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B&B rec in the mountains of Hsinchu and Miaoli counties

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Re: B&B rec in the mountains of Hsinchu and Miaoli counties

Postby cranky laowai » 17 Nov 2009, 17:09

I recently stayed at the Shuǐ Yún Jiān (水雲間), which is not far past Nanzhuang's East River Spa. (Nope, I didn't pào in the hot spring this time either, because I was pressed for time and the weather was kind of warm that day.)

The turnoff for the road up to the inn is just a little before the pedestrian suspension bridge. The road quickly gets narrow and steep; and you have to drive about two miles of this before reaching your destination. (No signs in English or romanization. Just look for "水雲間".) I wouldn't want to have done that in a large car or one without a good engine.

The place is nice and has a terrific view. (Let the splash page of the Web site load fully. It really does look like that.) It's clearly a labor of love for the laoban, who's a retired dentist with a love of gardening.

The two-person rooms were full, which worked out for the best since the one we saw looked tiny and the owner let us stay in a much larger four-person room for just a little more money than for the two-person room.

Recommended.
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Re: B&B rec in the mountains of Hsinchu and Miaoli counties

Postby Mucha Man » 17 Nov 2009, 17:24

Jesus, that looks great. Wow. Reminds me a bit of a place I found in Taian a few months ago. Wow again!

But really I hate you. Now I absolutely have to research this area more for the next LP. :fume: :wink:

BTW, Steve Crook told me about a place he stayed in nearby at Penglai. Laoban takes people out at night to see flying squirrels. Now according to Green Tours of the UK Taiwan is probably the best place in the world for seeing flying squirrels. I have never seen one but if you go out at night with a light they are everywhere in some places. The giants have a metre wing span.
“Everywhere else in the world is also really old” said Prof. Liu, a renowned historian at Beijing University. “We always learn that China has 5000 years of cultural heritage, and that therefore we are very special. It appears that other places also have some of this heritage stuff. And are also old. Like, really old.”

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Re: B&B rec in the mountains of Hsinchu and Miaoli counties

Postby cranky laowai » 17 Nov 2009, 17:34

I forgot to add that one can go to the place just for [Taiwanese-style] Western-style tea (about NT$180) or food (NT$350 and up). But I'd be careful with the timing so as to avoid having to do that road in the dark. (On the other hand, those used to driving a lot in Taiwan might not be afraid of anything, especially without many other cars around....)

Mucha Man wrote:according to Green Tours of the UK Taiwan is probably the best place in the world for seeing flying squirrels. I have never seen one but if you go out at night with a light they are everywhere in some places. The giants have a metre wing span.

I've never seen one either; that certainly sounds interesting, though. But if they can get that big I'm a bit surprised there aren't dried ones stretched out across the walls of Chinese medicine shops islandwide.
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Re: B&B rec in the mountains of Hsinchu and Miaoli counties

Postby Mucha Man » 17 Nov 2009, 17:38

They find themselves on aboriginal tables very often. Here's a description of a sighting on Green Tours recent trip to Taiwan:

Half a dozen of us were on a night walk watching the brilliant glowing eyes and torch-lit form of a Red and White Giant Flying Squirrel peering back at us from the highest branch of a massive dead cypress reaching into the starlit sky on the ridge above us. I assured all that they never jump when illuminated by powerful flashlights. Animals always like to prove tour leaders wrong so it launched itself into the night sky and the beam picked it out perfectly as it glided down towards us before banking smoothly to the left and disappearing out of sight behind some epiphyte-clad oaks, still going after eighty metres. There were some sharp intakes of breath and then whoops of delight. It had been an impressive show by one of the world’s largest squirrels, its gliding area measuring nearly a square metre, and what a striking red and white pelage too!
“Everywhere else in the world is also really old” said Prof. Liu, a renowned historian at Beijing University. “We always learn that China has 5000 years of cultural heritage, and that therefore we are very special. It appears that other places also have some of this heritage stuff. And are also old. Like, really old.”

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Re: B&B rec in the mountains of Hsinchu and Miaoli counties

Postby Mucha Man » 17 Nov 2009, 17:40

Anyway, so glad you posted this. I want to do the hike from the Nanzhuang area down to Taian and this sounds like the perfect place to stay the nigth before.
“Everywhere else in the world is also really old” said Prof. Liu, a renowned historian at Beijing University. “We always learn that China has 5000 years of cultural heritage, and that therefore we are very special. It appears that other places also have some of this heritage stuff. And are also old. Like, really old.”

