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Re: Dogging My Footsteps

PostPosted: 27 Sep 2013, 14:12
by Icon
After fighting against them two years ago and almost losing the battle... hell, no!

Re: Dogging My Footsteps

PostPosted: 04 Oct 2013, 10:05
by Ducked
Update in case anyone's interested. Goh-2 seems to have recovered from the immediate effects of the treatment.

There's no obvious improvement in general condition, but I suppose that wouldn't be expected yet. This infection is apparently difficult to clear, and its apparently difficult to tell when it has cleared, since the antibodies persist, though they don't confer immunity to re-infection. There are also autoimmune sequalae which continue even when the bacteria are gone.

From a quick check a few days ago he still seems to have ticks, despite the vet's treatment, though they may have been dead ones still embedded (if that happens?)

I'll try and have a better look, but have been preoccupied with work lately, and (after the visit to the vet) he's not so easy to handle.

Re: Dogging My Footsteps

PostPosted: 26 Oct 2013, 09:49
by Ex Animo
We have 120 dogs in what should be a tick-infested area, but we count maybe one or two ticks found on maybe one or two dogs every one or two months. That's because the dogs all get garlic every day—about one clove per 20 kg. It works. Wisely skeptical Forumosans tested my claim in a previous thread and all reported that garlic was more efficient at keeping ticks off dogs than the parasiticides that people usually use. Try it and see.

Re: Dogging My Footsteps

PostPosted: 26 Oct 2013, 09:52
by Ex Animo
And, by the way, we've had a great success rate treating ehrlichiosis (and babesiosis). For severe cases, where the dog has become anaemic and very weak, a blood transfusion is usually necessary and successful. We have donor dogs who have saved the lives of several dogs with severe babesiosis; we'll be happy to lend them for a blood transfusion for your campus dog if needed.

Seán 0920 620 109

Re: Dogging My Footsteps

PostPosted: 06 May 2016, 19:39
by Ducked
Ex Animo wrote:And, by the way, we've had a great success rate treating ehrlichiosis (and babesiosis). For severe cases, where the dog has become anaemic and very weak, a blood transfusion is usually necessary and successful. We have donor dogs who have saved the lives of several dogs with severe babesiosis; we'll be happy to lend them for a blood transfusion for your campus dog if needed.

Seán 0920 620 109


Didn't see this at the time, but a belated thanks.

Here we go again. Same dog lacks energy and is coughing, and mosquito population seems to have exploded this year, probably due to the atypical rainfall, so heart worm seems very likely.

I'll need to get him to a vet, which won't be easy, since he's got a long memory for needles, plus my car's broken.

If he's clear I suppose I'll have to start him on preventatives, though I dunno if he'll take pills.

I've also wondered about the practicality of some sort of mosquito-proof kennel or mesh tent. Can dogs used to sleeping out be trained to use such a thing?