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Blog: Waterfalls, Wild Hot Springs, and Camping. A GPS-ridden guide to nature swimming in Taiwan

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Blog: Waterfalls, Wild Hot Springs, and Camping. A GPS-ridden guide to nature swimming in Taiwan

Postby asher » 23 May 2016, 14:49

Hi Everyone. I invite you to check out my travel in taiwan blog. It's focused on outdoors, mostly waterfalls, wild hot springs and natural places to swim and camp in the wild. Each page has a custom google map associated with it. You can open these maps on your smartphone and use your GPS to guide you to where you're going. Since internet service often doesn't work deep in the mountains, once you open the map, you no longer need internet to follow the paths. The GPS signal is enough. With the exception of a few places with small parking fees, everywhere on this blog is free of charge.

http://www.followxiaofei.com/region

let me know what you think, I welcome any suggestions or feedback about ways to improve or locations/categories you'd like to see mapped. You can also follow me on facebook, where I'll be posting updates and new locations,

https://www.facebook.com/followxiaofei/
asher
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Ink Still Wet in Passport (shífēn xīnshǒu)
 
Posts: 9
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Joined: 23 May 2016, 13:21
In Taiwan since: 0-12-2011



Re: Blog: Waterfalls, Wild Hot Springs, and Camping. A GPS-ridden guide to nature swimming in Taiwan

Postby hansioux » 23 May 2016, 15:31

great blog.

saw you asking how Pork Ribs River (排骨溪) in Yilan got its name.

According to a famous Chinese hiking website (http://www.tonyhuang39.com/tony0949/tony0949.html), the prevailing version of the story is that the river, also known as Linshenxi (林森溪), used to be called Baiguxi (白骨溪, the white bones river). It got that name because as the Japanese cracked down on Altayals in the region, a battle was fought at the river with heavy casualties on both sides. Afterwards the skeletons filled the river, and the river got its name. It was also known as Baiguxi (百骨溪, the hundred skeletons river). The name was too negative and some dude decided to change it to Pork Ribs river, and then tried to change it to Linsen river (probably by a KMT dude, as it's named after a famous KMT leader).

Don't take that version at its face value though. The Japanese did fight the Altayals there back in 1910. However, why would the locals (Altayals) then name the river in Chinese? A more likely version is that there was a Atayal tribe which the Japanese called 擺骨社 (バイクッ, Baiku), which is a phonetic transliteration of an Altayal word.
Don't confuse me with your reasonableness.
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hansioux
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Re: Blog: Waterfalls, Wild Hot Springs, and Camping. A GPS-ridden guide to nature swimming in Taiwan

Postby asher » 23 May 2016, 16:55

Thanks. It seems like a lot of the aboriginal how-it-got-its-name stories involve someone dying. Like 人頭瀑布 (now 飛龍瀑布) in 屏東 which, according to legend, was named that way because long again they used the waterfall as a trap by tricking enemy tribesman into going down the river (and over the falls) to their death.

http://tw.followxiaofei.com/taiwan/%E5% ... 1%E5%B8%83

hansioux wrote:great blog.

saw you asking how Pork Ribs River (排骨溪) in Yilan got its name.

According to a famous Chinese hiking website (http://www.tonyhuang39.com/tony0949/tony0949.html), the prevailing version of the story is that the river, also known as Linshenxi (林森溪), used to be called Baiguxi (白骨溪, the white bones river). It got that name because as the Japanese cracked down on Altayals in the region, a battle was fought at the river with heavy casualties on both sides. Afterwards the skeletons filled the river, and the river got its name. It was also known as Baiguxi (百骨溪, the hundred skeletons river). The name was too negative and some dude decided to change it to Pork Ribs river, and then tried to change it to Linsen river (probably by a KMT dude, as it's named after a famous KMT leader).

Don't take that version at its face value though. The Japanese did fight the Altayals there back in 1910. However, why would the locals (Altayals) then name the river in Chinese? A more likely version is that there was a Atayal tribe which the Japanese called 擺骨社 (バイクッ, Baiku), which is a phonetic transliteration of an Altayal word.
asher
Ink Still Wet in Passport (shífēn xīnshǒu)
Ink Still Wet in Passport (shífēn xīnshǒu)
 
Posts: 9
{ AUTHOR_TOPIC }
Joined: 23 May 2016, 13:21
In Taiwan since: 0-12-2011



Re: Blog: Waterfalls, Wild Hot Springs, and Camping. A GPS-ridden guide to nature swimming in Taiwan

Postby SlowRain » 30 May 2016, 08:36

I just took a quick look at your blog. That is very well done! I plan on utilizing it on my next few trips. Looking forward to more.
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