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Re: B&B rec in the mountains of Hsinchu and Miaoli counties

Postby kuoocc » 17 Dec 2009, 15:12

Hi! This is great information! Can some of you include the prices you paid, and the dates you stayed?
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Re: B&B rec in the mountains of Hsinchu and Miaoli counties

Postby cranky laowai » 05 Feb 2010, 16:32

Mucha Man wrote:Jesus, that looks great. Wow. Reminds me a bit of a place I found in Taian a few months ago.

I may be in Tai'an tomorrow night. (It's a last-minute trip.) Do you happen to have info on the place you found there?

The last time I was in Tai'an I stayed at the Sunrise. My parents were with me, so I went more upscale than I usually would (NT$6,400 for a four-person room, including dinner and breakfast, as well as entry to the nice hot spring pools there).

But this time it will be me, my wife, my mother-in-law, and my 3-year-old nephew.

I've heard about a Japanese-era inn that supposedly one has to walk (not drive) across a long bridge to get to. Ring any bells? It sounds like the kind of place that would be either horribly run down or pleasantly rustic.
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Re: B&B rec in the mountains of Hsinchu and Miaoli counties

Postby urodacus » 05 Feb 2010, 17:07

Mucha Man wrote:They find themselves on aboriginal tables very often.

Half a dozen of us were on a night walk watching the brilliant glowing eyes and torch-lit form of a Red and White Giant Flying Squirrel peering back at




an answering quote from chelonia.org

There was only one of this species noted in the Guangzhou Chao Tou food market during this brief trip but it was an amazing animal. Apparently from central China, it had very similar markings to red pandas and was only slightly smaller in size.


what was that saying about Guangzhou and four legs and tables?
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Re: B&B rec in the mountains of Hsinchu and Miaoli counties

Postby headhonchoII » 05 Feb 2010, 17:58

Many years ago some aborigines asked me to go shooting them at night, I didn't know what they wanted to shoot at and since they were steaming drunk I thankfully declined the offer.

I have seen squirrels with another B&B owner in Jiayi and it is a really cool thing to do even though it was also disturbing them a bit on their night-time prowls. They make piercing whistling sounds and it's awesome when you see them glide from branch to branch. It also took him a while to actually locate them and their numbers weren't very many. In many areas that used to have them they are extinct from hunting and loss of habitat (they prefer certain types and ages of trees for making nests and food source).
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Re: B&B rec in the mountains of Hsinchu and Miaoli counties

Postby Mucha Man » 05 Feb 2010, 21:03

cranky laowai wrote:
Mucha Man wrote:Jesus, that looks great. Wow. Reminds me a bit of a place I found in Taian a few months ago.

I may be in Tai'an tomorrow night. (It's a last-minute trip.) Do you happen to have info on the place you found there?

The last time I was in Tai'an I stayed at the Sunrise. My parents were with me, so I went more upscale than I usually would (NT$6,400 for a four-person room, including dinner and breakfast, as well as entry to the nice hot spring pools there).

But this time it will be me, my wife, my mother-in-law, and my 3-year-old nephew.

I've heard about a Japanese-era inn that supposedly one has to walk (not drive) across a long bridge to get to. Ring any bells? It sounds like the kind of place that would be either horribly run down or pleasantly rustic.


Oh, you caught me with internet these days. The place I mentioned. Damn, I am not home so I can't give you a number or website. But, go into little Qing'an village as you drive up County Road 62. Don't go in the first entrance to the village but the one across from a parking lot with a wood cabin on the left (as the road does a wide turn). Cross the small bridge and then turn left and just stay on that road a couple km as it climbs untill you enter a pretty village and an obvious place to stay on the right (wood deck, some buildings, a red brick house in the back).

The place you are talking about is Hushan hot spring. It's nice. On a little island. It's a modern looking place now even if there is some jap heritage. You'll see a sign for it on the way in.

A nice place to eat is just after you cross the long bridge on the 62 (maybe 10 km in); there is that weird hotel on the left before the bridge that looks unfinished (you can't miss it . Across the bridge on the left is a funky little cafe-restaurant run by two Atayal sisters. Good food and music.

For a group of you, you might want to go with a cabin at Tenglong (037 941 002). That's near the end of 62 to the right. It looks like a little village across a red bridge. There's also a new row of cabins as you drive down the side road. Not sure what they are like.
“Everywhere else in the world is also really old” said Prof. Liu, a renowned historian at Beijing University. “We always learn that China has 5000 years of cultural heritage, and that therefore we are very special. It appears that other places also have some of this heritage stuff. And are also old. Like, really old.”

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