The farmer next to us has been receiving money for not farming. Now good chance we will get fined for growing too little.


Excellent farming strategy.

Almost as good as having dumb tourists pay for the privilige of picking the crop.
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Re: Just a farm house

Postby headhonchoII » 25 May 2015, 23:47

What about the thousands of illegal factories built on farmland in Taiwan. Taiwan's farmland management is crazy. There is a lot of corruption in local government, they DO take hong baos from locals and blow-ins.
Notice any farmers GIANT B&Bs getting knocked down in QIng Jing...I didn't think so.

The move to the countryside is because an apartment dweller in Taipei can sell his/her 60 year old concrete shithole and buy a 'villa' with change left over in Yilan or Hualian or Miaoli. Makes sense doesn't it, why woudn't people do this if they had the option? Retirement..many were civil servants.

A while back they were paying farmers to keep land fallow, but now it seems they changed the regulation and there is an obligation to farm. There are many farmers who rent land from others, like my uncle-in-law, loads of landowners couldn't be bothered farming themselves.
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Re: Just a farm house

Postby Bob Violence » 26 May 2015, 12:58

meyers66 wrote:Taiwan is the last Chinese culture that allows land ownership. All the others lease it. Think about that. Please correct me if I'm wrong.


Macau has some tiny slivers of freehold land that are now largely occupied by luxury residential developments. About 20% of the land in Singapore is freehold, though I don't know if you're counting it as a "Chinese culture." It's also possible to get a 999-year lease there. But certainly neither are comparable to Taiwan, where most land is freehold.

My own story on farming in Taiwan: I know a guy who inherited some farmland from a relative about twenty years ago, has never resided on it, has never done anything with it, and got a subsidy for doing nothing with it. He also got some sort of farmer's subsidy for his health insurance. He has never worked in the agricultural sector and spends about two months out of the year in Taiwan. I haven't spoken to him about it for a couple of years, so I don't know if the situation has changed (from the way headhonchoII talks, it probably has).
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